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  1. #6776

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    A morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What warbird do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) One of the almost forgotten, but key aircraft of an earlier era.

    (2) It had three service lives; first as a bomber, then reconnaissance work, then again as a bomber.

    (3) It was the first of its type to be refueled in the air.

    (4) Only operated by two nations.

    (5) The first of its type in service with its host country.

    (6) A long series of engine problems continued throughout its lifespan.

    (7) Its birth came about as a result of aircraft development in a wartime foe.

    (8) Interestingly, it was replaced by not one, but two iconic bombers.

    (9) In the hands of an ally, this aircraft performed reconnaissance duties prohibited to its host country.

  2. #6777

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Martin B-57 Canberra??
    Kirby C.
    I gotta have more cowbell!

  3. #6778

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    How about this one Ernie?
    The North American B-45 Tornado was the United States Air Force's first operational jet bomber, and the first jet aircraft to be refueled in the air.[2][3] The B-45 was an important part of the United States's nuclear deterrent for several years in the early 1950s, but was rapidly succeeded by the Boeing B-47 Stratojet. B-45s and RB-45s served in the United States Air Force's Strategic Air Command from 1950 until 1959.

    Thanks , Zip.

  4. #6779

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: zippome

    How about this one Ernie?
    The North American B-45 Tornado was the United States Air Force's first operational jet bomber, and the first jet aircraft to be refueled in the air.http://<font size=&#39;&#39;2&#39;&#39;><span>&#91;</spa...</span></font>http://<font size=&#39;&#39;2&#39;&#39;><span>&#91;</spa...</span></font> The B-45 was an important part of the United States's nuclear deterrent for several years in the early 1950s, but was rapidly succeeded by the Boeing B-47 Stratojet. B-45s and RB-45s served in the United States Air Force's Strategic Air Command from 1950 until 1959.

    Thanks , Zip.
    Indeed, Sir. Good job, Zip; and you are up. The B-45 was the United States' first jet bomber; the first jet bomber to be air refeuled; and the first to fly non-stop across the Pacific. All in all, a very significant, although short-lived, bomber. It was replaced by the B-47 and B-58; both iconic bombers in their own right. The B-45 did yeoman work during the Korean Conflict; was used for strategic recon work by the RAF, when US law said we couldn't do such; and served as a key part of the US nuclear strike force. Thanks; Ernie P.



    Question: What warbird do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) One of the almost forgotten, but key aircraft of an earlier era.

    (2) It had three service lives; first as a bomber, then reconnaissance work, then again as a bomber.

    (3) It was the first of its type to be refueled in the air.

    (4) Only operated by two nations.

    (5) The first of its type in service with its host country.

    (6) A long series of engine problems continued throughout its lifespan.

    (7) Its birth came about as a result of aircraft development in a wartime foe.

    (8) Interestingly, it was replaced by not one, but two iconic bombers.

    (9) In the hands of an ally, this aircraft performed reconnaissance duties prohibited to its host country.

    (10) The reduced size and weight of nuclear weapons gave it a new strategic role.

    (11) Made the first non-stop flight across the Pacific, with the aid of mid-air refueling.


    Answer: The North American B-45 Tornado

    The North American B-45 Tornado was the United States Air Force's first operational jet bomber, and the first jet aircraft to be refueled in the air. The B-45 was an important part of the United States's nuclear deterrent for several years in the early 1950s, but was rapidly succeeded by the Boeing B-47 Stratojet. B-45s and RB-45s served in the United States Air Force's Strategic Air Command from 1950 until 1959.


    The B-45 began development in 1944, when the War Department, alarmed by German jet bombers like the Arado Ar 234, called for a new family of jet bombers grossing between 80,000 lb (36,287 kg) and 200,000 lb (90,718 kg). The North American proposal (NA-130) won, and on September 8, 1944, the company began production of three prototypes based on the NA-130.

    The end of World War II resulted in the cancellation of many projects and delayed many others. In 1946, rising tensions with the Soviet Union caused the Air Force to assign higher priorities to jet bomber development and production. By mid-1946, the XB-45 and Convair XB-46 neared completion, but the XB-47 and Martin XB-48 were still two years away. The USAAF chose to evaluate the first two designs to determine which would be superior operationally. The B-45 proved a superior design, and on January 2, 1947, a contract for immediate production of B-45As was signed. It had been planned to equip five light bomb groups and three light reconnaissance groups with B-45As but as the B-47's development and flight testing made future production all but certain, the B-45's future became increasingly uncertain and in mid 1948 the Air Staff actually began to question the B-45's value. Soon afterwards, President Truman's budget restraints reduced Air Force expenditure and B-45 production was reduced to total of 142 airframes. Further budget cuts in the FY 1950 forced the Aircraft and Weapons Board to cancel 51 of the 190 aircraft on order. It was later replaced by the supersonic Convair B-58 Hustler.

    Continuously plagued by engine problems along with numerous other minor flaws, the B-45 regained importance when the United States entered the Korean War in 1950 and would prove its value both as a bomber and in a reconnaissance role. The mass dedication of U.S. Forces to the Korean War revealed the vulnerability of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization forces in Europe to Soviet attack and it was in this light that the Air Force made an important decision about the future of the B-45. The B-45, like all post World War II U.S. bombers, could carry both nuclear and conventional bombs. The progress of weapons technology had led to a great reduction in the weight and size of nuclear weapons in U.S. inventory, effectively allowing smaller aircraft such as the B-45 to carry out nuclear strikes, a mission which had initially been limited to heavy bombers. Suddenly, the small fleet of B-45s had great value again as a nuclear deterrent.

    Operation Fandango, sometimes called Operation Backbreaker, entailed modifications to the aircraft for nuclear missions. In addition, the 40 B-45s allocated to the program also were equipped with a new defensive system and extra fuel tanks. Despite the magnitude of the modification project, plus ongoing problems with the early jet engines, atomic-capable B-45s began reaching the United Kingdom in May 1952, and deployment of the 40 aircraft was completed in mid June. It was at about this same time that RB-45s of the 323rd Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron began to arrive in Japan to fly alongside the 91st Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron, supplementing the WWII era piston engine RB-29s which had proved to be easy targets for North Korean MiGs. The RB-45s would provide valuable intelligence throughout the remainder of the Korean War despite the limited number of airframes which were available. RB-45Cs flew many daylight missions until early 1952, when they were converted to night operations after an RB-45 was almost lost to a MiG-15.


    All 33 RB-45Cs built were assigned to the 91st Strategic Reconnaissance Wing's 322nd, 323rd and 324th Strategic Reconnaissance Squadrons. The RB-45C also flew several long-range reconnaissance missions over the Soviet Union during the mid 1950s. On July 29, 1952, an RB-45C made the first non-stop Trans-Pacific flight, having been refueled twice by KB-29s along the way. Maj Lou Carrington and his crew of the 91st Reconnaissance Wing flew from Alaska to Japan in 9hrs 50mins, winning the MacKay Trophy for their achievement. Within the 91st SRW, by 1954 the RB-45C had been replaced by the RB-47E. The phased out RB-45Cs went to the 19th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron which operated them until being withdrawn from operational use in the spring of 1958.

    The only other nation to use the RB-45C was Britain, which were operated by an ad hoc unit of crews largely drawn from Nos. 35 and 115 squadrons. Four aircraft were bailed to Britain from the 91st Strategic Reconnaissance Wing to form a Royal Air Force (RAF) Special Duty Flight commanded by Squadron Leader John Crampton. With RAF markings, the four aircraft were attached to a USAF squadron based in RAF Sculthorpe, Norfolk, and the flight performed significant operations over the Soviet Union during a period when such USAF overflight operations were prohibited by the President of the United States.

    Three of the four RB-45C's carried out 'Operation Ju-jitsu' on April 17, 1952, overflying Russia at 36,000 feet and gathering electronic intelligence and photographs of the targets before returning to Sculthorpe ten hours later. On April 28, 1954 the three aircraft took off from Sculthorpe again, and on this occasion, Crampton's aircraft, heading for Kiev, was tracked by ground radar and came under anti-aircraft fire. Applying full power, he immediately turned and headed for Germany, none too soon as Soviet night fighters had been dispatched to hunt down his aircraft. Subsequent flights over the Soviet Union were carried out using English Electric Canberras under the codename 'Operation Robin', operating at higher altitudes of around 54,000 feet.

    By the end of the 1950s all B-45s were removed from active duty service. However, a few continued to act as test aircraft into the early 1970s.


  5. #6780

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Ok, Here we go.

    1. This aircraft had an unusual design to help fulfill a very common mission.
    2. It was so specialized that only 2 were built. 1 of which was the prototype that crashed and was destroyed.

    Okguys, have at it...
    Thanks ,
    Zip

  6. #6781

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: zippome

    Ok, Here we go.

    1. This aircraft had an unusual design to help fulfill a very common mission.
    2. It was so specialized that only 2 were built. 1 of which was the prototype that crashed and was destroyed.

    OkÂ*guys, have at it...
    Thanks ,
    Zip
    Sorry; can't resist anything straight over the plate. The M-21/D-21 variant of the A-12 recon platform would seem to fit. Thanks; Ernie P.


    One notable variant of the basic A-12 design was the M-21, used to carry and launch the Lockheed D-21, an unmanned, faster and higher-flying reconnaissance drone. The M-21 was a modified version of the A-12 with a second cockpit for a Launch Control Operator/Officer (LCO) in the place of the A-12's Q bay; the M-21 also included a pylon on its back for mounting the drone. The D-21 was completely autonomous; after being launched it would overfly the target, travel to a predetermined rendezvous point and eject its data package. The package would be recovered in midair by a C-130 Hercules and the drone would self-destruct.

    The program to develop this system was canceled in 1966 after a drone collided with the mother ship at launch, destroying the M-21. The crew survived the midair collision but the LCO drowned when he landed in the ocean and his flight suit filled with water. The modified D-21B drone was carried on a pylon under the wing of the B-52 bomber. The drone performed operational missions over China from 1969 to 1971.

    The Lockheed D-21 was an American Mach 3+ reconnaissance drone. The D-21 was initially designed to be launched from the back of its M-21 carrier aircraft, a variant of the Lockheed A-12 aircraft. Development began in October 1962. Originally known by the Lockheed designation Q-12, the drone was intended for reconnaissance missions deep in enemy airspace.

    The D-21 was designed to carry a single high-resolution photographic camera over a preprogrammed path, then release the camera module into the air for retrieval, after which the drone would self-destruct. Following a fatal accident when launched from an M-21, the D-21 was modified to be launched from a Boeing B-52 Stratofortress. Only four operational D-21 flights were made over the People's Republic of China before the program was canceled in 1971.

  7. #6782

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    OOoooo A rare swing and a miss by Ernie!

    1. This aircraft had an unusual design to help fulfill a very common mission.
    2. It was so specialized that only 2 were built. 1 of which was the prototype that crashed and was destroyed.
    3. This aircraft had a crew of 2 and a top speed of 118 mph. Range 249 miles, and a service ceiling of 16405 ft.

    more clues tomorrow if noone gets it by then!
    Thanks, Zip.

  8. #6783

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: zippome

    OOoooo A rare swing and a miss by Ernie!

    1. This aircraft had an unusual design to help fulfill a very common mission.
    2. It was so specialized that only 2 were built. 1 of which was the prototype that crashed and was destroyed.
    3. This aircraft had a crew of 2 and a top speed of 118 mph. Range 249 miles, and a service ceiling of 16405 ft.

    more clues tomorrow if noone gets it by then!
    Thanks, Zip.
    Oops... Slider. I'm always a sucker for those. Thanks; Ernie P.

  9. #6784

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Besson MB.411?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Besson_MB.411

    That's really interesting: An aircraft designed to be carried on a "submarine cruiser" to act as an artillery spotter for the big guns on the sub.

  10. #6785

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Thats It ! Good Job JohnnyS! The Besson MB.411. WIth its vertical stabilizer mounted underneath the fuselage to fit in the "Hanger". The underwater cruiser 'Sarcouf' led an interesting, if short life. It was sunk in 1942 under unusual, and disputed cicumstances. The Besson MB.411 was not on board at the time of it's sinking, and was then relegated to mundane service aboard surface vessels.
    Thanks!
    Zip.
    Ok JohnnyS, You're UP!

  11. #6786

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Here's a photo...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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  12. #6787

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: JohnnyS

    Besson MB.411?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Besson_MB.411

    That's really interesting: An aircraft designed to be carried on a ''submarine cruiser'' to act as an artillery spotter for the big guns on the sub.
    JohnnyS; that was a really good solve. Congratulations. I knew all about the Surcouf; but didn't even think about the aircraft she carried. Thanks; Ernie P.

  13. #6788

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz



    New aircraft:

    1. it was designed and built by Canadians during the second world war.

    2. It was very easy to fly: Too easy in fact, as it was supposed to be an intermediate trainer and didn't sufficiently challenge student pilots before they went on to fly more advanced aircraft.

  14. #6789

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: JohnnyS



    New aircraft:

    1. it was designed and built by Canadians during the second world war.

    2. It was very easy to fly: Too easy in fact, as it was supposed to be an intermediate trainer and didn't sufficiently challenge student pilots before they went on to fly more advanced aircraft.
    JohnnyS; I only know of one aircraft designed and built in Canada during WWII; but, it seems to fit: The Fleet Fort. Thanks; Ernie P.


    The Fleet Model 60K Fort was the only aircraft designed and built by Canadians during the Second World War and was also the first all-metal monoplane built by Fleet Aircraft of Canada (Fort Erie). It was intended to be an intermediate trainer employed for pilot training between the de Havilland Tiger Moth primary trainer and the North American Harvard advanced trainer. Although it served with the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan, the Fort was redundant and was used to train wireless (radio) operators and had a relatively short operational career.

    The Fort was originally designed as an advanced flying trainer and in 1940 orders were placed for 200 to be built for the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan. The Fleet 60 was designed as a monoplane with a low elliptical wing and a raised rear cockpit. An unusual feature was the fixed undercarriage. Although fixed, the undercarriage was fitted with a retractable fairing. This feature was intended to familiarize student pilots with an undercarriage retraction mechanism but without causing external damage by a forgetful student.
    Production was delayed, however, as the first Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) model was not flying until 18 April 1941. The availability of the Fairchild Cornell, and a change in what constituted an "advanced" trainer, led to the contract's being sharply cut back, and only 101 Forts were ultimately delivered to the RCAF between June 1941 and June 1942.

    Initially, the RCAF did not want to order the Model 60K, and their concerns proved valid. Pilot trainees found the Fort relatively easy to master, thereby making it unsuitable for transition to combat aircraft (e.g., Hawker Hurricane). Also, the RCAF decided that pilots who had soloed in Fleet Finches and de Havilland Tiger Moths could proceed to Harvards without training on Forts. The Forts were then used to train wireless operators at No. 2 Wireless School, Calgary and No. 3 Wireless School, Winnipeg.
    Two models were built, one having a 250 hp (190 kW) Jacobs engine and the other having a 330 hp (250 kW) Jacobs. The more powerful engine gave the revised Fort a top speed of 193 mph (311 km/h) and the cruising speed 163 mph (262 km/h). It then climbed at 1,650 feet (500 m) per minute and had a range of 610 miles (980 km). Loaded weight was slightly increased to 2,900 pounds (1,300 kg).
    The last Forts saw active service in 1944 and they were phased out of use by 1945; the last Model 60K was retired in 1946.


  15. #6790

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    That's it!

    Please go ahead with a new aircraft.

  16. #6791

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: JohnnyS

    That's it!

    Please go ahead with a new aircraft.
    Thank you, Sir. Let's go from old to old, yet new. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What active warbird do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) Introduced in the mid 1960s.

    (2) Still operational today.

  17. #6792

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Northrop F-5
    Kirby C.
    I gotta have more cowbell!

  18. #6793

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    F-111?

  19. #6794

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    A couple of good answers, but none correct. As I will not return until late tonight, I'll give you two early morning clues. Good luck! Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What active warbird do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) Introduced in the mid 1960s.

    (2) Still operational today.

    (3) Flies very specialized mission.

    (4) Involved in aerial refueling.

  20. #6795
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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    KC 135

    Semper Fi
    Joe
    Look towards the Horizon......your death awaits you there So Enjoy today ,,,,,,

  21. #6796

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    No correct answers thus far. This may help. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What active warbird do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) Introduced in the mid 1960s.

    (2) Still operational today.

    (3) Flies very specialized mission.

    (4) Involved in aerial refueling.

    (5) Fewer than 100 built.

  22. #6797

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    KC130 ?
    Thanks,
    Zip

  23. #6798

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: zippome

    KC130 ?
    Thanks,
    Zip
    No; not a KC-130. But you're getting warmer. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What active warbird do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) Introduced in the mid 1960s.

    (2) Still operational today.

    (3) Flies very specialized mission.

    (4) Involved in aerial refueling.

    (5) Fewer than 100 built.

    (6) Based upon a much more common transport aircraft.

  24. #6799

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    This should definitely narrow it down. Probably. Maybe. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What active warbird do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) Introduced in the mid 1960s.

    (2) Still operational today.

    (3) Flies very specialized mission.

    (4) Involved in aerial refueling.

    (5) Fewer than 100 built.

    (6) Based upon a much more common transport aircraft.

    (7) Very involved in education and training activities.


  25. #6800
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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    KC 10
    Look towards the Horizon......your death awaits you there So Enjoy today ,,,,,,


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