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Cold Fire: fire extinguishers??

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Old 09-04-2010, 12:32 PM
  #26
highhorse
 
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Default RE: Cold Fire: fire extinguishers??


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ORIGINAL: AndyAndrews


Quote:
ORIGINAL: highhorse


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ORIGINAL: AndyAndrews

that stuff is a gel. Theres no way in hell I would spray it in my turbine. I'll stick with CO2, but like others have said its cheap enough to stick a can in every room. Cool stuff.
No, it isn't a gel. At least not according to the several websights they maintain.
If its not a gel, then what is that slimmy gel looking stuff the guy sprayed all over his arm?
Ok, it can be a gel if u want, I don't care.
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Old 05-22-2011, 09:52 PM
  #27
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Default RE: Cold Fire: fire extinguishers??


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ORIGINAL: KC36330

it's a plant-based chemical that undergoes an endothermic reaction in the presence of heat. (it separates the fuel from oxygen)
It would be more accurate to say that it prevents the fuel from decomposing into a oxidizable form. Almost everything that will burn has to be turned into a gaseous state before it can be oxidized in a combustion reaction. It is the heat side of the fire triangle that accomplishes that gassafiction and chemical breakdown of the fuel into the unstable fractions; called free radicals by chemists; that will readily oxidize in the combustion reaction that is colloquially called fire. So products like coldfire reduce the fuel temperature below it's ignition point which is the temperature at which it will give off flamable gas.
Foam and CO2 are the extinguishing agents that actually separate the fuel from the oxegen. CO2 does this by being heavier than air and thus pushing the oxygen containing air away from the combustion zone. Foam does it by inserting a vapor suppressing blanket between the fuel and the air and by also cooling the fuel to the point were it will not give off as much flammable vapor. Keep in mind that flammable liquids give off flammable vapors at normal ambient temperature and pressure. That is why straight cooling will not work to extinguish a flammable liquid fire. Applying water as a fog or fine mist caused the water to flash into steam which smothers the fire by displacing the air. Water expands to 1700 times its liquid volume when it is converted to steam.


Tom Horne

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Old 05-23-2011, 06:06 AM
  #28
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Default RE: Cold Fire: fire extinguishers??


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ORIGINAL: lov2flyrc

Funny you should ask Vin! I contacted them on Monday for some samples to see if they really work as advertised and to confirm they are safe to use with our engines. I should have some cans here in just a day or two and will run some testing on the Cold Fire....

Will report my findings...
Todd
Todd,
Since this thread has been revived, A) did they ever send you a sample to test, and
B) what were the results?
Thanks
Greg
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Old 05-23-2011, 04:03 PM
  #29
johnnyjet
 
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Default RE: Cold Fire: fire extinguishers??

Has anyone been brave enough to spray this “Cold Fire: fire extinguisher “Into a running turbine?
Then did I mess up the bearings?
Johnny
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