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Dual recievers- or two seperate batteries?

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Old 11-12-2002, 05:43 AM
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Rcpilot
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Default Dual recievers- or two seperate batteries?

Which is better- dual recievers and batteries- or a single reciever and a seperate battery for servos and reciever?

I'm building a H9 Cap 232 14/ scale. I've got a rudder servo for 1/4 scale planes and it puts out over 300oz. in. at 6Volt. It ALSO draws 700mah at full load. I'm using a 1650mah niMH pack.

I want to use dual recievers with dedicated packs. I will run one reciever for rudder and throttle only. The other reciever will run both aileron servos and both elevator servos.

Or- can I use a single reciever with a small pack(4.8V/800mah nicad) to power the reciever and a larger pack (6V/1650mah niMH) for the servos? Where do I buy the electronic gadget to do this? What is it called? How do you hook it up?

Can I run two reciever packs (6V/1650mah niMH) on the same reciever with a Y-harness to operate the servos; and a seperate pack for the reciever itself(4.8V/800mah nicad)?

Thanks
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Old 11-12-2002, 05:56 AM
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Default Dual recievers- or two seperate batteries?

You did say this was H9's 1/4 scale CAP, right?

Sounds to me like your contemplating rigging a larger model, a much larger model.

For various reasons, weight being the primary one. You just don't need all this redundant equipment which leads to complexity, additional failure sources and expense.

The simple approach is often the best methodology.

I'd suggest that you have too much rudder servo. A jumbo is heavy, uses lots of power and is large. I'd use a high end standard size Digital servo for rudder. This is more than adequate on this model.

One RX, one HD switch harness, 4 or 5-cell battery with at least a 1400mAh rating, or more.
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Old 11-12-2002, 06:58 AM
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Default Dual recievers- or two seperate batteries?

Mike summed it up very well, you don't need 2 receivers in a 25% plane. If you were setting up a 40% or larger 2 receivers would be needed. An isolater is not needed on a plane this small. Adding all the additional weight and system complexity is a bad idea. In terms of servo's a jr 8411 or hitec 5945 will be more than enough. When you get done adding all the batteries and other equipment if you find the plane is underpowered I've got a 3w-240 we can mount on it.
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Old 11-12-2002, 11:16 PM
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Default Dual recievers- or two seperate batteries?

Any comments from someone who KNOWS how to use the dual recievers?

I'm experimenting on a small plane now, so that when I jump up to 35% or 40%- I'll have the bugs worked out and know how too use the products.

Regardless of whether you think its a bad idea or not- I'm asking for information. Can anyone provide a concise answer to my questions?
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Old 11-13-2002, 12:30 AM
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Default Re: Dual recievers- or two seperate batteries?

Originally posted by Rcpilet
Which is better- dual receivers and batteries- or a single receiver and a seperate battery for servos and receiver?
This scenario is a matter of personnel preference. If you were using nine or more high power, high current consuming digital's then I would use two RX's. Or the use of servo POWER-Buss isolator would do the job as well, with one battery and switch for the RX and one battery and switch for the servo power-buss isolator. Both present additional connections and equipment.

I'm building a H9 Cap 232 14/ scale. I've got a rudder servo for 1/4 scale planes and it puts out over 300oz. in. at 6Volt. It ALSO draws 700mah at full load. I'm using a 1650mah niMH pack.[/B]
You going to end up with a heavily wing loaded model with the application of this equipment, in this case go with the lightest combination that fits your desires.

You don't mention the other servo your going to use?

I want to use dual receivers with dedicated packs. I will run one receiver for rudder and throttle only. The other receiver will run both aileron servos and both elevator servos.[/B]
Generally dual RX's are setup as follows:

RX #1: Throttle, elevator servo[s] right side, aileron servo[s] right side with one switch and battery dedicated.

RX #2: Choke or engine kill function[?], elevator servo[s] left side, aileron servo[s] left side and rudder servo[s] with one switch and battery dedicated.

IMO rudder servo[s] make sense on one RX for the simple fact that if one RX system fails your not fighting the second, third and or fourth servos for control with the functioning RX system.

Or- can I use a single reciever with a small pack(4.8V/800mah nicad) to power the reciever and a larger pack (6V/1650mah niMH) for the servos? Where do I buy the electronic gadget to do this? What is it called? How do you hook it up?.[/B]
Yes, this viable but I'd suggest it with the use of nine servos or less. A larger mAh battery pack, such as a 2400mAh with a jumbo servo is preferred.. The device is known as servo POWER-BUSS isolator. Several manufacturer's offer these. Electrodynamics, I4C, EMS Jomar to name a few. These cost around $70.00 if I recall.

Can I run two reciever packs (6V/1650mah niMH) on the same reciever with a Y-harness to operate the servos; and a seperate pack for the reciever itself(4.8V/800mah nicad)?.[/B]
Typical single RX setup on a 33%/40% model would be one RX, two HD switches and two high capacity battery packs plugged directly into the RX, no wyes. No additional RX battery.

The need to provide power directly to the jumbo servo[s] via a wye is generally not required if rigged as suggested above. This is a worthy consideration if your using multiple jumbo's or digitals in extreme locations. JR and Futaba offer a device that is similar to the servo POWER-BUSS isolator that allows you to match the servos center and end-points while providing an independent power source. The draw back is you need one for each channel your contemplating, unlike the power-buss isolators mentioned previously.
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Old 11-13-2002, 04:18 AM
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Default Dual recievers- or two seperate batteries?

Any comments from someone who KNOWS how to use the dual recievers? I'm experimenting on a small plane now, so that when I jump up to 35% or 40%- I'll have the bugs worked out and know how too use the products. Regardless of whether you think its a bad idea or not- I'm asking for information. Can anyone provide a concise answer to my questions?
Well Rcpilet why do you bother to ask the question in the first place when you already know the answers?
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Old 11-13-2002, 05:10 AM
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Default Dual recievers- or two seperate batteries?

Giant scale- I asked the question because I DID NOT know how EXACTLY to run the dual reciever setup- or if I should just run a single reciever with a twin battery pack.

It was an honest question.

If you ain't got nothin' nice to say-- don't say nothin' at all.

Ever heard that before Giant Scale?
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Old 11-13-2002, 05:15 AM
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Default Dual recievers- or two seperate batteries?

The general consensus is to run a single receiver with a single or dual pack for a plane smaller than 35%. This was not the answer you were wanting to hear. Do a search on this forum, this question has been asked before.
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Old 11-13-2002, 05:46 AM
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Default Dual recievers- or two seperate batteries?

I DID search this forum BEFORE I started this thread.

My questions were not answered by reading the archives, so I asked it here.

Giant Scale- you have no idea what answer I was looking to hear.

I didn't ask anyone if they thought it was a bad idea or a good one. Did I? You volunteered your OPINION that it was a bad idea for a plane of this size. I told you that I was going to do it anyway and needed info. on how to use this setup properly.

Now I've had it with your snide remarks. I don't give a rats @$$ if you like it or not. I'm going to do it for my own reasons. It's a hobby- its supposed to be fun. I'm going try something new and learn something along the way.

If that makes your blood boil or leaves you shaking your head;; well- thats your problem- not mine.

I pi$$e$ me off when one of you so-called "experts" tries to make someone else look foolish or ignorant- just because they ask a question.

Troll
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Old 11-13-2002, 10:27 AM
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Default Your Question

RC pilet:

In response to your question,yes you can run dual rec'rs with 2 seprate battery packs....2- rec'rs.2-switch harneses, 2- batteries....batteries can be any ma ( lets say 1-800ma and 1 1200ma) but keep the voltage the same...in other words, both have to be 4.8 or 6.0 volts..This outfit has a unit you can buy for that. < www.electrodynam.com> thier unit is call "EDR- 108 Pow"R Back"R..check it out....BTW,I intend to use dual rec'rs and batteries in my big scale project..same set up as I mention.....Good luck
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Old 11-14-2002, 07:36 PM
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Default Dual recievers- or two seperate batteries?

These links may be helpful:

Use of a high output servo with dedicated power source. This was specifically for retracts on a large-scale glider, but concept may be applicable to your situation.
http://www.scalesoaring.net/separate...ct%20power.htm

Redundant battery setups, right and wrong way to do it:
http://www.soaringissa.org/tech_tips.../Batteries.htm

Good luck with the project.
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Old 11-15-2002, 08:55 PM
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Default Re: Dual recievers- or two seperate batteries?

Originally posted by Rcpilet
Which is better- dual recievers and batteries- or a single reciever and a seperate battery for servos and reciever?
Single receiver and separate batteries.

If you use separate receivers, you have the added complexity of dealing with two antennas and another part that can fail, without adding much, if any, redundancy.

Separate batteries accomplishes the load splitting you are looking for, without the cons of two receivers. BTW, you can separate batteries into more than two packs, depending on the load of your servos (or your desire to play around some more ) Lastly, you can use redundant battery packs on each/all circuits as you desire (e.g., two redundant batteries, one 1200 mAh & one 600 mAh backup, for receiver; one 1200 mAh battery for rudder; one 600 mAh battery for throttle and ignition; and two redundant batteries, one 1200 mAh & one 600 mAh backup, for aileron & elevator). This may be overkill, and excessively heavy, for a smaller plane, but fun to do nonetheless. I plan on using such a system in my 1/7 C-47 I am currently scratch building.

Have fun!

George
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