RC Jets Discuss RC jets in this forum plus rc turbines and ducted fan power systems

Flying Wing Rudders

Reply

Old 07-13-2018, 12:41 PM
  #1  
flyinfool1
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (2)
 
flyinfool1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Cudahy, WI
Posts: 776
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default Flying Wing Rudders

I have looked at a few flying wing jets. I have 2 in the building que right now. I have a Yellow Aircraft Stingray that will be turbine powered, and a Super scout for a pulse jet. Looking at all the info that I can find I have found examples of both of these aircraft built with various rudder configurations. Some built with the rudders canted in, some vertical and some with the rudders canted out. Both have the rudders far enough apart that heat should not be an issue for canted in or vertical.
Are there any aerodynamic reasons to favor one of the 3 configurations? For looks I like the canted in. The most prevalent is vertical. To me performance will always win over looks.

So what are the advantages or disadvantages of each configuration?
flyinfool1 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2018, 02:50 PM
  #2  
CARS II
My Feedback: (7)
 
CARS II's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Sacramento CA
Posts: 4,274
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

As far as I know, none on our models, full size aircraft like the SR-71 maybe a different story, the Stingray I had and the one a friend had were build with vertical stabs.
CARS II is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2018, 02:56 PM
  #3  
CARS II
My Feedback: (7)
 
CARS II's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Sacramento CA
Posts: 4,274
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default


Ok, found a good explanation, in a nut shell.
The wing loses lift after the AoA crosses a certain angle, with the result that the airplane is no longer controllable.

This is the reason we have two long wing leading edge extensions in the F/A-18 in front of each wing. In the SR-71, the entire fuselage (body) of the front of the airplane has this kind of a sharp edge. These sharp edges and wing root extensions produce vortexes, which, by design, bring air flow to the parts of the airplane which have low dynamic pressure.

The fins are tilted inwards, because the aerodynamics of the airplane produces a vortex that brings flow to the inboard parts of the wing.

Last edited by CARS II; 07-13-2018 at 03:04 PM.
CARS II is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2018, 11:03 AM
  #4  
flyinfool1
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (2)
 
flyinfool1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Cudahy, WI
Posts: 776
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

The Stingray would be harder to build with canted Verticals, But the Super Scout would be pretty easy to tilt in. I just watched a vid of a Super Scout and the verticals were tilted in just a bit and I thought it looked cool. This was the first and only SS that I ever saw with tilted fins. I think I will put them perpendicular to the wing surface on one side which will effectively have them tilted just a bit due to the taper of the wing and the taper of the fin.
I just like to be different.......
flyinfool1 is offline  
Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service