RC Radios, Transmitters, Receivers, Servos, gyros Discussion all about rc radios, transmitters, receivers, servos, etc.

Transmitter Storage - Fuse Contact Corrosion

Reply

Old 01-02-2011, 07:56 PM
  #1  
kevenoco
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (1)
 
kevenoco's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 67
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default Transmitter Storage - Fuse Contact Corrosion

After a 12 month storage of a JR 9303 system in a climate controlled environment, I cycled both Rx and Tx batteries and checked the voltage prior to the first flight. I also performed a range check with the motor running. I had an expensive pattern setup that was my first real build project so I took special pride in it and wanted to make sure everything was perfect for this flight.

On the second flight the plane stopped responding in a down line. I had time to turn the transmitter on and off with about 2-3 seconds until impact, as a long shot solution. At the very last moment I wished for a miracle, but she went straight into the trees.

After recovering the airplane almost all the radio components were intact except for 1 servo extension wire that was severed. RX Battery voltage was 6.10V (no load). TX voltage was 10.9V. A range check was again performed and everything passed.

I boxed the entire radio system, servo wire extensions and all, and shipped them to JR (Horizon Service). It turns out that the fuse contacts had heavy corrosion around the contacts. The technician mentioned that he could tap on the transmitter and get it to momentarily turn off.

I also learned that you can update the firmware in the JR Receivers for free by sending them to Horizon. I was using a R921 Rx purchased with the system in 2007. Apparently the new version firmware can reboot from signal interruption in 0.25 seconds whereas the old firmware requires a 3 second reboot. Since I was suffering from only a momentary power interruption this alone would have saved the aircraft with only an odd glitch noticed in flight which could have been subsequently troubleshot. You can test your system by turning the transmitter on and off and checking how long the system comes back to life. I suggest sending your RX into Horizon if it requires the 3 seconds.

I'm not sure if unplugging the Tx battery would be worthwhile for long storage periods to prevent corrosion, but I'm sure it couldn't hurt. The JR technician did not think it was a problem.


Keven













kevenoco is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2011, 12:19 AM
  #2  
Zor
Banned
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Ontario, ON, CANADA
Posts: 3,525
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Transmitter Storage - Fuse Contact Corrosion


ORIGINAL: kevenoco
>
>
>
I'm not sure if unplugging the Tx battery would be worthwhile for long storage periods to prevent corrosion, but I'm sure it couldn't hurt. The JR technician did not think it was a problem.


Keven
We all have switches and outlets in our homes with 100 to 130 volts on them constantly without corrosion.

Some in my house are originals installed 52 years ago and still work normally.

Zor

Zor is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2011, 04:31 AM
  #3  
JIMF14D
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: PATCHOGUE, NY
Posts: 954
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Transmitter Storage - Fuse Contact Corrosion

Always good to check and clean contacts on battery leads and spray with a little electrical cleaner like CRC to keep them clean. Have you ever had a TV control that worked intermittantly and you moved the batteries a little and thngs were ok for a while?

Always frustrating when we loose an expensive model and are not sure exactly why sometimes.

I live near the ocean. About ever two years the doorbell switch has to be cleaned!


JIMF14D is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2011, 08:51 AM
  #4  
pilotpete2
 
pilotpete2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Lyndonville, VT
Posts: 3,298
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Transmitter Storage - Fuse Contact Corrosion

Hi Keven,
The quick reconnect update to the JR/Spektrum receivers makes the receiver recover instantly from a power reset, not from a loss of signal.
Turinng off a JR/Spektrum DSM2 transmitter while in flight, will result in a very long reconnect time, too long for most sport or aerobatic models to be in free flight
Pete
pilotpete2 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2011, 09:59 AM
  #5  
Zor
Banned
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Ontario, ON, CANADA
Posts: 3,525
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Transmitter Storage - Fuse Contact Corrosion

Hi guys,

Got curious reading the preceeding post.

So I experimented with my new Spekrum DX7 and its AR7000 receiver.

Turning the receiver power switch on and off quickly or with many seconds delay before turning the power back on makes no observable difference. The binding and servo actuation are nearly instantaneous.

Turningthe Tx switch the same way asabove gives me a delay of about one to two seconds for recovery. i cannot say more than two seconds.

I wonder if that time may incease with a field strenght reduction but I doubt that.
I do not think the recovery time would increase with a weaker signal at the receiver antenna.

That could be tested in a range check with a distance far enough to just be still in control.

Of course there is no substitute for regular inspection and maintenance.
Some iems unfortunately cannot be inspected easily and only scheduled replacement with a new item is practical. Example the on/off switches on the transmitter and receiver. It takes a fellow like Zor to open a switch and look inside .

Many things have to be a compromise.
I favor a fail safe set to idle the engine or shut off the motor and neutralize the control surfaces with a model balanced to glide on its own as if it was a free flight model. I think it is the best chance of recovering a model without too much damage in the event of a control failure.

If the receiving system in the model suddenly loose voltage there would be no power to bring the throttle and the servos to any preset fail safe position.
Fail safe can operate only on a loss of signal not on a lost of power.


Zor

Edited 03 Jan 2011 a 15:40 to add the text in red above.
End.
Zor is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2011, 10:41 AM
  #6  
kevenoco
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (1)
 
kevenoco's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 67
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Transmitter Storage - Fuse Contact Corrosion

The Horizon man said the 3s vs 0.25s receiver reboot was after "brownout/failsafe". After reading Zor's post this must mean Rx power interruption. In that case my airplane would not have been saved had my Rx had the latest firmware update.

And to test your Rx firmware you should turn the Rx switch on and off and check how quickly it reboots not the Tx. If it takes several seconds, send it into Horizon. It's still a good thing to get updated.

Thanks for checking with your system Zor.
kevenoco is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2011, 11:32 AM
  #7  
Zor
Banned
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Ontario, ON, CANADA
Posts: 3,525
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Transmitter Storage - Fuse Contact Corrosion


ORIGINAL: kevenoco

The Horizon man said the 3s vs 0.25s receiver reboot was after "brownout/failsafe". After reading Zor's post this must mean Rx power interruption. In that case my airplane would not have been saved had my Rx had the latest firmware update.

And to test your Rx firmware you should turn the Rx switch on and off and check how quickly it reboots not the Tx. If it takes several seconds, send it into Horizon. It's still a good thing to get updated.

Thanks for checking with your system Zor.
Saying hello to you kevenoco passing by ___

There is a big diffeence between the loss of control due to a brownout and due to an intemittent coroded switch or connecting cable.

Imagine for example a battery connector failing electrical contact while a high G pull out is being executed.
The control surfaces would haveno energy to change position.

It might barely having had contact before the high G. If we are luckyand the contact comes back on we have a quick near instantaneous control again. That is due to the ability of the receiver to bind quickly again.

In the case of a brownout we have a different situation. In this case it becomes the ability of the battery pack to resume a higher voltage due to a reduced load as the receiver is not sendng control signals to the servos anymore.

In such a case we may be at the mercy of an hysteresis. It is possible but I have not found any info on this as yet. A brownout may occur let us say at an instantaneous voltage of 3.5 V but the receiver might not recover until the voltage comes back up to let us say 4.0 V.(or hiher ???).

Again, proper maintenance of the electrical system is paramount as well as the selection of a battery pack suitable for our application and knowledge of how long our typical flying may last using the available stored coulombs.

Zor
Zor is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2011, 12:41 PM
  #8  
BuschBarber
Senior Member
My Feedback: (2)
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 4,756
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Transmitter Storage - Fuse Contact Corrosion

When a Brownout occurs, the Rx reboots, and as was mentioned, the reboot time depends upon the version of firmware in the Rx. The drop in voltage leading to the Brownout should be a shorter event than the reboot time of the Rx.

When the Rx loses the signal from the Tx, either due to Interference, a loss of power to the Tx, or someone accidentally turning off the Tx switch, the Rx goes into Failsafe, but does not Reboot.

Some of the newer Rx's show a Blinking Light indicating the there was a Brownout or a disruption of power to the Rx. This can be observed by turning off the Rx Switch and then turning it on again or disconnecting and reconnecting the Rx battery.

What I never asked was if there is a Power Disruption to the Rx, Brownout, or Rx Battery Failure, do the servos go to their Failsafe Positions, at the moment of Power Loss, given that they are no longer receiving power to do so?
BuschBarber is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2011, 12:54 PM
  #9  
pilotpete2
 
pilotpete2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Lyndonville, VT
Posts: 3,298
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Transmitter Storage - Fuse Contact Corrosion

I would have to think not. If power is lost, then there's no way for the receivers F/S settings to have time to kick in, and no power for the servos to actually respond to the receivers output.
Pete
pilotpete2 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2011, 01:41 PM
  #10  
Zor
Banned
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Ontario, ON, CANADA
Posts: 3,525
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Transmitter Storage - Fuse Contact Corrosion

BuschBarber,
Some comments ___

ORIGINAL: BuschBarber

When a Brownout occurs, the Rx reboots, and as was mentioned, the reboot time depends upon the version of firmware in the Rx. The drop in voltage leading to the Brownout should be a shorter event than the reboot time of the Rx.
The wording "reboot" and "rebind" may be confusing.
I understand that when or if a receiver "reboots" it is then working internally and communication with the servosandESC (if present) is normal.

The receiver would have to reboot in order to rebind (rebind meaning communicating with the transmitter).

I am interpreting a brownout as being a condition in which the receiver is unable to send commands to its output (the servos and ESC). I do not see any difference if the receiver voltage is cut off completely.
It appears that if the voltage comes back up from a brownout or if the receiver switch had been opened and is closed again, in either case the receiver comes back on life and binds again if he transmitter sgnal is on. So I do not see that any timing is involved.

When the Rx loses the signal from the Tx, either due to Interference, a loss of power to the Tx, or someone accidentally turning off the Tx switch, the Rx goes into Failsafe, but does not Reboot.
If it does not reboot I figure it does not function and there would be no servo movements.
When I shut off the transmitter and fast back on or wait a while and turn it back on I have the red LEDs back on and servo responses wihtin a second or so. To me it means the receiver never UNbooted or very quickly REbooted.

Some of the newer Rx's show a Blinking Light indicating the there was a Brownout or a disruption of power to the Rx. This can be observed by turning off the Rx Switch and then turning it on again or disconnecting and reconnecting the Rx battery.
Yes and while the LEDs are flashing we still have full servo responses. We are still controlling.

What I never asked was if there is a Power Disruption to the Rx, Brownout, or Rx Battery Failure, do the servos go to their Failsafe Positions, at the moment of Power Loss, given that they are no longer receiving power to do so?
No question mark needed.
It is obvious that if the receiving side of the system has no voltage, no available power, the servos cannot move.
I do not know at this time how an ESC would react.. I suspect it would kind of think "I have no signal input so I will not issue (feed)any power to the motor.

[/quote]

Assuming we are expressing ourselves in a friendly manner I believe we are gaining knowledge and valuable experience.

Zor
Zor is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2011, 02:31 PM
  #11  
BuschBarber
Senior Member
My Feedback: (2)
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 4,756
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Transmitter Storage - Fuse Contact Corrosion

There should be no confusion about ReBoot vs ReMind. ReBoot means the OS on the Rx restarts the Boot process.
ReBind means connecting the Bind Plug, turning on the Rx, and turning on the Tx with the Bind Button depressed.
ReLink occurs when the Rx reboots after a Brownout.
BuschBarber is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2011, 03:23 PM
  #12  
BuschBarber
Senior Member
My Feedback: (2)
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 4,756
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Transmitter Storage - Fuse Contact Corrosion

Zor - When I was referring to Brownout, and Timing, I meant that a Brownout happens very quickly. The Rx Reboots as a result of the loss of adequate voltage and the ReBoot time depends upon version of Firmware in the Rx. If you turn off the power to the Rx and turn it on again, it will ReBoot the Rx, just as it would with a Brownout.

The term ReLinking is used to describe the process by which the Tx and Rx reestablish communication after a Brownout. ReLinking is automatic.

ReBinding involves going through the Bind Process and is done manually, by the Operator, just as you would if you were Binding a new Model Memory to a new Rx.
BuschBarber is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2011, 05:15 PM
  #13  
Zor
Banned
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Ontario, ON, CANADA
Posts: 3,525
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Transmitter Storage - Fuse Contact Corrosion



BuschBarber,



I am not implying that the way you look at things is wrong.
If your outlook satisfy you that is fine.



I look at these things differently as follows _ _ _ _



Booting _ _ _ is the process of going from an inert condition when the power source is not connected to a full operating condition soon after the power source is connected. Similar process as our
computers initialize.



Rebooting _ _ _ any subsequent booting.



Bind _ _ _ is the process of establishing a communication link between a transmitter and a receiver. Initially to a new receiver it is done using a jumper per instructions. It also takes place automatically between a Tx and a Rx that has already been bound.



It does not have to be done again unless the bind has been unbound intentionally or accidentally.




Rebind _ _ _ any subsequent binding.



Link _ _ _ may be used as a word referencing to the fact that a bind is existing. There is a link meaning that a bind is existing.



Relink _ _ _ meaning the process of rebinding is being or has been re-established. (rebind).



Whichever way we visualize the processes that are taking place or that exist is just a matter of satisfying our own understanding.



Slight difficulties may arise out of communicating with other people that have a different understanding or interpretation of the wording.



I do not see that as a big problem and do not expect others to see it my way.



Zor



Zor is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2011, 06:44 PM
  #14  
BuschBarber
Senior Member
My Feedback: (2)
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 4,756
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Transmitter Storage - Fuse Contact Corrosion

Zor - I enjoy friendly dialogue as well. I do not enjoy arguing.

Ever since 2.4Ghz radios came on the market, there have been discussions, on RCU and other forums, regarding the definition of the various terms used. I and many others have been coached, over the years, to use the correct terms, and there definitions, so that everyone is on the same page.

You just popped, up on RCU, a short time ago, so you might not have had a chance to review many of the past threads, regarding 2.4Ghz RC radios.

I think you will find that many who provide support on RCU and other such forums use the same terms as I have defined them here.

Binding - This only refers to the process of Binding the Rx to the Tx by using the Bind Procedure as defined by the radio manufacturer.
ReBinding - This only refers to going through the Bind Process again. This is recommended every time you make any major changes to the Programming on the Tx or if the Rx no longer responds to input from the Tx.

Once an Rx has been Bound to a Tx, you remove the Bind Plug from the Rx, and then power the Rx Off and then On. At this point, the Rx is Linked to the Tx. Every time you turn on the Tx and Rx, the Rx is ReLinked to the Tx. If you turn off the Rx and then turn it on again, the Rx ReLinks to the Tx.The term ReBinding is not used here.

Booting is a term used in the computer industry to describe the process of turning on the power to the computer, letting the software on the BIOS chip scan the hardware for various components, and implement various parameters that have been set in the BIOS. It also refers to the process whereby the OS, on the Hard Drive, USB Drive, CD, or DVD boots up and loads the OS into memory.

This same term, Boot, refers to the process that occurs when you turn on either your Tx or Rx.
ReBooting is just rerunning the Boot process.

I did not invent these terms and the definitions I have stated are used widely on the RCU forums as well as other RC forums. I have been coached by the many individuals who I have interacted with, on these forums, for many years. These terms may not have the same definitions as used in the industries where you have worked, but in the RC world, that is what they mean here.

I admit that early in my 2.4 education here, I misused some of the terms and soon learned to use the terms correctly.

Please feel free to ask any of the more learned posters on these forums.

If you you refuse to use the correct terms and there definitions, it is not a crime, but you will just have a harder time communicating.

What is discouraging and frustrating is that you seem to refuse to believe most of what is presented to you.
BuschBarber is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2011, 06:37 AM
  #15  
Zeeb
My Feedback: (41)
 
Zeeb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: St George, Utah UT
Posts: 5,089
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Transmitter Storage - Fuse Contact Corrosion


ORIGINAL: BuschBarber

What is discouraging and frustrating is that you seem to refuse to believe most of what is presented to you.
There's only one solution here Rich; don't feed the trolls....
Zeeb is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2011, 06:43 AM
  #16  
JIMF14D
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: PATCHOGUE, NY
Posts: 954
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Transmitter Storage - Fuse Contact Corrosion

You have that one right for sure!
JIMF14D is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2011, 10:44 AM
  #17  
jquid
Senior Member
 
jquid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: st. charles, IL
Posts: 185
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Transmitter Storage - Fuse Contact Corrosion

While binding and booting are all well and good, the main reason for his post was that of corrosion of the fuse contacts. I think that is another key to look at when bringing out a system into a new year.

He said he checked the battery voltages, cycled etc. so the maintenance of our equipment seemed to be intact here. What the point is, is that there was a unforseen maintenance issue. That of the fuse contacts corroded. Now why corrosion? could be an improper seat of the fuse in the first place, so I for one will make sure that my fuse connection and the back of the board does not have any corrosion. You can cause corrosion by having the fuse sitting off to one side of the holder, an out of shape holder causing a high spot of resistance and eventual corroding.

So thanks for the heads up, and sorry for the loss of yoru aircraft . I for one will not let it happen to any of mine because of your post.
jquid is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2011, 12:27 PM
  #18  
BuschBarber
Senior Member
My Feedback: (2)
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 4,756
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Transmitter Storage - Fuse Contact Corrosion

Sorry to disrupt the flow of this thread. I agree that we should keep the OP in mind and concentrate on the answer to his questions.
BuschBarber is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2011, 06:28 PM
  #19  
onewasp
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: USA
Posts: 2,035
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Transmitter Storage - Fuse Contact Corrosion

ORIGINAL: Zor



BuschBarber,



I am not implying that the way you look at things is wrong.
If your outlook satisfy you that is fine.



I look at these things differently as follows _ _ _ _



Booting _ _ _ is the process of going from an inert condition when the power source is not connected to a full operating condition soon after the power source is connected. Similar process as our
computers initialize.



Rebooting _ _ _ any subsequent booting.



Bind _ _ _ is the process of establishing a communication link between a transmitter and a receiver. Initially to a new receiver it is done using a jumper per instructions. It also takes place automatically between a Tx and a Rx that has already been bound.



It does not have to be done again unless the bind has been unbound intentionally or accidentally.




Rebind _ _ _ any subsequent binding.



Link _ _ _ may be used as a word referencing to the fact that a bind is existing. There is a link meaning that a bind is existing.



Relink _ _ _ meaning the process of rebinding is being or has been re-established. (rebind).



Whichever way we visualize the processes that are taking place or that exist is just a matter of satisfying our own understanding.



Slight difficulties may arise out of communicating with other people that have a different understanding or interpretation of the wording.



I do not see that as a big problem and do not expect others to see it my way.



Zor



_______________________________

Sorry, your understanding of the terms happens to be contrary to the accepted meanings within the RC community .


Along with BuschBarber I happen to think that you have become an authority in your own mind. You have taken it upon yourself to consider your "take" on the meanings as Gospel. It is not!
Example: Binding, is the establishment of GUID. Not as you state.

In my eyes you have considerably over reached your level of knowledge, however reasonable you may feel that is.
onewasp is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2011, 07:37 PM
  #20  
Zor
Banned
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Ontario, ON, CANADA
Posts: 3,525
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Transmitter Storage - Fuse Contact Corrosion


ORIGINAL: BuschBarber

Zor - I enjoy friendly dialogue as well. I do not enjoy arguing.

Ever since 2.4Ghz radios came on the market, there have been discussions, on RCU and other forums, regarding the definition of the various terms used. I and many others have been coached, over the years, to use the correct terms, and there definitions, so that everyone is on the same page.

You just popped, up on RCU, a short time ago, so you might not have had a chance to review many of the past threads, regarding 2.4Ghz RC radios.

I think you will find that many who provide support on RCU and other such forums use the same terms as I have defined them here.

Binding - This only refers to the process of Binding the Rx to the Tx by using the Bind Procedure as defined by the radio manufacturer.
ReBinding - This only refers to going through the Bind Process again. This is recommended every time you make any major changes to the Programming on the Tx or if the Rx no longer responds to input from the Tx.

Once an Rx has been Bound to a Tx, you remove the Bind Plug from the Rx, and then power the Rx Off and then On. At this point, the Rx is Linked to the Tx. Every time you turn on the Tx and Rx, the Rx is ReLinked to the Tx. If you turn off the Rx and then turn it on again, the Rx ReLinks to the Tx.The term ReBinding is not used here.

Booting is a term used in the computer industry to describe the process of turning on the power to the computer, letting the software on the BIOS chip scan the hardware for various components, and implement various parameters that have been set in the BIOS. It also refers to the process whereby the OS, on the Hard Drive, USB Drive, CD, or DVD boots up and loads the OS into memory.

This same term, Boot, refers to the process that occurs when you turn on either your Tx or Rx.
ReBooting is just rerunning the Boot process.

I did not invent these terms and the definitions I have stated are used widely on the RCU forums as well as other RC forums. I have been coached by the many individuals who I have interacted with, on these forums, for many years. These terms may not have the same definitions as used in the industries where you have worked, but in the RC world, that is what they mean here.

I admit that early in my 2.4 education here, I misused some of the terms and soon learned to use the terms correctly.

Please feel free to ask any of the more learned posters on these forums.

If you you refuse to use the correct terms and there definitions, it is not a crime, but you will just have a harder time communicating.

What is discouraging and frustrating is that you seem to refuse to believe most of what is presented to you.
I just read this thread again from the beginning.

I honestly do not see why there should be any consideraton of arguments that are not desirbale.

All I did is express my own viewpoint and explained how I see and understand things to satisfy my own mind.

Here is another viewpoint that I have and I am not arguing with anyone ___

When we follow the instrucion manual for getting the transmiter and receiver to talk only to each other we are doing a binding procedure.

My own logic tell me that as I turn the switches off and there is no more commucnication then there is no binding existing.

If I now turn the transmitter back on followed by the receiver than a new binding takes place automatically as the two units are communicating again. I consider this a rebind each time the system is activated.

If for any reason the binding capability is lost and we have to start over, we simply do again the same procedure to create a new binding. To me it is not a rebind. it is a new binding.and a rebind takes place when the sysem is activated.

No one has to look at it my way and I do not think I worded anything to imply that anyone should.

Zor

Zor is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2011, 08:13 PM
  #21  
Zor
Banned
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Ontario, ON, CANADA
Posts: 3,525
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Transmitter Storage - Fuse Contact Corrosion


ORIGINAL: onewasp
>
>
Example: Binding, is the establishment of GUID. Not as you state.

In my eyes you have considerably over reached your level of knowledge, however reasonable you may feel that is.
onewasp,

Sorry I do not know what is the meaning of establishment of GUID . . .
What is GUID ?

Coulld you also explain what you mean by considerably over reached your level of knowledge.

I certaily understand that the knowledge level can increase but "overreached" ???
Oh __sorry again __I just noticed it is two words, "over" and "reached" .
I am not intelligent enough to understand what you are telling me.

Further explanations would be appreciated.

Zor
Zor is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2011, 08:44 PM
  #22  
BuschBarber
Senior Member
My Feedback: (2)
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 4,756
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Transmitter Storage - Fuse Contact Corrosion

Zor - We can go over the same topics again and again, but you are failing to listen to what we are saying.

When you BIND a Tx to an Rx, the Rx sees the GUID of that specific Tx and stores it in memory. With Spektrum, and Model Match, the BIND is not only between the Tx and the Rx, but with the particular Model Memory, as well.

The term BIND only refers to this process and it holds true whether or not the Tx is on or off.

Linking only occurs when the Tx. and the Rx it was BOUND to is turned on. If the Link is broken, a Failsafe Event occurs. This could be a Loss of Signal due to Interference or the Tx or Rx is turned off.

Binding teaches the Rx to respond to only one Tx. When you turn on the Tx and Rx, they Link to one another.

It is very Simple and it should be easy for you to accept it as fact and move on to more important issues that might be more open to interpretation.
BuschBarber is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2011, 09:15 PM
  #23  
Zor
Banned
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Ontario, ON, CANADA
Posts: 3,525
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Transmitter Storage - Fuse Contact Corrosion


ORIGINAL: BuschBarber

Zor - We can go over the same topics again and again, but you are failing to listen to what we are saying.

I am paying lots of attention to what you guys are writing.
I have my own logical wording for the processes that are taking place but I strongly object to remarks that "I fail to listen" becasue I do pay great attention and have been doing so all along.

When you BIND a Tx to an Rx, the Rx sees the GUID of that specific Tx and stores it in memory. With Spektrum, and Model Match, the BIND is not only between the Tx and the Rx, but with the particular Model Memory, as well.

I have known that for quite a while. I have written about it in my posts. Looks like you guys are the ones not paying attention.

The term BIND only refers to this process and it holds true whether or not the Tx is on or off.

I am not objecting to the way you understand these things. I still think by my logic that there cannot be a bind while nothing is opeating. I am not objeting if you figure a bind exist when all switches and power is OFF.

Linking only occurs when the Tx. and the Rx it was BOUND to is turned on. If the Link is broken, a Failsafe Event occurs. This could be a Loss of Signal due to Interference or the Tx or Rx is turned off.

I have written about all that. including that the receiver stores a code given by the transmitter and another code that identify the specific memory in use in the transmitter.
Did you not read me ?


Binding teaches the Rx to respond to only one Tx. When you turn on the Tx and Rx, they Link to one another.

Yes ___I knew that way before I bought my DX7.

It is very Simple and it should be easy for you to accept it as fact and move on to more important issues that might be more open to interpretation.

I have learned all this stuff quite a while ago and have written a lot about the subject.
I now realize that some misunderstanding exist because some of the fellows here have not read my postings. If they had been read these explanations would not be here.

It would have been realized that I already knew all this. If I had not, I would not have written all the explanaionsI have written for the last few weeks.

I even posted pictures of the signal pulses on the oscilloscope and explained all this binding.

I remain very grateful to BuschBarber for his kind help in the past on some specific subjects.
He is a great guy that likes helping others and witing in the forum. That is part of the hobby.

Thanks again

Zor
Zor is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2011, 10:23 AM
  #24  
Zor
Banned
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Ontario, ON, CANADA
Posts: 3,525
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Transmitter Storage - Fuse Contact Corrosion

All readers,

For those that wonder ___

GUID ... means Globally Unique IDentifier.

which is the code that a specific transmitter sends to the receiver it is binding to.
This code is (I believe) a 16 binary charactersthat is unique to each transmitter shipped from the factory and has 65,535 different combinations.

1111111111111111 (16 ones) converts to 65535 in decimals.

Just for your information.
It is so frustrating to read abbreviations and wonder "what the heck does that mean ?"

Zor
Zor is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2011, 10:47 AM
  #25  
BuschBarber
Senior Member
My Feedback: (2)
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 4,756
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Transmitter Storage - Fuse Contact Corrosion

That is what Google is for.
BuschBarber is offline  
Reply With Quote

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service