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50mhz radios

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Old 12-03-2002, 11:29 PM
  #1  
Soniq7
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Default 50mhz radios

How popular are the 6 meter radios in your area? I have a General class license and I have considered going to 50 because its mostly never in use here. I do have concerns about being shot down by readily available HT's like the Yaesu VX5 that have had the simple diode mod and TX over the entire RC band. At 5 watts no less! Any thoughts ?

Mike
S7
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Old 12-04-2002, 12:42 AM
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Vince
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Default 50mhz radios

One of our club members is a ham, and recently quit using 50mhz radios for the reasons you voiced.

Vince
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Old 12-04-2002, 07:07 AM
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Default Re: 50mhz radios

Originally posted by Soniq7
How popular are the 6 meter radios in your area? I have a General class license and I have considered going to 50 because its mostly never in use here. I do have concerns about being shot down by readily available HT's like the Yaesu VX5 that have had the simple diode mod and TX over the entire RC band. At 5 watts no less! Any thoughts ?

Mike
S7
Mike,

I only know of one person at my flying club that's on 50 mhz out of about 70 members.

What is a "Yaesu VX5" and an "HT"?


Don
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Old 12-04-2002, 08:53 AM
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Default Re: Re: 50mhz radios

Originally posted by MyStar


Mike,

I only know of one person at my flying club that's on 50 mhz out of about 70 members.

What is a "Yaesu VX5" and an "HT"?


Don
HT = Handie Talkie (i.e. Walkie Talkie)

VX5 = Yaesu HT that can transmit on 6 Meters (http://www.yaesu.com/amateur/vx5r.html )

-Jeff- N0ZIG
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Old 12-04-2002, 03:22 PM
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LesUyeda
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Default 50mhz radios

I have been using 6 meters for RC flying since the late 50's, and have never had a problem.

Les
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Old 12-09-2002, 09:49 PM
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rthorne
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Default 50mhz radios

I've been flying on 50mhz for a few years with no problems. I would stay away from 53mhz due to repeater output pairs ect.

50mhz has been allocated for R/C. I've listened several times with my ham band receiver sitting on my channel. I've never heard a peep on that freq.


Also the sunspot cycle is on the downward turn. Here in the next year or two 6 meters will be dead to the world for the most part.
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Old 12-10-2002, 04:53 PM
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Rodney
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Default 50mhz radios

Most HAMS, just like most RCrs behave very well and take pride and care in not causing problems. HAMs know that there is a section on the 6 meter band allocated to models and tend to stay away from that section for other uses. In over 30 years of using 6 meteres for models, I have never had any interferance. There is increasing activity in the 53 MHZ area for repeater use so you would be wise to stay in the 50MHZ area.
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Old 12-11-2002, 10:50 PM
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Default Ham band operation

I've been flying for about 5 years now on 6 meters (03) near Atlanta, GA with no problems. I am using a dual-conversion receiver with my JR8103, however. We have about 4 people in our club that fly on 6 meters and no one has reported any problems. The only thing I've heard is that it's best to stay out of the high band (53MHz) due to repeaters but I don't have any direct evidence of interference there.
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Old 12-12-2002, 12:26 AM
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Soniq7
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Default 50mhz radios

Well, this is good info. But in the end I decided to go with my old standby, 72630. Mostly because I have plenty of recievers, so it was partly a financial decision. Thanks for the replies.

S7
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Old 12-12-2002, 12:33 AM
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Default Ditto all the above ...

I'm the only one in our Club of 23 members flying on 50 MHz. Here in Canada, the 6m band is used even less than it is in the States.

I've had absolutely no difficulties flying on 6m (other than what my thumbs cause!) and like others have noted, it can sure cut down on the waiting time to get on the frequency board! I know of one other ham flying on 6m here in Nova Scotia, and I did a little frequency coordination with him to make sure we don't get in each other's hair.

The point about the field programmable radios is well taken, but remember it's easier and cheaper for an idiot bent on mayhem to shoot down a 72 MHz radio. Any $20 Attack 4 will do it!
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Old 12-12-2002, 01:17 AM
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Default 50mhz radios

Due to recent interference problems with the "outlaw" fliers in central NY (the ones who don't want to join a club), I am converting my entire univ. research fleet to the 50 mhz band. It is not only an issue of reducing the probability of expensive crashes but an issue of safety. Hams are much more considerate as a group than the 72 mhz group. I believe it is because of a better understanding of RF, interference and propagation etc. In addition, the effort required to get a "ticket" screens out many of the "quick fix" individuals.

Just my 2 cents

Elson K2BUG
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Old 12-14-2002, 07:15 PM
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The PIPE
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Default I'm apparently going to be the ONLY 50 MHz flyer in MY club in the new year....

Dear Soniq7:

The PIPE here-and as a dedicated Ham RCer (callsign is KA1ABG ), and since I've been re-entering the hobby since May 2001 with my OWN single stick RC gear-I've ALWAYS built my OWN gear-I will be flying in 2003 on 50 MHz with a pair of Gordon Anderson MICROSTAR [ http://mstar2k.com/ ] computer encoder based single stick radios, both converted from Ace RC MicroPro 8000 single stick radios...one I built and had a SICK encoder in, the other obtained over the Internet. Both these "first two" MicroStar transmitters will have TWO Ace RC FM RF decks in them (with FMA transmit crystals, which ARE fully usable with the older Ace RC RF decks), with one on 72 MHz and one on 50 MHz for "dual-band" usage, and switched with a 4PDT locking miniature toggle switch atop the transmitter case. I also have THREE "gutted" ProLine Competition Series single stick transmitters that will ALSO get MicroStar encoders in the future-and these will most likely use Gordon Anderson's OWN synthesized Ham band RF deck he created primarily for use with his MicroStar radio encoder board.

I renewed my Tech class Ham license (I've had it since 1978) last summer over the Internet with the FCC, and it took only SIX DAYS to get my renewal filed and the new license in the mail, into my hands-how's THAT for service!

You can check at http://www.artscipub.com/repeaters/ for six meter repeaters in YOUR area of the USA...I used this to find out about TWO repeaters near my club's field in Southeast MA, and finding out about THEM solidified my decision to use 50 MHz for future use in my flying models! I DO have three Ace RC 53 MHz AM RF decks, but I'll JUST use these with my four older Silver Seven AM receivers for GROUND based models if I ever have the need for them!

I'm mostly going to be using the ODD numbered 50 MHz freuqencies with my MicroStar single stick radios, as these are the ones I've seen used the LEAST at big RC meets like the Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome's RC Jamboree the weekend after Labor Day each year-my first two MicroStars are going to be on two of these odd numbered 50 MHz channels.

The first MicroStar "knobby" single stick radio SHOULD be ready for use as the 2003 flying season begins-with a pair of Ace ProStar FM receivers to use with it with the Ham RF deck, and a pair of the Hitec Model 3800 "shift-selectable" seven channel Rx-es for 72 MHz usage with the other RF deck...the second one will be finished near the end of this year's coming flying season.

Right NOW I've got some ANNOYING bathroom floor repair work to finish up over the next week or two-but I'll be back to working on the first of my MicroStar single stick radios very soon after the tile is re-installed on the bathroom floor...!

Yours Sincerely,

The PIPE!
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Old 01-03-2003, 06:45 AM
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Default 5o mhz bnad

I have absoutley NO problem on the 50 mhz portion of the 6 mtr band.
At my field, out of 320+ members ther are only 4 who fly on 6 mtrs. And then, only myself and one other ham fly that often.
You might want to check at the field you fly at who else flys on 6, and then pick your channel accordingly. I have xmtrs on 03, 04, and 05. use 03 most of the time, 05 occasionlly04 rarely
Litteraly "own" the channel when I am at the field.
By my signature, you can tell where I fly at.
In closing, I woudl not worry about HT's giving you any problem.
(That's unless someone REALLY dislikes you.)
Gary Smith
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Old 01-11-2003, 10:11 PM
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onewasp
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Default 50mhz radios

50mhz

I've been on six meters since the seventies. I fly 50 now but I never had a problem on 53 when I used it.

Buying a new radio, I decided to distance myself from the repeaters. Same experience, rock solid performance.

You'll certainly know if you are hit by with one to five full gallons!!
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Old 01-12-2003, 12:31 AM
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Default Ham band

I have been flying since 1987 on the ham bands. Never had a problem with 53 or 50. I have flown in contests all over the country including Dallas, Los Angeles and Miami without any problems.
Brian
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Old 01-12-2003, 04:28 PM
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Default 50mhz radios

The bottom line is you are FAR more likely to be shot down due to interference on 72 MHz than on 50 MHz .
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Old 01-20-2003, 06:44 PM
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Default 50mhz radios

One added note:
FCC did NOT "allocate" any 6 meter frequencies for R/C use...it is strictly a gentleman's agreement that results in the strong suggestion that R/C users restrict themselves to the lower part of the 6 meter band ( 50mhz ) as opposed to the upper half (53mhz)
I have flown 53 all over the country for more than 30 years - and have never been 'hit' . But I recently upgraded equipment and dropped my R/C activity into the 'accepted' range of frequencies - with no ill effects. I do , however , use a scanner for on sight confirmation of a clean frequency (( a hand held multi band ham unit )). If you're legal ( have a ham ticket ), the ham frequencies are the ONLY way to go !!
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Old 01-20-2003, 07:06 PM
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Default 50mhz radios

I also fly on 50 and 53 mHz without any problem. I wouldn't buy anything new on 53 but I will continue to use what I have on 53 till I upgrade to something on 50mHz.

One note. Thre is no part of the 6 meter band that is sacred during the VHF contest if the band is open.

Pete
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Old 01-20-2003, 07:28 PM
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Default 50mhz radios

6 Meter amateur band FCC allocations:

All Amateurs except Novices:
50.0-50.1 MHz: CW Only
50.1-54.0 MHz: CW, Phone, Image, MCW, RTTY/Data


TITLE 47--TELECOMMUNICATION

CHAPTER I--FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS
COMMISSION (CONTINUED)

PART 97--AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE--Table of Contents

Subpart C--Special Operations

Sec. 97.215 Telecommand of model craft.

An amateur station transmitting signals to control a model craft may
be operated as follows:
(a) The station identification procedure is not required for
transmissions directed only to the model craft, provided that a label
indicating the station call sign and the station licensee's name and
address is affixed to the station transmitter.
(b) The control signals are not considered codes or ciphers intended
to obscure the meaning of the communication.
(c) The transmitter power must not exceed 1 W.

[54 FR 25857, June 20, 1989, as amended at 56 FR 56171, Nov. 1, 1991]
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