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Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

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Old 01-20-2011, 03:18 PM
  #4051  
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This aircraft never went into production. There were no prototypes completed. But, a lot of work and research was completed. Clue (2) is very important. Had this program come to fruition, it could have changed everything. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What proposed warbird program do I describe?

Clues:

(1) Although not a single prototype was completed, a tremendous amount of time, energy and money was expended on research.

(2) It was probably, at least at the time, the single most ambitious aircraft program ever undertaken.

(3) It may also have been the most expensive.

(4) Although the program was eventually cancelled as being “unfeasible”, there is doubt even to this day as to whether there may have been another reason for the decision.
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Old 01-20-2011, 05:02 PM
  #4052  
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North American XF-108 Rapier?
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Old 01-20-2011, 05:31 PM
  #4053  
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Default RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

No correct answers thus far. Remember; this was a proposal for a warbird. The program existed. Research was conducted. But, no aircraft were built. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What proposed warbird program do I describe?

Clues:

(1) Although not a single prototype was completed, a tremendous amount of time, energy and money was expended on research.

(2) It was probably, at least at the time, the single most ambitious aircraft program ever undertaken.

(3) It may also have been the most expensive.

(4) Although the program was eventually cancelled as being “unfeasible”, there is doubt even to this day as to whether there may have been another reason for the decision.

(5) Had the program been completed successfully, the result would have been an aircraft of staggering range and endurance.
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Old 01-20-2011, 05:46 PM
  #4054  
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Did the x-47b get cancelled? obviously not the right answer. How about the Junkers Ju 488
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Old 01-20-2011, 06:18 PM
  #4055  
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Default RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

Convair NB 36 The USAF utilizing nuclear propulsion to power an aircraft .
Semper Fi
Joe
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Old 01-21-2011, 12:50 AM
  #4056  
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ORIGINAL: uncljoe

Convair NB 36 The USAF utilizing nuclear propulsion to power an aircraft .
Semper Fi
Joe

Not quite the answer I wanted, uncljoe; but close enough you obviously have the right idea. So; I'll hand over the gavel to you, Sir. You are up! This was an incredibly ambitious project; an aircraft of almost unlimited range and endurance. Circling the globe would have been easy.

The decision was made that shielding the crew from the effects of radiation would make the bomber too heavy. Some have suggested the real reason for the cancellation was the eventual, almost unavoidable eventuality of a crash over US territory involving a nuclear powerplant. The widespread damage from a crashed bomber and a destroyed reactor could have been catastrophic. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What proposed warbird program do I describe?

Clues:

(1) Although not a single prototype was completed, a tremendous amount of time, energy and money was expended on research.

(2) It was probably, at least at the time, the single most ambitious aircraft program ever undertaken.

(3) It may also have been the most expensive.

(4) Although the program was eventually cancelled as being “unfeasible”, there is doubt even to this day as to whether there may have been another reason for the decision.

(5) Had the program been completed successfully, the result would have been an aircraft of staggering range and endurance.

(6) The program began in 1954. It was decided the proposed aircraft was unfeasible as an operational aircraft in 1956; although the project wasn’t cancelled until 1961.


Answer: The WS-125 or B-72

The WS-125 was a proposed super long range bomber, designed by the United States during the cold war. It was supposed to be a nuclear aircraft and was scheduled to be named as B-72.

In 1954, the USAF issued a weapons system requirement for a nuclear-powered bomber, designated WS-125. In 1956, GE teamed up with Convair (X211 program) and Pratt & Whitney with Lockheed in competitive engine/airframe development to address the requirement.

In 1956, the USAF decided that the proposed WS-125 bomber was unfeasible as an operational strategic aircraft. Finally, after spending more than 1 billion dollars, the project was canceled on March 28, 1961.

NEPA and ANP
Main article: Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion

In May, 1946, the Nuclear Energy for the Propulsion of Aircraft (NEPA) project was started by the United States Air Force. Studies under this program were done until May, 1951 when NEPA was replaced by the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion (ANP) program. The ANP program included provisions for studying two different types of nuclear-powered jet engines, General Electric's Direct Air Cycle and Pratt & Whitney's Indirect Air Cycle. ANP also contained plans for two B-36s to be modified by Convair under the MX-1589 project, one of the B-36s was to be used to study shielding requirements for an airborne reactor while the other was to be the X-6. The program was cancelled before the X-6 was completed, however.

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted research (Aircraft Reactor Experiment) to produce a nuclear powered aircraft. Two General Electric turbofan engines were successfully powered to nearly full thrust using two shielded reactors. The two engines complete with reactor system are currently located at the EBR-1 facility south of INL.

The U.S. designed these engines to be used in a new specially designed nuclear bomber, the WS-125. The WS-125 was eventually terminated by Eisenhower who cut NEPA and told Congress that there was no urgency for the program. Eisenhower did back a small scale program developing high temperature materials and high performance reactors. That program was terminated early in the Kennedy administration.
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Old 01-22-2011, 07:03 AM
  #4057  
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ORIGINAL: uncljoe

Convair NB 36 The USAF utilizing nuclear propulsion to power an aircraft .
Semper Fi
Joe
Uncljoe; you are up. Unless you post a question soon, I will open the floor to any one who has a question. Thanks; Ernie P.
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Old 01-22-2011, 07:41 AM
  #4058  
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Okay, Guys; uncljoe is having internet problems and can't post dependably. So, the floor is open to any one with a question. If no one posts a question in the next few hours, I'll post another one. Thanks; Ernie P.
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Old 01-22-2011, 11:22 AM
  #4059  
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Default RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

I dont have a good one ready but I can find one pretty quick.
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Old 01-22-2011, 01:47 PM
  #4060  
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ORIGINAL: psb667

I dont have a good one ready but I can find one pretty quick.


If you don't mind, psb667; since I have a softball ready, and you can save your's for your next turn, I'll go ahead and ask this one. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What American aviator do I describe?

Clues:

(1) The only American to achieve five or more aerial victories in a single encounter… twice.
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Old 01-22-2011, 03:43 PM
  #4061  
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Default RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

Loyd hamilton
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Old 01-22-2011, 06:57 PM
  #4062  
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ORIGINAL: psb667

Loyd hamilton

Ummmmm....... I don't think so, psb667. As far as I know, Lloyd Hamilton scored a total of ten victories in WWI; and never scored five in a single day. Maybe this will help. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What American aviator do I describe?

Clues:

(1) The only American to achieve five or more aerial victories in a single encounter… twice.

(2) On the first occasion, he shot down five enemy aircraft on a single sortie; then scored two more kills during a second sortie the same day.
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Old 01-22-2011, 07:43 PM
  #4063  
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Default RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

David McCampbell?
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Old 01-22-2011, 09:33 PM
  #4064  
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Default RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

Sorry I read the article wrong. 5 one day then five more over the course of a week.
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Old 01-23-2011, 02:30 AM
  #4065  
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ORIGINAL: tevans55

David McCampbell?

You got it, tevans55! And, you are up! You have 24 hours to post your question. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What American aviator do I describe?

Clues:

(1) The only American to achieve five or more aerial victories in a single encounter… twice.

(2) On the first occasion, he shot down five enemy aircraft on a single sortie; then scored two more kills during a second sortie the same day.

(3) On the second occasion, he landed with only two rounds total remaining in his guns. And, his plane had to be pushed away manually; because his fuel was exhausted.


Answer: Navy Commander David McCampbell.

On June 19, 1944, during the "Marianas Turkey Shoot," Commander McCampbell shot down five Japanese 'Judy' dive-bombers, to become an "ace in a day". Later that afternoon, during a second sortie, McCampbell flamed another two Zekes over Guam. On October 24, 1944, he became the only American airman to achieve "ace in a day" status twice. McCampbell and his wingman attacked a Japanese force of 60 aircraft. McCampbell shot down nine, setting a U.S. single mission aerial combat record. During this same action, his wingman downed another six Japanese warplanes. When he landed his Grumman F6F Hellcat aboard USS Langley (Essex's flight deck wasn't clear), his six machine guns had two rounds remaining and his airplane had to be manually released from the arrestor wire due to complete fuel exhaustion. Commander McCampbell received the Medal of Honor for both actions, becoming the only fast carrier task force pilot to be so honored.

The President of the United States in the name of The Congress takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to
McCAMPBELL, DAVID
Rank and Organization: Commander, United States Navy, Air Group 15. Place and Date: First and second battles of the Philippine Sea, June 19, 1944. Entered Service at: Florida. Born: January 16, 1910, Bessemer, Ala. Other Navy awards: Navy Cross, Silver Star, Legion of Merit, Distinguished Flying Cross with 2 Gold Stars, Air Medal.
Citation:
For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as commander, Air Group 15, during combat against enemy Japanese aerial forces in the first and second battles of the Philippine Sea. An inspiring leader, fighting boldly in the face of terrific odds, Comdr. McCampbell led his fighter planes against a force of 80 Japanese carrier-based aircraft bearing down on our fleet on June 19, 1944. Striking fiercely in valiant defense of our surface force, he personally destroyed 7 hostile planes during this single engagement in which the outnumbering attack force was utterly routed and virtually annihilated. During a major fleet engagement with the enemy on October 24, Comdr. McCampbell, assisted by but 1 plane, intercepted and daringly attacked a formation of 60 hostile land-based craft approaching our forces. Fighting desperately but with superb skill against such overwhelming airpower, he shot down 9 Japanese planes and, completely disorganizing the enemy group, forced the remainder to abandon the attack before a single aircraft could reach the fleet. His great personal valor and indomitable spirit of aggression under extremely perilous combat conditions reflect the highest credit upon Comdr. McCampbell and the U.S. Naval Service.

McCampbell formed VF-15 on September 1, 1943 and led the squadron before being assigned as Commander of Air Group Fifteen in February 1944 to September 1944. As Commander Air Group (CAG) 15, he was in charge of fighters, bombers, and torpedo bombers aboard the aircraft carrier USS Essex. From April to November 1944, his group saw six months of continuous combat and participated in two major air-sea battles, the First and Second Battles of the Philippine Sea. During the more than 20,000 hours of air combat operations before it returned to the United States for a rest period, Air Group 15 destroyed more enemy planes (315 airborne and 348 on the ground) and sank more enemy shipping than any other Air Group in the Pacific War. Air Group 15’s attacks on the Japanese in the Marianas and at Iwo Jima, Taiwan, and Okinawa were key to the success of the “island hopping” campaign.
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Old 01-23-2011, 06:13 AM
  #4066  
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Default RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

OK, this is my first shot at this.

What four actions were used by the USAAF or USAF to constitute an aerial victory in WWII? (try to list all 4 in the same post) Good Luck!

Hint: The action had to occur between 12/7/1941 and 9/2/1945
Hint: Only fighter pilots and members of night fighter crews were eligible
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Old 01-23-2011, 07:53 AM
  #4067  
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ORIGINAL: tevans55

OK, this is my first shot at this.

What four actions were used by the USAAF or USAF to constitute an aerial victory in WWII? (try to list all 4 in the same post) Good Luck!

Hint: The action had to occur between 12/7/1945 and 9/2/1945
Hint: Only fighter pilots and members of night fighter crews were eligible

Are you sure you have your dates correct? WWII ended with the signed of the unconditional surrender documents by Japan on September 2nd, 1945. Between then and 12/7/1945, there wasn't a lot of fighting. Did you perhaps mean "between 12/7/1944 and 9/2/1945"? Thanks; Ernie P.
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Old 01-23-2011, 08:02 AM
  #4068  
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I think its a typo, he most likely meant 12 / 7 / 1941 .
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Old 01-23-2011, 08:13 AM
  #4069  
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ORIGINAL: tevans55

OK, this is my first shot at this.

What four actions were used by the USAAF or USAF to constitute an aerial victory in WWII? (try to list all 4 in the same post) Good Luck!

Hint: The action had to occur between 12/7/1945 and 9/2/1945
Hint: Only fighter pilots and members of night fighter crews were eligible

Here you go. Thanks; Ernie P.


Because no single list of USAAF victory credits could be prepared during or at the end of World War II, many different lists, each compiled according to rules adopted in a theater or by a numbered air force, remained after the fighting ended. Air Force historians later integrated these victory records into a single list following a carefully prepared set of criteria. The United States Air Force (USAF) counted World War II aerial victory credits only for USAAF flyers, or Allied aviators who belonged to USAAF units.

(1) The action had to occur between December 7, 1941 and September 2, 1945. (2) Only fighter pilots or members of night fighter crews were eligible. (3) The enemy aircraft had to be airborne, heavier than air, manned, and armed. (4) Destruction involved shooting an enemy aircraft down, causing the pilot to bail out, intentionally ramming the airplane to make it crash, or maneuvering it into the ground or water. If the enemy airplane landed, despite its degree of damage, it was not counted as destroyed. (5) An eyewitness in another aircraft or gun camera film confirmed aerial victory credit claims.

USAAF officials then awarded credit, usually through the issuance of numbered air force general orders. An aerial victory credit board, of which there were several during the war, also documented credits. In 1957, the Department of the Air Force assigned responsibility for verifying aerial victory credits, including those of World War II, to the USAF Historical Division, predecessor of the Air Force Historical Research Agency.
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Old 01-23-2011, 08:15 AM
  #4070  
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ORIGINAL: tunakuts3d

I think its a typo, he most likely meant 12 / 7 / 1941 .
Yeah; that's what I figured; but I couldn't get back into RCU to correct my own typo (1944 re 1941) for a few minutes. (-: Jeeze.... Thanks; Ernie P.
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Old 01-23-2011, 08:25 AM
  #4071  
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Sorry for the typo guys...the system timed out on me and I got to typing fast and well, enough of my excuses. Ernie P got it so I guess it's back to you! Congrats.
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Old 01-23-2011, 09:48 AM
  #4072  
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ORIGINAL: tevans55

Sorry for the typo guys...the system timed out on me and I got to typing fast and well, enough of my excuses. Ernie P got it so I guess it's back to you! Congrats.

Don't sweat the small stuff, tevans55; I've done it myself more than a few times. I have another softball question, closely related to my last one. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What American aviator do I describe?

Clues:

(1) A noted movie star, he was probably the only person to act the part of a war hero and then become one.
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Old 01-23-2011, 10:21 AM
  #4073  
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Brigadier General Jimmy Stewart (later Major General)

Academy Award – 1941, “The Philadelphia Story”

Private Pilot License – 1935

Enlisted in the Army in March 1941. He became the first major American movie star to wear a military uniform in World War II.
Commissioned as Second Lieutenant – Jan. 1942

Instructor –B-17s – 1942

Assigned to the 445th Bombardment Group – August 1943 as Operations Office then as Captain, Commander. Flew B-24s on missions over Germany, including the October 14, 1943, bombing mission to Schweinfurt, which was the center of the German ball-bearing industry. This mission is known in USAF history as Black Thursday due to the high casualties it sustained; 60 aircraft were lost out of 291 B-17s dispatched unescorted to Schweinfurt. Promoted to Major while assigned to the 445th. Official number of missions “20”.

Reassigned to 453rd Bombardment Group – March 1944. Flew as Command Pilot in the Lead Bomber on numerous missions, these were not counted per Stewarts orders.

Received the Distinguished Flying Cross twice.

Awarded the Croix de Guerre.

Received the Air Medal with three oak leaf clusters

In July 1944, after flying 20 combat missions, Stewart was made Chief of Staff of the 2nd Combat Bombardment Wing of the Eighth Air Force, and though he was no longer required or expected to fly missions, he continued to do so.

Was promoted to Colonel before the war ended.

In 1966, Brigadier General James Stewart flew as a non-duty observer in a B-52 on a bombing mission during the Vietnam War.

Retired from the Air Force on May 31, 1968 after 27 years service.

Promoted to Major General by President Ronald Reagan

Information from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Stewart More info at the site.


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Old 01-23-2011, 10:25 AM
  #4074  
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Default RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

Same answer but a few minutes late...
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Old 01-23-2011, 10:50 AM
  #4075  
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Could also be Clark Gable; as he was a waist gunner in the European theater of action
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