RC Radios, Transmitters, Receivers, Servos, gyros Discussion all about rc radios, transmitters, receivers, servos, etc.

Delayed turn on...

Reply

Old 08-16-2003, 09:04 PM
  #1  
ChixwithTrix
Senior Member
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (8)
 
ChixwithTrix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 394
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default Delayed turn on...

I have a JR 955 PCM reciever on my Edge 540 with all digital servos. I turn the reciever on and I have to wait a second for the servos to turn on and move. Is that little bit of delayed time because of all of the long extentions that the current has to go through before it reaches the servo itself? Once the servos are on they work like normal. If it is not the longer extensions then what could it be?
Thanks
ChixwithTrix is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2003, 10:25 PM
  #2  
Thud_Driver
My Feedback: (1)
 
Thud_Driver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Victorville, CA,
Posts: 1,616
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default Delay

It's the software in the microprocessors in your servo's initializing, just like when you turned on your computer. My digitals always take a second longer than the rest of the system to be ready to go. After that the time delays are in signal processing in the Rx and servo's. The time on the extensions is the speed of light.
Thud_Driver is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2003, 03:00 AM
  #3  
ChixwithTrix
Senior Member
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (8)
 
ChixwithTrix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 394
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default Delayed turn on...

ok, thats good to know nothing is wrong.
Thanks
ChixwithTrix is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2003, 06:50 AM
  #4  
Lynx
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 1,373
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default Delayed turn on...

The extension would have to be several thousand miles long to show a delay a second in responce like that =)
Lynx is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2003, 12:51 PM
  #5  
FlyinBrian
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: NorthamptonNorthants, UNITED KINGDOM
Posts: 54
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default Delayed turn on...

186,000 miles !
FlyinBrian is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2003, 01:45 AM
  #6  
Lynx
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 1,373
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default Delayed turn on...

Actually less than that Flyin => Electricity doesn't actually move at the speed of light, it's a common misconception. It moves at something like 60-80% of the speed of light, and depends on the material it's moving through.
Lynx is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2003, 03:41 AM
  #7  
Gone to a Higher Plane
Banned
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 264
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default Delayed turn on...

Ha Lynx...does that hold true for fiber optics??? I think not...but I could be wrong.
Gone to a Higher Plane is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2003, 07:26 AM
  #8  
Lynx
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 1,373
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default Delayed turn on...

Lol. No. But the funny part is it's actually worse
It takes longer to convert the signal to light and then back to electricty than it would to just send electricity =\
I don't know, electrical engineers and physicists never seem to agree. An electron is negativly charged. Yet the source of the electrons on a battery is considered the positive terminal. Figure that one out!
Lynx is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2003, 08:51 AM
  #9  
Gone to a Higher Plane
Banned
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 264
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default Delayed turn on...

Something I have always wondered is...does light treat resistance the same as electrons...or should I say does light have any ability so travel through resistance? I know that light can bend but how far can light bend?
Gone to a Higher Plane is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2003, 04:04 AM
  #10  
Lynx
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 1,373
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default Delayed turn on...

Resistance of electron flow is not like classical physical resistance, a resistor doesn't exert a force on the electrons like the word resist seems to imply. It's more like water flow. At a given pressure a given amount of water will flow through a given pipe size. No more or less, only so much can fit. The water isn't 'held back' it simply has no where to go. Light doesn't bend though, it can be reflected and refracted but it always travels in a straight line unless it encounters a physical object. The 'bending' you're referring to in the presence of a gravity field isn't the light bending, it's the space warping causing the perceived path of the light to change. Relativity is funny that way.
Lynx is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2003, 02:48 PM
  #11  
MHawker
Senior Member
My Feedback: (16)
 
MHawker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 2,586
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default Delayed turn on...

Originally posted by Lynx
Resistance of electron flow is not like classical physical resistance, a resistor doesn't exert a force on the electrons like the word resist seems to imply. It's more like water flow. At a given pressure a given amount of water will flow through a given pipe size. No more or less, only so much can fit. The water isn't 'held back' it simply has no where to go. Light doesn't bend though, it can be reflected and refracted but it always travels in a straight line unless it encounters a physical object. The 'bending' you're referring to in the presence of a gravity field isn't the light bending, it's the space warping causing the perceived path of the light to change. Relativity is funny that way.
My head hurts....... :stupid:
MHawker is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2003, 03:03 PM
  #12  
Ross Kean
Senior Member
 
Ross Kean's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Fredericton, NB, CANADA
Posts: 686
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default Delayed turn on...

Originally posted by Proteus
Ha Lynx...does that hold true for fiber optics??? I think not...but I could be wrong.
186,000 miles/sec is the speed of light in vacuum. Speed is slower in a medium such as glass. Further complicated by the fact that the light does not follow a straight path through a fibre - it gets reflected back and forth a bunch of times from the walls of the fibre.

Having said all of this, the distance the signal has to travel (electrons or photons) is so small that the time delay for signal propagation is not observable without some fairly sophisticated instrumentation.

Ross
Ross Kean is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2003, 06:40 PM
  #13  
SMALLFLY-
Senior Member
My Feedback: (19)
 
SMALLFLY-'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Evansville, IN
Posts: 2,156
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default Delayed turn on...

Good ol RCU.... ask a simple question a get a 3 part course in beginner electronics
SMALLFLY- is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2003, 07:00 PM
  #14  
Thud_Driver
My Feedback: (1)
 
Thud_Driver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Victorville, CA,
Posts: 1,616
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default Speed

Jeez, I guess I just didn't think it was important enough to get off into the speed difference of electricity in copper vs light in vacuum. Oh well
Thud_Driver is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2003, 11:40 PM
  #15  
Gone to a Higher Plane
Banned
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 264
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default Delayed turn on...

Ha Thud-Driver...you aint heard nothin yet...I have been e-mailing Steve Hawkings at Cambridge for about 2 years now and we have some pre-Big Bang battles that would make Newton proud.
Gone to a Higher Plane is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2003, 12:49 AM
  #16  
Shortman
My Feedback: (21)
 
Shortman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 5,966
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default Delayed turn on...

Either way, electricity moves DAMN FAST rofl
Shortman is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2003, 02:28 AM
  #17  
Thud_Driver
My Feedback: (1)
 
Thud_Driver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Victorville, CA,
Posts: 1,616
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default Hawkings

Haven't much paid attention to real physics since my degree in '68. Got sidetracked flying fighters for Uncle Sam and then flight test engineering since. Actually I read Hawkings (first??) book back in the 70's I think, don't remember the name of it although it was the rage for intellectuals then. Kinda of tossed it off after the first chapter or two on the propagation of light. Couldn't much get interested in it. So what's Hawkings into now.....dark energy???
Thud_Driver is offline  
Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service