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Vietnam A.T.C.H Scratch Build With R/C

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Old 05-11-2019, 08:57 AM
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ojays
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Default Vietnam A.T.C.H Scratch Build With R/C

I had a bit of a modellers block (lack of mojo) last year.
I had several builds on the go, and at one point realised I just wasn't enjoying what I was working on.
Browsing another modelling group, I came across a bit of a challenge that caught my interest.
There was going to be a group build, with only 3 months in which to complete it.
As all my previous builds had all been conversions of plastic kits, which always took me an age to do I thought, why not.
The theme was 'Size Matters' which coincidentally coincided with a book I had been reading about the Vietnam War.
'Brown Water, Black Berets' a very interesting book about the riverine forces used during that war. In this book there was a section
about the converted LTCs that were converted to be able to land, refuel and re-arm helicopters while actually on the rivers.
As well as to pick up or carry troops to where they needed to be.
I had recently seen a 1/48 stand off scale plan for one of these by Glynn Guest. It was a very basic plan, however I knew I could expand
and elaborate from this.
The title for my build was, 'The Worlds Smallest Aircraft Carrier' Although not factually true as that was actually a aeroplane tender/barge of the Royal Navy
back in the 20's- 30's.

I had already decided to digress from the plans/instructions, as I wanted to use what I already had in stock to keep costs down.
This would be a multi media build.
I did have to buy a Huey kit (Kitty Hawk UH-1D) and a crew f(Hasegawa Ground Crew Set) to be modified as necessary.

The hull was cut out from plain balsa sheet with the same for all the bulkheads. The plans called for a build with no rudders, relying on differential power
to the two props. I wanted twin rudders and recessed props as per the real vessel.
I made up two tubes from card board and inserted them in the slots I had cut in the hull bottom. These would form the shape for the plasticard sheet I was using
to clad all the hull outer sections.
The prop shafts were installed at this point, and plastic filler applied where necessary
When this had been completed the hull was given an all over coat of automotive aerosol primer, before going any further.










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Old 05-12-2019, 10:39 AM
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The superstructure was made up from thin balsa and card, then plasticard sheet was attached to this.
I raised the deck area slightly, to allow for more freeboard and to be able to attach various bits and pieces such as tarps, netting etc.
A hatch was built into the stern area to allow access to the rudder connections. A small hatch was also made just behind the bow as this is where
I intended to put the receiver.
Most of the electrics were put in at this point.
The bar armour is made up from strip plasticard (again) along with the flight deck. This was scribed to replicate planking and plastic angle was
attached all around it's outer edge. When this was completed the whole assembly was primed with automotive etch primer.





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Old 05-16-2019, 02:05 PM
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I had decided I wanted the Huey to have a working main rotor.
I inserted a small 6 volt motor into the transmission casing, and made a shaft from carbon fibre rod. This was supported
in a bearing sleeve made from carbon fibre tube.
The kit rotor head controls were attached to the top of the bearing sleeve.
Several PE parts were used in the build for better detail, these had a coat of self etch primer before assembly.
The cockpit top transparencies were made from green clear plasticard.
The crew had arms, legs, heads and torso's cut apart and re attached in the positions I wanted.











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Old 06-17-2019, 01:39 AM
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With all of the effort going into making a really nice model, it seems a shame to avoid putting the props where GG suggested when he drew the plan to give a decent water flow.
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Old 06-17-2019, 11:25 AM
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Originally Posted by mfr02 View Post
With all of the effort going into making a really nice model, it seems a shame to avoid putting the props where GG suggested when he drew the plan to give a decent water flow.
I wanted to replicate the way the real vessels props were situated, plus I wanted rudders not motor differential steering.
She actually works just fine, in fact I only use 1/4 throttle to achieve scale speed.
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Old 06-17-2019, 11:37 AM
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The tarps and nets were made from medical gauze and household tissue. Both were given a coat
of thinned white pva, mixed with olive drab acrylic paints. I put them in the microwave (very impatient) for 20 seconds,
the tarps were rolled and tied with appropriate coloured cotton.
The stars and bars is made from a photo copied picture onto very thin copy paper, given a coat of thinned white pva and
folded while still wet.

The whole vessel was then sprayed with Automotive Aerosol Primer, before applying the olive drab acrylic finish.
A final coat of matt varnish was applied to everything including the Huey.






















Last edited by ojays; 06-17-2019 at 11:54 AM. Reason: missed txt
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Old 07-06-2019, 04:52 PM
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This is an awesome build! Bravo!

Perhaps you could share this on RC Groups scale boats forum.

https://www.rcgroups.com/scale-boats-55/
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Old 07-07-2019, 06:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Kmot View Post
This is an awesome build! Bravo!

Perhaps you could share this on RC Groups scale boats forum.

https://www.rcgroups.com/scale-boats-55/
Thanks for the positive comment.
I had forgotten about that group even though I have another build on there.
Hopefully will get the time to update on that forum.
Regards
Gregg
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Old 08-23-2019, 07:50 AM
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Your attention to detail is very impressive! Nice build!
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