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Channel 11 & 60 the ends, are they no mans land???

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Old 03-31-2002, 02:20 AM
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Greg Cothern
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Default Channel 11 & 60 the ends, are they no mans land???

I have a question about the channels on the ends of the 72 mhz, ie 11 & 60. I have a couple guys who say never use them for fear of interference with what ever has been assigned the frequency before and after the R/C channels.
What are you thoughts on this? Any experiences good or bad please let me know.
Thanks, happy and safe flying.
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Old 03-31-2002, 02:26 PM
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Aladinbama
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Default Channel 11 & 60 the ends, are they no mans land???

A fellow modeler in a club I used to belong to (OK my instructor) had several of his planes on channel 11. We flew next to a full scale (pretty much small plane type) airport that was located well outside city limits. He had an analyzer which he checked often, but I think that was just for safety reasons. (he is a Continental 737 pilot - pre flight checks and all) Several of his planes were in the 3 to $8,000 range and he traveled with them to airshows in different cities. Whereas I am not an expert on this subject, he has flown R/C for @20 years or so, and in my opinion, he wouldn't risk loosing a plane if that was true.
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