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confused about rabio for beginner

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Old 05-29-2003, 05:33 PM
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mebljr
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Hi, I just signed up a few days ago and posted one thread and found out there is help out in the Boonies! I'am going to buy my first radio soon ahd have reading what has been said here on R/C universe, but still like advice on brands channels 4or6and such. The first plane will be Topflite pt 40 arf. Thanks MEL.
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Old 05-29-2003, 05:52 PM
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Combat kid
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My dad and i both started with a 4 channel futaba, still have it 3 years later, still works perfectly. I now am using a 6XA Futaba I bought used from a friend. I would recomend getting a 4 channel Futaba for starters, or if ur nerdy like me, maybe go for the computer 6 channel radios, they could be a nightmare for a beginer to learn how to program. Don't go get yourself some 8 channel monster radio, thoses are expensive.
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Old 05-29-2003, 06:31 PM
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Thats one of my first choices the next is a Jr 4 channel I've good about both. The next thing I guess is finding a instructor and see what radio he has. Thanks
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Old 05-29-2003, 06:32 PM
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Default confused about rabio for beginner

I have to agree with Combat Kid - a basic 4 / 5 channel radio is an excellent choice for a beginner. If you suspect you will be advancing quickly, then a computer radio may be a better choice. Typically though, most pilots don't suggest a computer radio until your second or third radio. The main advantage to waiting a year or three, is newer radios, with new features are contantly being developed. This year's newest wiz-bang radio often becomes next year's run-of-the-mill radio.

I've been flying for 12 years before I bought my first computer radio this year.

Before you decide on the brand, check to see what your instructor uses. Not all brands are compatible when using a trainer cord.
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Old 05-29-2003, 08:58 PM
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Combat kid
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That brings up a good point, make sure that you can buddy box with your instructors Transmiter, it will save you some planes. A four channel radio will work good for you.
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Old 05-31-2003, 01:00 PM
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Another choice is to buy two four channel radios; one with flight pack and the other just the radio only. Make sure the two radios are on separate channels than the other; for instance make one a 58 and the other a 54. That way if you get another plane you can just buy a flight pack with a receiver to match the channel of the spare radio. Buy a buddy cord for the two radios and this way you don't have to worry about matching the instructor's radio, he can use yours. It's also easier to set up the trims up to match each other. You can get two basic four channel radios for the price of one computer radio.
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Old 06-03-2003, 01:43 AM
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spend the money and buy a good 6 channel radio. there is going to be a time that you will need one. radios are not like batteries and servos that you can replace anytime. true a four channel radio will work great for beginners. but you get more use out of a 6 channel. they cost a bit more than the four channel, but if you are planning on advancing one of these days, the four channel may not be adequate for other type of planes, unless you are going to fly trainer planes for ever.
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Old 06-03-2003, 03:14 PM
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Just my opinion but I would buy the best radio I could afford.You wil be surprised how fast you will out grow a four channel set.and when you do you might not be able to buy a better radio at that time
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Old 06-03-2003, 03:30 PM
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Default confused about rabio for beginner

I too would buy the best radio you can afford. I have had some radios for 15 years. If you buy good ones, they will last if you take care of them. Buy the brand your instructor has so you can buddy box with him. Way easier to learn. I would get a 6 ch computer radio as a minumum.
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Old 06-03-2003, 04:38 PM
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Default confused about rabio for beginner

I have to agree with some of what has been said already. A basic 4-channel radio is fine for trainers and simple planes, but can quickly be outgrown as you advance.

If you're starting out with one of the 'RTF' .40-sized ARFs which include a basic 4-channel TX, so be it. Use that radio. There's no point in spending a bunch of $$ upgrading the radio - at the beginner skill level it won't make much of a difference.

OTOH if you're picking up your components seperately there's no point in going barebones on the radio. A low-end computer rig doesn't cost a whole lot more than a 'midrange' analog 6-channel radio, and will generally have features useful not only with your trainer but potentially with "your next plane."

Another choice is to buy two four channel radios; one with flight pack and the other just the radio only. Make sure the two radios are on separate channels than the other; for instance make one a 58 and the other a 54.
I have to disagree with this idea. Why start out with barebones radios on multiple channels? Spend the $$ for a decent main TX. If you want your own buddy box keep an eye on the swapshop. Compatible barebones buddyboxen turn up there on a regular basis for $40 bucks or less - why drop $70 or more on a limited-use spare?
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Old 06-04-2003, 04:28 PM
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Default confused about rabio for beginner

Facts:
Trainers don't need anything more than a basic 4-channel radio.
4-channel radios are basically a flight pack with a FREE transmitter.
Computer radios keep getting better and cheaper, so waiting to buy one will likely result in getting you a better radio, or saving you money.
Most folks starting out in this hobby would like their initial cash outlay to be as low as possible, while not spending money on items that will be "shelved" if they upgrade.

Opinions/advice:
Find out what brand is used by your trainer and/or club members, and stick with that. That will give you buddy-box capability and at-the-field technical help, if needed.
Buy a basic 4-channel setup for your trainer. If you upgrade, you can shelf the transmitter at no cost, or you have a free buddy box.

While you're learning on your trainer, you will start to get a feel for what type of flying you enjoy (speed, aerobatics, precision, etc.) Once you have that, you will be more aware and informed about what type of radio fits you for the long run.

I almost bought a 6-channel for my first radio, and I'm extremely glad I didn't. I ended up with a 9C, and I am now using my FREE 4 channel transmitter as a buddy box for my boys. No money wasted!
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