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MOKI RADIAL Care and Maintenence

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Old 08-29-2019, 10:00 AM
  #4301  
vickyz
 
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Very much appreciate on the advice.thank you so much to spend time to teach newbie like me
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Old 08-29-2019, 02:08 PM
  #4302  
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Originally Posted by RichardGee View Post
No you do not and should not.
I'm curious Richard why?
The pump instructions say to disconnect it and we have always done that with no issue. The whole point of the electric pump is to provide the carb with fuel at a constant pressure.
Just wondering if you have had a different experience.
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Old 08-29-2019, 05:31 PM
  #4303  
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Originally Posted by Howie-RCU View Post
I'm curious Richard why?
The pump instructions say to disconnect it and we have always done that with no issue. The whole point of the electric pump is to provide the carb with fuel at a constant pressure.
Just wondering if you have had a different experience.
I left my pump tube intact as a pseudo insurance policy, should the electric pump fail to work properly,
After many flights, I have experienced zero issues leaving the pump tube in place. I also figure it isolates the engine internals from contamination.
I don't claim to be an authority and could be dead wrong on this, but thus far it has worked fine this way.
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Old 08-29-2019, 05:55 PM
  #4304  
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OK I see where you are coming from but unless you are going to the trouble of maintaining the tube and making sure it is not blocked, then it's not really insurance. If you are going to that trouble then get rid of the electric pump because the carb pump works a treat if the line is not blocked. Just my $0.02
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Old 08-29-2019, 06:28 PM
  #4305  
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Originally Posted by Howie-RCU View Post
OK I see where you are coming from but unless you are going to the trouble of maintaining the tube and making sure it is not blocked, then it's not really insurance. If you are going to that trouble then get rid of the electric pump because the carb pump works a treat if the line is not blocked. Just my $0.02
Interestingly, after many flights, my fuel pump pulse tube is absolutely clear of any grease.
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Old 08-29-2019, 06:34 PM
  #4306  
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Originally Posted by Howie-RCU View Post
OK I see where you are coming from but unless you are going to the trouble of maintaining the tube and making sure it is not blocked, then it's not really insurance. If you are going to that trouble then get rid of the electric pump because the carb pump works a treat if the line is not blocked. Just my $0.02
Howie, I might just jump in with my experience if that's ok. I installed my pump because I was having trouble with the first start of the day, however in the process of installing the pump I realized I had the tank below the level of the carby, I installed the pump after repositioning the tank simply because I did not want to go to the trouble of opening up my fuselage again!!!. I really do think that if the tank was higher than the carb in the first place then the pump would not have been necessary. I have left the original pump installed and keep an eye on the line for any grease that may block it but as yet have not seen any sign of obstruction at all!
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Old 08-29-2019, 06:35 PM
  #4307  
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Originally Posted by RichardGee View Post
Interestingly, after many flights, my fuel pump pulse tube is absolutely clear of any grease.
Yep not surprised. I have seen 10 year old Moki's that have plenty of flights and no issue with grease in the tube and some that are 3 month old and the tube is blocked after 20 flights.
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Old 08-29-2019, 06:40 PM
  #4308  
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Originally Posted by tmac48 View Post
Howie, I might just jump in with my experience if that's ok. I installed my pump because I was having trouble with the first start of the day, however in the process of installing the pump I realized I had the tank below the level of the carby, I installed the pump after repositioning the tank simply because I did not want to go to the trouble of opening up my fuselage again!!!. I really do think that if the tank was higher than the carb in the first place then the pump would not have been necessary. I have left the original pump installed and keep an eye on the line for any grease that may block it but as yet have not seen any sign of obstruction at all!
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Hi Macka
Tank height "shouldn't" make any difference.
You started out with a brand new engine that would of got easier to start and better running after it had some time on it maybe??
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Old 08-29-2019, 08:50 PM
  #4309  
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Howie, I agree that the height of the tank with a walbro type carby is not as critical as our old rc motors (methanol) We have been spoilt with our DA engines, but they are two stroke and seem to have better suck( if that is the correct terminology,) than the 4 strokes. I never ran into difficulties in getting the fuel to the carby ( stopping in the line short of the carby) like I have witnessed with the Moki! ( ie 4 stroke)
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Old 09-05-2019, 05:07 PM
  #4310  
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Default JB Weld ?

Was wondering if anyone knows whether or not JB Weld would stand up to the heat in a typical Moki exhaust extension ?
I would be using the original JB Weld epoxy, as their newer "high temp formula" gets pretty negative reviews.
Thanks-Mike O
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Old 09-05-2019, 05:20 PM
  #4311  
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Originally Posted by IFLYBVM2 View Post
Was wondering if anyone knows whether or not JB Weld would stand up to the heat in a typical Moki exhaust extension ?
I would be using the original JB Weld epoxy, as their newer "high temp formula" gets pretty negative reviews.
Thanks-Mike O
I made an exhaust extension using hobby grade Silver Solder and it melted straight away. I doubt JB Weld would stand up to the heat.
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Old 09-06-2019, 12:35 AM
  #4312  
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Originally Posted by IFLYBVM2 View Post
Was wondering if anyone knows whether or not JB Weld would stand up to the heat in a typical Moki exhaust extension ?
I would be using the original JB Weld epoxy, as their newer "high temp formula" gets pretty negative reviews.
Thanks-Mike O
Mike,
I extended mine with jubilee clips. Put a saw cut down the extension tube short of the end of the overlaping area so the tube can contract onto the exhaust and tighten up the clip. I've had no problems with this approach.
Bob
Page 92 of the Carf P47 manual shows how it's done - with thanks to Richard Gee.

Last edited by Blancr; 09-06-2019 at 04:45 AM.
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Old 09-17-2019, 08:12 AM
  #4313  
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Default Exhaust temps ?

Has anyone ever taken their temp gun and took a reading at the end of the exhaust extension pipe ?
Working on an exhaust idea and just wondering what kind of temps to expect at the end of a typical
( 8 inch or so) extension. (Moki 250)
Thanks-Mike O.
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Old 09-20-2019, 06:53 AM
  #4314  
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Default Moki 400 ignition.

I am wondering if you can use the moki 250 ignition on the moki 400, Ive misplaced the 400 ignition and the plugs and sockets seem to be the same, And secondly does anyone have a spare one they wanna sell ?
Cheers
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Old 09-21-2019, 08:22 AM
  #4315  
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No, the Hardware is the same, but the ignition curves are different...
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Old 09-21-2019, 08:58 AM
  #4316  
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Pants. Will have to get a new one then. Thankyou for the reply.
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Old 11-04-2019, 05:54 AM
  #4317  
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hi folks,
new owner of a s180, this is my first radial engine
I went through the whole thread and according to what I read, I already replaced the original ignition with a ch-ignition one.
I'll also use a rcxel pump. The carb is modified with a fuel return line.
I have a question regarding the lubrication of the front case: is it still advised to inject transmission oil in it in addition to the original grease ? If yes, I understood that I have to remove one the #1 cylinder stem, but not sure about the maximum level I have to reach. Should I remove the higher #3's stem or lower #2's ?.
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Old 11-04-2019, 06:10 AM
  #4318  
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I am not sure of the answer to your question, and will leave it for one of the other guys.
Just a comment though-I have always wondered why the 150/180 seems to need and or benefit from the CH or Rainbow Ignition aftermarket units, but the 250 seems to be happy with the stock ignition. I had a 150 with the stock ignition that never did run right, but looking back now I think the CH Ignition would most likely have fixed my 150's issues.
-Mike O.
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Old 11-04-2019, 06:29 AM
  #4319  
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pmosf, a reminder to keep the rpm's down. as the motor breaks in it will gain power, and rpm's. Tach it often, you may need to turn down the throttle end point. too many rpm's and you'll loose a rod in flight.

One more item is to slow down your throttle servo speed. I received this advice from the Dr, and a slower throttle servo made a big difference in the motor transition from idle to high speed, then I was able to really dial in my 150.

Last edited by fatfreddy17; 11-04-2019 at 06:58 AM.
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Old 11-04-2019, 06:39 AM
  #4320  
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Originally Posted by IFLYBVM2 View Post
I am not sure of the answer to your question, and will leave it for one of the other guys.
Just a comment though-I have always wondered why the 150/180 seems to need and or benefit from the CH or Rainbow Ignition aftermarket units, but the 250 seems to be happy with the stock ignition. I had a 150 with the stock ignition that never did run right, but looking back now I think the CH Ignition would most likely have fixed my 150's issues.
-Mike O.
My theory? The smaller crankcase of the 150/180 does not dissipate the heat and chaos of ignition quite as well as the larger crankcase of the 215/250. This creates extra stress on ignition components inside the crankcase and causes them to fail more readily.
All else being equal, I can think of NO other reason for reduced ignition reliability with the smaller engines.
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Old 11-04-2019, 07:09 AM
  #4321  
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Default 150 Ignition

Originally Posted by RichardGee View Post
My theory? The smaller crankcase of the 150/180 does not dissipate the heat and chaos of ignition quite as well as the larger crankcase of the 215/250. This creates extra stress on ignition components inside the crankcase and causes them to fail more readily.
All else being equal, I can think of NO other reason for reduced ignition reliability with the smaller engines.
Hmmm-makes sense, as it seems the coil pack is what fails often on that motor.
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Old 11-04-2019, 10:16 AM
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Originally Posted by IFLYBVM2 View Post
Hmmm-makes sense, as it seems the coil pack is what fails often on that motor.
I can testify to having a #4 coil go bad on my older 250. It happened just after the one year mark and before I could fly it in the plane. I de-soldered the bad one and installed a new coil and everything has been great for the 9+ years and hundreds for flights. As for adding grease in the cam lifter housing, I periodically (once per flying season) inject a heavy weight gear oil through the lifters.
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Old 11-04-2019, 11:07 PM
  #4323  
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RichardGee, I agree with your explanation, the coils are exposed to heat and vibrations, that's quite a harsh operating environment. The only advantage I see is the electromagnetic shielding given by the case.
Jaketab, do you have a rough idea of the volume you inject ? should I fill up to the crankshaft level?
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Old 11-05-2019, 05:42 AM
  #4324  
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Originally Posted by pmosf View Post
RichardGee, I agree with your explanation, the coils are exposed to heat and vibrations, that's quite a harsh operating environment. The only advantage I see is the electromagnetic shielding given by the case.
Jaketab, do you have a rough idea of the volume you inject ? should I fill up to the crankshaft level?
About 1 ounce or less in the #1 intake and exhaust lifter guides. Disclaimer - my Moki is older and well run in. This is what works for me.
If the engine is new and under warranty, I would not due this without first seeking the advice of the manufacturer or dealer for fear of voiding the warranty.
There are also those that send the Moki in for service to have the front case repacked with factory grease.
The USA Moki dealer- Gotz Vogelsang has always be very forthcoming and responsive in answering my questions about the engine.
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Old 11-06-2019, 07:38 AM
  #4325  
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Originally Posted by Jaketab View Post
About 1 ounce or less in the #1 intake and exhaust lifter guides. Disclaimer - my Moki is older and well run in. This is what works for me.
If the engine is new and under warranty, I would not due this without first seeking the advice of the manufacturer or dealer for fear of voiding the warranty.
There are also those that send the Moki in for service to have the front case repacked with factory grease.
The USA Moki dealer- Gotz Vogelsang has always be very forthcoming and responsive in answering my questions about the engine.
What grease/oil are you using?
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