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Thread: engine life


  1. #1

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    engine life

    does the transmitter let you know how much flying time is left, so you can land plane safely? what type of flying range is there with transmitters?

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    RE: engine life

    Most of the newer RC Transmitters have Timers built in that let you set how many minutes you want to fly and warn you, with beeps, as it counts down to Zero. I prefer to purchase a small device called the Talking Timer. It can be used as a Talking Clock, or you can set it to Count Up or Count Down. It loudly announces each minute, in English, and plays a tone when it reaches Zero. Just do a Google Search for Talking Timer and you should be able to find out who is selling it now.

    Some of the higher end Transmitters allow you to not only set a Count Down Timer, but you can set a Timer that keeps track of how many minutes the Transmitter has been on for each Model Memory. This helps record the total flight time for each Model.

    As far as Range goes, you should be able to get at least one mile, with Tx and Rx batteries that are properly charged. If you are flying out farther than you can clearly see (2000ft) it probably will not make any difference, unless you have Binoculars.
    Rich
    byronf16@gmail.com

  3. #3
    Zor's Avatar
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    RE: engine life


    I seem to have difficulties posting just after 09:00 EST for the last few days.
    Deleted my posting that I could not edit to correct spelling.

    ORIGINAL: harleyman75

    does the transmitter let you know how much flying time is left, so you can land plane safely? what type of flying range is there with transmitters?
    Hi harleyman75,

    Here is a BMW R69S rider.

    You got good info from BuaschBarber on the timers.

    Concerning range, the basic necessityto fly is to be able to see the attitude of the model in pitch, yaw and roll. Quite obviously the size of the model allows longer distances (range needed).

    Full range transmitter /receivers allows us to control the larger models as far as we can see their attitude. The ability to see their attitude varies due to many factors ____
    Shape of the model,
    The color scheme,
    The direction the model is flying,
    The background sky conditon,
    The antennas orientation relative to each other,
    The healthy conditon of our batteries
    and so on . . . .

    Electronically speaking the maximum range is limited by the signal to noise ratio at the receiver.

    Conclusion is that we do not have to worry about range if we keep our batteries in good maintenance and charge level good enough for our flying time.

    So called "park fliers models" rigs (equipent) have shorter range and should not be used in larger models.

    I have never tried to fly a model while holding or relying on binoculars __.

    Zor

  4. #4

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    RE: engine life

    Good point about the Park Flyers. The limit there is usually the Receiver, although some come with cheap, low power, or Infrared Tx's. When you purchase a Receiver, check to see if it is marked as Full Range. There are a number of smaller Receivers which are designed for small aircraft that you fly in close.

    Regarding Binoculars, back in 1982, a fellow pilot got disoriented and let his aircraft get too far out. I took the Tx but it was too far away to see clearly. Someone had Binoculars and put them in front of my eyes. I was able to see the aircraft looping slowly, but it must have been out of range or the battery died. It was a sunny day and not too windy. We drove in the direction it was traveling, stopping at houses where people were in the front yard. Some had seen the aircraft so we continued on. We eventually found it in a tree over two miles from the flying site.
    Rich
    byronf16@gmail.com


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