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  1. #2501

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    I remember Claudes mdel from way back in the day.......I aint that old but still slow

  2. #2502

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    I had that in my mind based on my recollection of claud's model... just couldn't recall it exactly.. kept geting the image of the cuban sea fury's in my mind.

  3. #2503

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Good morning.............

    This one is a research one.

    Toward the end of WWII in the Pacific, the Japanese were finally developing fighters and bombers that didn't give away 100mph to the P-38, F4U, P-47, et al.

    In 1944, what would have been the fastest two Japanese a/c that were actually operational. One would have had a masculine Allied nickname so would have been a fighter, but the other would have had a "bomber" nickname, so would have had a "girl's" name. And how fast would they have been?

    (The most reliable specs I have for operational speeds of the allied fighters about that time show the
    P-38 capable of 405@20,000
    P-51D - 437@25,000
    P-47C - 433@30,000
    F4U - - 446@26,200)
    Good flying wit ya today

  4. #2504
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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    My first guess would be Myrt...Nakajima C6N?

    Max. speed 610 kph / 379 mph
    < Wrongway Feldman's Kreider-Reisner KR-21...(on Gilligan's Island)

  5. #2505

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: proptop

    My first guess would be Myrt...Nakajima C6N?

    Max. speed 610 kph / 379 mph

    I'd bet the Myrt was probably as fast operationally as the two I have in mind, but my books show it was about 15mph slower than the "bomber" and 10mph slower than the fighter.

    The Myrt (Saiun or Colorful Cloud) was certainly fast for a plane that looked like a torpedo plane and had a crew of 3. One of my books says it's, "speed and altitude performance enabled it to out-run and out-climb most Allied fighters in 1944." But the same book shows it's top speed to be 378mph@19,685'.

    I'm going to stick with the specs from that book as the judgement basis. BTW, the book doesn't show any of the operation Japanese a/c having a top speed into the 400s.
    Good flying wit ya today

  6. #2506

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Technically there is the MXY7 Ohka (535 MPH)

  7. #2507
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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    For a fighter, I think the Ki-84 Frank was probably the fastest operational fighter that they actually made a bunch of...
    I've seen the max. speed listed at 427 mph IIRC.
    < Wrongway Feldman's Kreider-Reisner KR-21...(on Gilligan's Island)

  8. #2508

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: proptop

    For a fighter, I think the Ki-84 Frank was probably the fastest operational fighter that they actually made a bunch of...
    I've seen the max. speed listed at 427 mph IIRC.

    Yup, according to most of my books, that was the fastest fighter they used in any numbers. That book puts it's speed at 388mph@~20,000'. The book also has the P-38 at 405mph so The Frank was only 10-15mph slower than the slowest fighter it would have encountered with any frequency.

    Now...... how about that "bomber"?????

    Good flying wit ya today

  9. #2509

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    hey, proptop, I think you now get to ask half a question since you got half the answer.
    Good flying wit ya today

  10. #2510

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: Evil_Merlin

    Technically there is the MXY7 Ohka (535 MPH)

    Yes, but I'm going to consider it outside the "fighter/bomber" designation just for this challenge. And it really wasn't seen in any numbers. At least not many got to the target.

    But it certainly would have been the fastest, since the Swallow never made an appearance.
    Good flying wit ya today

  11. #2511

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: da Rock

    Good morning.............

    This one is a research one.

    Toward the end of WWII in the Pacific, the Japanese were finally developing fighters and bombers that didn't give away 100mph to the P-38, F4U, P-47, et al.

    In 1944, what would have been the fastest two Japanese a/c that were actually operational. One would have had a masculine Allied nickname so would have been a fighter, but the other would have had a ''bomber'' nickname, so would have had a ''girl's'' name. And how fast would they have been?

    (The most reliable specs I have for operational speeds of the allied fighters about that time show the
    P-38 capable of 405@20,000
    P-51D - 437@25,000
    P-47C - 433@30,000
    F4U - - 446@26,200)
    Just a quick guess, but I think the operational fighter is easy. The bomber may depend on your definition, but I'll take a shot. Thanks; Ernie P.

    FIGHTER:
    The Ki-84 Hayate ("Storm") was one of the finest Japanese aircraft of World War II, and was given the code name of "Frank" by the Allies. With a maximum speed of 430 mph at 20,000 feet, the Ki-84 was faster than both the American P-51 and the P-47. When flown by qualified pilots the Ki-84 was a match for any of the Allied fighters. Work on the Ki-84 began early in 1942 and was completed just over a year later. By the time the aircraft had completed its testing program and was ready to be mass produced, however, Japanese industry was already being overburdened. In 1944 Nakajima modified the structure of the Ki-84-I so that aluminum could be saved by constructing some components of wood. This lead to the Ki-84-II having the rear fuselage, the wing tips, and other minor elements built of non-strategic material. This concept was taken one step further when the Tachikawa Hikoki K.K. company built an all-wood version of the Ki-84 that was designated the Ki-106. The Ki-106 program was a complete success, but the course of the war caused it to end before the results were fielded.

    BOMBER:
    The last heavy bombers used in large quantities by the Japanese army was also the best. The Mitsubishi Ki-67 Hiryu ("Flying Dragon") was extremely maneuverable, fast, and well armed. The plane reached combat units when it was too late to change the course of the war. The Ki-67 ("Peggy" in the Allied code) saw duty in the Japanese counteroffensive at Iwo Jima and in the Marianas, as well at during the American landing at Okinawa. Priority was given to the production of Ki-67s until the end of the war. The army authorities issued specifications for the successor to the Nakajima Ki-49 Donyru in February, 1941, and Mitsubishi took up the project. The first of three prototypes was ready in December of 1942, with testing beginning at the end of that year. No major problems were encountered; in fact the plane's performance was so satisfactory that it was decided to adapt it for torpedo duty as well. Some of these aircraft were later given to the Navy, where they were designated Yasukuni. The Ki-67 made its operational debut as a torpedo plane in October of 1944, during the combined air and naval battles off the coast of Formosa. Subsequently the Hiryu was used jointly by the army and navy in all major operational theaters. A total of 698 Ki-67s were built. Another aircraft was also derived from the Ki-67, which was a heavy fighter interceptor known as the Ki-109. Max speed: 334 MPH

    TORPEDO/BOMBER:
    The Aichi B7A Ryusei ("Falling Star") was designed to replace both the Nakajima B6N and the Yokosuka D4Y on aircraft carriers, but it never saw carrier duty. By the time the 114 planes became operative, the Japanese no longer had any operational aircraft carriers. The planes saw limited duty in the last months of the war with two land-based units. The Aichi B7A (known as "Grace" in the Allied code) was an exceptionally large plane for carrier service. Despite the fact that the project was begun in 1942 (with the first prototype taking to the air of May of 1942), the main production model, the B7A2, was finished two years later due to delays in engine procurement. By the time the assembly lines had been set up, it was too late, and only 105 Ryuseis were completed before war's end.
    Torpedo/Bombers, Grace: 351 MPH

  12. #2512

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Dinah

  13. #2513

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    I don't know about not beeing seen in numbers there were almost 900 MXY7-K1 Ohka's built.

  14. #2514

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: Evil_Merlin

    I don't know about not beeing seen in numbers there were almost 900 MXY7-K1 Ohka's built.

    Yes, but the delivery system got in the way of those actually making it to our ships. Truth is, I should have hung on a bunch of conditions to exclude the Ohka from the list as it was such a special purpose weapon. Sorry.... I should have been clear that I was looking to compare planes that would have tried to shoot each other down when they encountered each other.

    Good flying wit ya today

  15. #2515

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: Ram-bro

    Dinah

    Spot on.

    The Mitsubishi Ki-46-III-Kai (Dinah) was sort of WWII's "crossover vehicle" of the airwar. It was a twin engine that started life as a reconnaissance but got a 37mm pointing up and two 20mms pointing forward and told to go shoot down B-29s. Rigged for armed recon it would do 391mph @ 19,685' top speed. Still not as fast as the P-38.

    Good flying wit ya today

  16. #2516

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    OK, I believe I've recognized two winners. And by doing so, have sort of screwed up the orderly process here. It would make the thread a mess to turn it into a chain letter thing that had overlapping multiple question/answers going and increasing in number.

    So I'm going to suggest that whichever of the two winners posts first keeps the ball rolling. proptop and Ram-bro, the starters flag has dropped.
    Good flying wit ya today

  17. #2517
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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: da Rock

    OK, I believe I've recognized two winners. And by doing so, have sort of screwed up the orderly process here. It would make the thread a mess to turn it into a chain letter thing that had overlapping multiple question/answers going and increasing in number.

    So I'm going to suggest that whichever of the two winners posts first keeps the ball rolling. proptop and Ram-bro, the starters flag has dropped.


    Thanks da Rock,
    I would like to turn it over to Ram-bro...(or whomever/whoever youze guys choose )
    I have a rather busy schedule this week-end, so I won't be here much (if at all ) for the next couple of days...
    < Wrongway Feldman's Kreider-Reisner KR-21...(on Gilligan's Island)

  18. #2518

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    heck I was gonna give it to you prop top but I will come up witha question for the masses, give me a minute

  19. #2519

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    OK, here goes: What plane am I and what was the 1st forthis nation that this bomber performed?
    1.due to the crash of the competitions prototype , this bomber was selected as the winner of the flyoff
    2. this plane was essentially a modified transport aircraft
    3.this bomber had a 1st for the armed services of this nation
    4,

  20. #2520

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: Ram-bro

    OK, here goes: What plane am I and what was the 1st forthis nation that this bomber performed?
    1.due to the crash of the competitions prototype , this bomber was selected as the winner of the flyoff
    2. this plane was essentially a modified transport aircraft
    3.this bomber had a 1st for the armed services of this nation
    4,
    The Douglas B-18 Bolo. Thanks; Ernie P.

    Citation-

    The Douglas B-18 Bolo was a United States Army Air Corps and Royal Canadian Air Force bomber of the late 1930s and early 1940s. The Bolo was built by Douglas Aircraft Company and based on its DC-2 and was developed to replace the Martin B-10. By 1940 it was considered to be underpowered, to have inadequate defensive armament and carried too small a bomb load. Many were destroyed during the Pearl Harbor Attack and in the Philippines in early December 1941. By 1942 the survivors were relegated to antisubmarine or transport duty. A B-18 was the first American aircraft to sink a German U-Boat, the U-654 on 22 August 1942.

    In 1934, the United States Army Air Corps put out a request for a bomber with double the bomb load and range of the Martin B-10, which was just entering service as the Army's standard bomber. In the evaluation at Wright Field the following year, Douglas showed its DB-1. It competed with the Boeing Model 299 (later the B-17 Flying Fortress) and Martin Model 146. While the Boeing design was clearly superior, the crash of the B-17 prototype (caused by taking off with the controls locked) removed it from consideration. During the depths of the Great Depression, the lower price of the DB-1 ($58,500 vs. $99,620 for the Model 299) also counted in its favor. The Douglas design was ordered into immediate production in January 1936 as the B-18.

    The DB-1 design was essentially that of the DC-2, with several modifications. The wingspan was 4.5 ft (1.4 m) greater. The fuselage was deeper, to better accommodate bombs and the six-member crew; the wings were fixed in the middle of the cross-section rather than to the bottom, but this was due to the deeper fuselage. Added armament included nose, dorsal, and ventral gun turrets.

    The Bolos remaining in the continental USA and in the Caribbean were then deployed in a defensive role in anticipation of attacks on the US mainland. Fortunately, these attacks never materialized. B-17s supplanted B-18s in first-line service in 1942. Following this, 122 B-18As were modified for anti-submarine warfare. The bombardier was replaced by a search radar with a large radome. Magnetic anomaly detection (MAD) equipment was sometimes housed in a tail boom. These aircraft, designated B-18B, were used in the Caribbean on anti-submarine patrol.

    Two aircraft were transferred to Força Aérea Brasileira in 1942 and used with a provisional conversion training unit set up under the provisions of Lend-Lease. They were later used for anti-submarine patrols. They were struck off charge at the end of the war. The Royal Canadian Air Force acquired 20 B-18As (designated the Douglas Digby Mark I), and also used them for patrol duties. On 2 October 1942, a B-18A, piloted by Captain Howard Burhanna Jr. of the 99th Bomb Squadron, depth charged and sank the German U-boat U-512 north of Cayenne, French Guiana. Bolos and Digbys sank an additional two submarines during the course of the war. RCAF Eastern Air Command (EAC) Digbys carried out 11 attacks on U-boats. U-520 was confirmed sunk by Flying Officer F. Raymes' crew of No 10 (BR) Sqn, on 30 October 1942 east of Newfoundland.

    However, the antisubmarine role was relatively short lived, and the Bolos were superseded in this role in 1943 by the B-24 Liberator which had a substantially longer range and a much heavier payload.
    Surviving USAAF B-18s ended their useful lives in training and transport roles within the continental United States, and saw no further combat action. Two B-18As were modified as unarmed cargo transports under the designation C-58. At the end of the war, those bombers that were left were sold as surplus on the commercial market. Some postwar B-18s of various models were operated as cargo or crop-spraying aircraft by commercial operators.

  21. #2521

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Dang Ernie....where are you from man!........? That is corect the B18 Bolo. How did you get the answer so stinkin fast?

  22. #2522

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: Ram-bro

    Dang Ernie....where are you from man!........? That is corect the B18 Bolo. How did you get the answer so stinkin fast?
    Well; we all know the B-17 (Boeing Model 299, as it was so designated at the time) crashed in the original evaluation trials through what was clearly a pilot error; and therefore could not be accepted fully as the replacement for the Martin B-10 bomber. However, the Model 299 was also clearly the most advanced and promising of the competing designs. So, the Army ordered that development of the Model 299 would continue; even though it had lost the competition and the competing aircraft (which became the B-18) was ordered into production.

    I've always been somewhat bemused that the B-17 was rejected because it crashed and was eliminated from consideration; and the B-18 was ordered into production... although eventually the B-17 replaced the B-18. It always seemed counterintuitive, and it stuck in my mind.

    I'm trying to decide which of several questions I will ask; and the order of the clues. I'll be back in a few minutes and ask the next question. Thanks; Ernie P.

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Okay, Guys; I want to go fly RC warbirds. So, here's a softball question for all you heavy hitters. I just want to draw attention to one of the lesser known planes of WWII. A nice, simple question with no twists or misdirection. Enjoy. Thanks; Ernie P.

    Question:

    What aircraft do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) It was, quite simply, the largest warbird of WWII.


  24. #2524
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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    The BV 238 V1 prototype, bearing the four-letter Stammkennzeichen (factory radio code) of RO + EZ, first flew on 11 March 1944 after a first jump on 10 March 1944. Six 1,287 kW (1,750 hp) Daimler-Benz DB 603 inverted V12 piston engines were used in total, arranged in three forward-facing engine nacelles on each wing.
    The sole completed BV 238 was strafed and sunk while docked on Schaal Lake in September 1944 by three P-51 Mustangs of the 361st Fighter Group. Named "Detroit Miss", the lead Mustang was piloted by World War II ace Lieutenant Urban "Ben" Drew, and another was piloted by William D. Rogers. This represented the largest single aircraft to be destroyed during the war.
    Drew was told after the raid that he had destroyed a BV 222 Wiking (another large flying boat). He continued to believe this was the case until he was contacted by the BBC in 1974 for a documentary, and told that their research had determined that the aircraft he had destroyed was actually the BV 238 V1, undergoing flight tests at the seaplane base at Schaal Lake.
    Production of two other prototypes was begun but neither was finished. A ΒΌ-scale model of the BV 238 was made during the plane's development for testing. Known as the FGP 227, it made a forced landing during its first flight and did not provide any data to the program.[1]
    Look towards the Horizon......your death awaits you there So Enjoy today ,,,,,,

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: uncljoe

    The BV 238 V1 prototype, bearing the four-letter Stammkennzeichen (factory radio code) of RO + EZ, first flew on 11 March 1944 after a first jump on 10 March 1944. Six 1,287 kW (1,750 hp) Daimler-Benz DB 603 inverted V12 piston engines were used in total, arranged in three forward-facing engine nacelles on each wing.
    The sole completed BV 238 was strafed and sunk while docked on Schaal Lake in September 1944 by three P-51 Mustangs of the 361st Fighter Group. Named ''Detroit Miss'', the lead Mustang was piloted by World War II ace Lieutenant Urban ''Ben'' Drew, and another was piloted by William D. Rogers. This represented the largest single aircraft to be destroyed during the war.
    Drew was told after the raid that he had destroyed a BV 222 Wiking (another large flying boat). He continued to believe this was the case until he was contacted by the BBC in 1974 for a documentary, and told that their research had determined that the aircraft he had destroyed was actually the BV 238 V1, undergoing flight tests at the seaplane base at Schaal Lake.
    Production of two other prototypes was begun but neither was finished. A ΒΌ-scale model of the BV 238 was made during the plane's development for testing. Known as the FGP 227, it made a forced landing during its first flight and did not provide any data to the program.[1]
    Not the bird I had in mind, uncljoe. Yes, the BV 238 V1 prototype was the largest aircraft produced, as was stated in one of my earlier questions. But the warbird I had in mind was an operational aircraft, not a prototype.

    However, to be absolutely fair, your answer did mention the BV 222 Wiking; which IS the bird I had in mind. So, over to you for the next question. Check out the below; and you'll see the BV 222 was an interesting aircraft all in its own right. You're up, SIr. Thanks; Ernie P.



    Blohm & Voss BV 222

    Question:

    What aircraft do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) It was, quite simply, the largest warbird of WWII.

    (2) It was definitely a warbird; as it shot down an enemy aircraft. It was also the largest aircraft to shoot down an enemy aircraft during WWII.

    (3) On the other hand, it was also the largest aircraft to be shot down during WWII.

    (4) With its huge wingspan and tremendous weight, it was the largest operational aircraft of WWII.

    (5) Wingspan exceeded 150’; and its weight was over 65,000 pounds empty.

    (6) Only 13 were built.

    (7) It was also the largest flying boat of WWII.


    Blohm & Voss BV 222
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Jump to: navigation, search
    BV 222 Wiking


    The BV 222 Wiking in flight
    Role Flying boat
    Manufacturer Blohm & Voss

    First flight 7 September 1940
    Primary user Luftwaffe

    Number built 13


    The BV 222 Wiking in flight
    Role Flying boat
    Manufacturer Blohm & Voss

    First flight 7 September 1940
    Primary user Luftwaffe

    Number built 13
    The Blohm & Voss BV 222 Wiking (German: "Viking") was a large, six-engined German flying boat of World War II, and both the largest flying boat and largest aircraft to achieve operational status during the war. Originally designed as a commercial transport, and produced in only limited quantities, the aircraft was also the largest aircraft to shoot down an enemy aircraft during WWII, downing an American PB4Y Liberator, as well as the largest aircraft to be shot down during the War.



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