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abufletcher 02-19-2004 12:56 AM

Best first WWI airplane for newbie pilot
 
I'm still getting my wings on a basic RCM Trainer 40 but am looking on down the road (make that runway) and am wondering how to make the transition from high-wing trainer to WWI biplane. I'd like something at least crudely scale looking. The sadly now-discontinued Global D-VII would have been just fine. Can anyone recommend a relatively docile WWI flyer for as a "second-plane" for a newbie pilot? Either ARF or full-build kit is fine.

Don't worry I promise to keep on working with that trainer (and with RealFlight)! Thanks.

papermache 02-19-2004 01:35 AM

RE: Best first WWI airplane for newbie pilot
 
Abu,
As a transition to a biplane, why not try a WWI monoplane? Top Flite makes the "sorta scale" looking Elder, which is a fairly easy build and lots of fun to fly. Balsa USA makes a Taube and an Eindecker in two sizes (.40 size and .90 size) and a Bristol M-1 in .40 size. I've seen the eindeckers fly and they're beautiful planes. BUSA makes excellent kits.
A WWI monoplane would give you that scale feel and looks without the extra work involved with building a biplane (especially as a first kit). Good luck!
papermache

abufletcher 02-19-2004 02:50 AM

RE: Best first WWI airplane for newbie pilot
 
I like the idea of an Eindecker (or any of the other early monoplanes) but most of these used wing-warping systems instead of ailerons and I don't think I'm ready for that (either as a flyer or as a builder). How does flying a biplane compare to flying a trainer or a mid-wing, low dihedral plane?

pettit 02-19-2004 07:30 AM

RE: Best first WWI airplane for newbie pilot
 
Balsa USA: Both the Eindecker and Taube have non-scale ailerons. I have had one of each and they fly just fine.

The Taube wing is a little tricky to build, but it looks great in the air, especially when covered with translucent fabric.

jharkin 02-19-2004 09:18 AM

RE: Best first WWI airplane for newbie pilot
 
I'll second the Balsa USA planes. I have the Eindecker and love it. You'll learn a bit more about building and scale but it flies like a taildragger trainer. Plus it doesnt want to ground loop as bad as triplanes, Camels etc.

With a little work you can add some basic scale details (landing gear, dummy flying wires) and at altitude you cant tell they "cheated" (ailerons and cnoventional tail surfaces). You can look at my gallery to see a finished example.


JH

Idigbo 02-19-2004 05:57 PM

RE: Best first WWI airplane for newbie pilot
 
Abu, don't know much about the B USA WW1 stuff, but another company to look at is Flair. They produce a superb range of WW1 models in their Scout Range. They include an SE5a, Fokker D7 and Dr1, Etrich Taube, Nieuport 17, Sopwith 'something' and a Bristol F2b fighter. They all fly extemely well, though I wouldnt recommend the Dr1 Triplane as it is a bit more involved in the take off and landing department, if you get what I mean!
They are all traditional built up, build it yourself kits, easy and reasonably quick to put together. Flairs British Website is www.ss16.dial.pipex.com although there is a supplier on your side, but I don't know who. I have personal experience of the SE5a, Fokker Dr1 and D7, and have seen all of the rest fly well. Cannot recommend them enough, Ian.

Chevelle 02-19-2004 08:36 PM

RE: Best first WWI airplane for newbie pilot
 
I was in your place, looking for a WWI plane that flew well and easy. I did a fair amount of checking and heard great things about both Balsa USA and Flair. I was all set to go with a Flair SE5a and then I did some rethinking after looking deeper into BUSA. Their 1/4 scale Sopwith Pup kit is bigger yet less than the cost of the Flair. I looked at the whole picture. If I went with the Flair, there was the price of the kit, a new four stroke motor and the cost of glow fuel. With the Pup, it was the kit, a gas motor, and gasoline prices. It was just about a wash. What tipped the scale for me (besides the urging of a few club members) was the email that I got from BUSA.

Here was my email to them...

I am seriously considering your 1/4 scale Pup. I am back into R/C after a long separation. My flying skills have come back and I would consider myself an intermediate flyer. This would be my second plane since getting back into the hobby. The club that I belong to is very helpful and will assist with the preflight checkout and maiden flight trimming.

I am an experienced "stick and tissue" builder (static and R/C) although not competition class. I am not looking to fly with a high degree of pucker factor. Scale flying is what I am after without a lot of anxiety. Also, I fly off of grass and have tail dragger experience.

Your 1/4 scale Pup looks like a good candidate. Can you give me some more information about what is required to build and fly it? I am also considering a Zenoah G26 for power.

* * * *

Part of their response was...

You, Sir are exactly who the 1/4 scale Sopwith Pup was designed for!

The construction employed in its design is very reminiscent of the old style "stick and tissue" construction you seem to be familiar with, the parts are just bigger that's all! You shouldn't have any trouble building the Pup or any other of our 1/4 scale WWI models.

The Pup is a lightweight model and a pure pleasure to fly. The model is slow and easy going yet capable of WWI style aerobatics, loops, split-S's, barrel rolls stall turns, that sort of thing, it just does it slowly! Generally it flies like a big trainer the only time "pucker factor" may be a problem is if one of your buddies builds our Fokker DR1, that has been known to cause trouble!

All in all I really think you will enjoy both building and flying the Pup it truly is a nice model!

* * * *

My plane is just about all framed up. I'd say I'm about 60% through it. The instructions are very good and the materials are excellent. No major issues or problems. So far it has been a straight forward build. The only thing I will do significantly different is I will be changing the undercarriage to a more authentic version so I can get some suspension for the wheels. Their design has very little play.

I should have it in the air by this spring, no problem.

Good luck!

abufletcher 02-20-2004 02:14 AM

RE: Best first WWI airplane for newbie pilot
 
Thanks for all the advice. The Flair aircraft look very nice as do the BUSA kits. I don't think I'm ready for a 1/4 kit at the moment. The BUSA looks just about perfect. Would you imagine the BUSA Eindecker 40 is an easier plan to fly (and land) than the Global Fokker DVII?

abufletcher 02-20-2004 06:33 PM

RE: Best first WWI airplane for newbie pilot
 
Well, I after (not all that much) thought I went ahead ahead and ordered the BUSA Eindecker 40 kit. It looks like a good beginning build and a fair flyer. Now all I need is to start looking into a marking scheme!

superflea 02-21-2004 09:17 AM

RE: Best first WWI airplane for newbie pilot
 
does any one know where i can find a construction review on the busa 1/3 sopwith pup. i am considering getting this kit, but have heard both good and bad things about busa kits. this would not by any means be my first kit, but would just like to see if there are some pics and an article written that could help me to see for myself what i may be getting into prior to ordering.

3d-aholic 03-22-2004 01:17 PM

RE: Best first WWI airplane for newbie pilot
 
Quote:

ORIGINAL: abufletcher

I'm still getting my wings on a basic RCM Trainer 40 but am looking on down the road (make that runway) and am wondering how to make the transition from high-wing trainer to WWI biplane. I'd like something at least crudely scale looking. The sadly now-discontinued Global D-VII would have been just fine. Can anyone recommend a relatively docile WWI flyer for as a "second-plane" for a newbie pilot? Either ARF or full-build kit is fine.

Don't worry I promise to keep on working with that trainer (and with RealFlight)! Thanks.
Buy it ready to Fly...I'm selling mine on Ebay. Item #3182962092. Its in great shape...and its gorgeous!!!!

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...gename=rvi:1:1

vonJaerschky 03-25-2004 03:23 PM

RE: Best first WWI airplane for newbie pilot
 
I scratch built an SE-5a from Model Airplane News plans (designed by Rich Uravitch) a number of years ago. It is a fantastic flyer. Flatbottom airfoil, and non-scale strip ailerons on the bottom wing only, made for easy building. Very maneuverable, yet a very docile flyer. I would highly reccomend it. Mine was overpowered with a Saito .65. There is a kit available from Hobby hangar http://www.hobbyhangar.com/test/kits.htm . I don't think you would be dissapointed with this plane. By the way, Rich Uravitch also designed a Fokker D. VII to go along with it, and Hobby Hangar also has a kit.

R/C Ray 09-28-2013 03:29 PM

If you want the BEST FLYING BUSA 1/4 Scale, it's definitely the SE 5a. I have the Nieuport 17, Spad XIII, Fokker D7 and the SE5A. The easy build is the Nieuport 17.

Good Luck.....Ray.

TFF 09-28-2013 03:54 PM

Slightly late to the party; he has built about a half dozen since the thread was made.

abufletcher 09-28-2013 10:04 PM

Wow, what a blast from the past!

But if I had to answer my own question posted almost 10 years ago, I'd recommend (to myself) a BUSA 1/6 scale Pup or the Flair Puppeteer. In my mind the BUSA eindecker doesn't count because it's really just a dressed up ugly stik, not really a WWI model. On the other hand, a more scale EIII is not necessarily a good WWI "trainer."

If there's anyone out there who hasn't flown a biplane tail-dragger, well, you're really missing something!!!

foodstick 09-29-2013 09:20 AM

RC Ray, do you feel like the SE5a is more docile yet controllable than the Pup and D7 ?
I always felt like the DR1 is capable of some crazy manuevering, but the D7 was the best sort of point it and it will go there type plane.
My friend just finished the SE5a, and it flies great.. but I still like the clean response of the D7 more.

I was just curious ...

Boomerang1 09-30-2013 12:02 AM

1 Attachment(s)
I know the WW1 aircraft I'd be the most comfortable flying - The Junkers D1.

It's the most WW2 like WW1 model I can think of! :D

John.

http://www.rcuniverse.com/forum/atta...mentid=1926029


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