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  1. #7676

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    All good guesses but not what I'm looking for... and Ernie, your summary is correct and nuclear weapons are not the answer.

    Now for something a little different.

    1. Now universal in military aircraft, this development in aviation gave one air force an edge over others though possibly not for the right reason.
    2. Without it the course of history might have been very different... (now that's a sweeping statement)
    3. Very successfully used in previous applications, it's initial deployment in aircraft was not a complete success but when it worked it was very effective.

  2. #7677
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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Radar

  3. #7678
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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Retractable landing gear
    In God I trust.
    All others pay cash.

  4. #7679

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Good guesses again but not what I'm looking for...

    Now for something a little different.

    1. Now universal in military aircraft, this development in aviation gave one air force an edge over others though possibly not for the right reason.
    2. Without it the course of history might have been very different... (now that's a sweeping statement)
    3. Very successfully used in previous applications, it's initial deployment in aircraft was not a complete success but when it worked it was very effective.
    4. The solution to the early problems was developed after the conflict.
    5. In itself a passive device, it lead to a new form of tactical warfare.

  5. #7680

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: SimonCraig1

    Good guesses again but not what I'm looking for...

    Now for something a little different.

    1. Now universal in military aircraft, this development in aviation gave one air force an edge over others though possibly not for the right reason.
    2. Without it the course of history might have been very different... (now that's a sweeping statement)
    3. Very successfully used in previous applications, it's initial deployment in aircraft was not a complete success but when it worked it was very effective.
    4. The solution to the early problems was developed after the conflict.
    5. In itself a passive device, it lead to a new form of tactical warfare.

    Are you referencing the ability of British night bombers and fighters to detect the radar carried by German night fighters; either to avoid the German fighter, or to track it down and destroy it? Thanks; Ernie P.


    Later in the war, Mosquito night intruders were fitted with AI Mk VIII and later derivatives, which, along with a device called "Serrate" to allow them to track down German night fighters from their Lichtenstein signal emissions, as well as a device named "Perfectos" that tracked German IFF, allowed the Mosquito to find and destroy German night fighters. As a countermeasure the German night fighters employed Naxos ZR signal detectors.

    Serrate was an Allied radar detection and homing device, used in Allied nightfighters to track German night fighters equipped with the earlier UHF-band BC and C-1 versions of the Lichtenstein radar during World War II.

    No. 141 Squadron RAF, commanded by Wing Commander J. R. "Bob" Braham and flying the Bristol Beaufighter, commenced operations over Germany in support of the Bomber Offensive from 14 June to 7 September 1943. 179 operational sorties yielded 14 claimed fighters shot down, for 3 losses.

    The technique developed was for the RAF nightfighters to fly slowly off the bomber stream, mimicking the characteristics of a heavy bomber, until the rearward-facing Serrate detector picked up the emissions from a Luftwaffe night fighter approaching. The Radar Operator would then pass directions to the pilot until the fighter was 6,000 feet behind, at which point the Beaufighter would execute a swift turn onto the tail of the German night fighter, pick up the enemy aircraft on his forward radar and attempt to down it.

    Serrate was also subsequently fitted to de Havilland Mosquito nightfighters.

    No. 141 Squadron transferred to No. 100 Group Bomber Command in late 1943 and during the Battle of Berlin on the night of 16/17 December, a Mosquito crewed by Squadron Leader F. F. Lambert and Flying Officer K. Dear made Bomber Command's first successful Serrate-guided operational sortie when they damaged a Bf 110 with cannon-fire. The Serrate night fighter offensive preceded far greater and wide-ranging support operations by the specialist 100 Group during 1944-45.


  6. #7681

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    The parachute?

  7. #7682

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Infra-red or low light vision equipment?
    Thanks.
    Zip

  8. #7683

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: SimonCraig1

    Good guesses again but not what I'm looking for...

    Now for something a little different.

    1. Now universal in military aircraft, this development in aviation gave one air force an edge over others though possibly not for the right reason.
    2. Without it the course of history might have been very different... (now that's a sweeping statement)
    3. Very successfully used in previous applications, it's initial deployment in aircraft was not a complete success but when it worked it was very effective.
    4. The solution to the early problems was developed after the conflict.
    5. In itself a passive device, it lead to a new form of tactical warfare.
    Wait.... what's the biggest asset the USAF has right now? AWACS? Thanks; Ernie P.


    As part of their early use of radar, the British developed a radar set that could be carried on an aircraft for "Air Controlled Interception". The intention was to cover the North West approaches where German long range Fw 200 Condor aircraft were a threat to shipping. A Vickers Wellington bomber (serial R1629) was fitted with a rotating antenna array. It was trialled for use against aerial targets and then for possible use against German E boats. Another installation was a radar equipped Wellington used to direct Bristol Beaufighters onto Heinkel He 111s, which were air-launching V-1 flying bombs.

    In February 1944 the U.S. Navy ordered the development of a radar system that could be carried aloft in an aircraft as Project Cadillac. A prototype system was built and flown in August on a modified TBM Avenger torpedo bomber. Tests proved successful, with the system being able to detect low flying formations at a range in excess of 100 miles (160 km). The U.S. Navy then ordered production of the TBM-3W, the first production AEW aircraft to enter service. TBM-3Ws fitted with the AN/APS-20 radar entered service in March 1945, with some 36–40 eventually being constructed.

    In 1958, the Soviet Tupolev Design Bureau was also ordered to design an AEW aircraft. After trying to fit the projected radar instrumentation in a Tu-95 and a Tupolev Tu-116, the decision was made to use the Tu-114 fuselage instead. This solved the problems with cooling and operator space that existed with the narrower Tu-95 and Tu-116 fuselage. To meet the flight range requirements, the plane was fitted with an air-to-air refueling receiver. The resulting plane, the Tu-126, was used by the Soviet Air Forces until it was replaced by the Beriev A-50 in 1984.

    Many countries have developed their own AEW&C systems, although the Boeing E-3 Sentry and Northrop Grumman E-2 Hawkeye are the most common systems worldwide. The E-3 Sentry was built by the Boeing Defense and Space Group (now Boeing Defense, Space & Security) and is based on the Boeing 707-320 aircraft. 65 E-3 were built and it is operated by NATO and four nations. The specially designed Grumman E-2 Hawkeye entered service in 1965 and has been operated by eight different nations. Over 168 have been produced so far and new versions continue to be developed making it the most widely used AEW system. For the Japan Air Self-Defense Force, the E-3 technology has been fitted into the Boeing E-767.


  9. #7684

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    It's is not often you stump Ernie, but JonnyS wins the prize! Parachute is the answer...

    Parachutes had been used by balloon observers for at least two years before the were used with aircrew.

    The Central Powers began using the parachute for pilots in 1918. While the Allies had the technology the powers that be decided that having an ‘easy’ way out would reduce the ‘fighting spirit’ of the pilots. The same leadership thought that 60,000 casualties on the first day of the Battle of the Somme was a reasonable result. Compared to that, what are a few hundred? pilots/observers in the great scheme of things.

    The parachutes used had fixed lines and as a result the pilot sometimes got stuck in the rigging and plummeted to his death but compared with jumping sans chute or blowing you brains out if the plane was on fire it represented a major leap forwards and could be argued to give the pilot a more aggressive spirit than without it.

    Hermann Göring, would have been a footnote in history (and possible a question on this forum) if had not survived ‘balling out’ in 1918. Without his support in the 1920’s a certain corporal might never have been seen in public, without his intervention, the Battle of Britain may have had a very different outcome.

    Irvine developed the deployable parachute which saves thousands of aircrew over the the course of WWII and since. Not to mention recent world records.

    Paratroop assault troops were first introduce by the Soviet Union, though most general staff that advocated such mobile tactics were 'purged' in the 1930s. The Axis and Allies had major successes and failures with airborne assaults.

  10. #7685

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Thank you sir.

    I will try to come up with a new question tomorrow.

  11. #7686

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    New question:

    1. Exported to Spain, Sweden and Romania.

    2. Retired in 1960.

    3. Seaplane.

  12. #7687
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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Do-24
    In God I trust.
    All others pay cash.

  13. #7688

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    ORIGINAL: SimonCraig1

    It's is not often you stump Ernie, but JonnyS wins the prize! Parachute is the answer...

    Parachutes had been used by balloon observers for at least two years before the were used with aircrew.

    The Central Powers began using the parachute for pilots in 1918. While the Allies had the technology the powers that be decided that having an ‘easy’ way out would reduce the ‘fighting spirit’ of the pilots. The same leadership thought that 60,000 casualties on the first day of the Battle of the Somme was a reasonable result. Compared to that, what are a few hundred? pilots/observers in the great scheme of things.

    The parachutes used had fixed lines and as a result the pilot sometimes got stuck in the rigging and plummeted to his death but compared with jumping sans chute or blowing you brains out if the plane was on fire it represented a major leap forwards and could be argued to give the pilot a more aggressive spirit than without it.

    Hermann Göring, would have been a footnote in history (and possible a question on this forum) if had not survived ‘balling out’ in 1918. Without his support in the 1920’s a certain corporal might never have been seen in public, without his intervention, the Battle of Britain may have had a very different outcome.

    Irvine developed the deployable parachute which saves thousands of aircrew over the the course of WWII and since. Not to mention recent world records.

    Paratroop assault troops were first introduce by the Soviet Union, though most general staff that advocated such mobile tactics were 'purged' in the 1930s. The Axis and Allies had major successes and failures with airborne assaults.
    The background on British (or Allied) refusal to issue parachutes to their pilots is not quite as silly as it is portrayed. The simple facts are the Germans only began issuing parachutes to their pilots in the spring of 1918. By the end of the war, half a year later, the British were preparing to do the same. Only the end of the war stopped them. Less than 40 German scout pilots were issued and attempted to use a parachute to escape... and not nearly all were successful. These were not "backpack" parachutes. They were attached to the fuselage of the aircraft. Cockpits of the time didn't allow room for the parachutes of the day.

    Yes, the British had a prohibition against the use of parachutes by their pilots. But it was a very shortsighted, and very short lived, prohibition. Thanks; Ernie P.

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    New clue:

    1. Exported to Spain, Sweden and Romania.

    2. Retired in 1960.

    3. Seaplane.

    4. Biplane.

  15. #7690

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: JohnnyS

    New clue:

    1. Exported to Spain, Sweden and Romania.

    2. Retired in 1960.

    3. Seaplane.

    4. Biplane.

    I don't know that it was actually exported to Spain, but the Heinkel He 114 did serve until 1960 with Romania and was exported to Sweden. It was used by Spain, but not sure exactly how Spain acquired the planes. Thanks; Ernie P.


    The Heinkel He 114 was a biplane reconnaissance seaplane produced for the Kriegsmarine in the 1930s for use from warships. It replaced the company's He 60, but did not remain in service long before being replaced in turn by the Arado Ar 196 as Germany's standard spotter aircraft.

    While the fuselage and flotation gear of the He 114 were completely conventional, its wing arrangement was highly unusual. The upper set of wings was attached to the fuselage with a set of cabane struts, as in a parasol wing monoplane, whereas the lower set was of much lesser span while having approximately the same chord.

    The He 114 was never a great success, was not built in large numbers, and served with the Luftwaffe for only a short time. While the He 60 had handled very well on the water but been sluggish in the air, the He 114's handling while afloat was poor and its performance in the air scarcely better than the aircraft it replaced.
    12 aircraft were exported to Sweden (where they were designated S 12) and 24 to Romania, where the last 8 remained in service until 1 May 1960.

    Operators
    Germany
    Luftwaffe
    Romania
    Royal Romanian Air Force
    Romanian Air Force - Postwar.
    Spain
    Spanish Air Force
    Sweden
    Swedish Air Force


  16. #7691

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    And, as usual, Ernie P has it right!!

    See here for the Spain reference: http://www.warbirdsresourcegroup.org/LRG/he114.html

    You're up!

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: JohnnyS

    And, as usual, Ernie P has it right!!

    See here for the Spain reference: http://www.warbirdsresourcegroup.org/LRG/he114.html

    You're up!
    Thank you, Sir. I hope this question sets you all to thinking, but it may well be that one of you will nail it right out of the box. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What ace do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) If any one ace can lay claim to the title of “iron man”, this ace certainly has to be among the chief competitors.

  18. #7693

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Bader ?

  19. #7694

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: pilotal

    Bader ?
    No, not Bader. Certainly Bader was one tough customer, but this ace may have been even tougher. Try again, please. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What ace do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) If any one ace can lay claim to the title of “iron man”, this ace certainly has to be among the chief competitors.

    (2) If any one ace can lay claim to the title of “patriot”, this ace certainly has to be among the chief competitors.

  20. #7695
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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Robert Stanford Tuck?
    Fleet Brotherhood #5
    Half A Wing, Three Engines and A Prayer

  21. #7696

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    saburo sakei ?

  22. #7697

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    If we're banding about Battle of Britain aces, how about James 'Ginger' Lacey who despite flying Hurricanes amassed an impressive record against Bf109s?

    If you have a spare hour, there is a really interesting interview with him the BBC archives

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/archive/battleo...in/11418.shtml

  23. #7698

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    No correct answers thus far. This ace is perhaps less heralded than those mentioned, but he was a true ace and one who suffered greatly in his career. Perhaps this evening clue will help. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What ace do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) If any one ace can lay claim to the title of “iron man”, this ace certainly has to be among the chief competitors.

    (2) If any one ace can lay claim to the title of “patriot”, this ace certainly has to be among the chief competitors.

    (3) If any one ace can lay claim to having “overcome adversity”, this ace certainly has to be among the chief competitors.

  24. #7699
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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Alexander Pokryshkin? At least twice had to overcome near court martials due to his open distain for the official tactics.

    59 confirmed
    6 assits

    Known for always going straight after the lead aircraft (usually the most skilled combat pilot) in an attempt to weaken the remaining pilots moral.

    Preferred the Bell P-39 over even the more advanced Russian aircraft due to the massive firepower of the Airacobra. Quoted as saying when he let loose a burst with the cannon and all guns the aircraft in front of him would instantly disintegrate.
    The three most useless things to a pilot, the sky above you, the runway behind you, and the fuel on the ground.

  25. #7700

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: cfircav8r

    Alexander Pokryshkin? At least twice had to overcome near court martials due to his open distain for the official tactics.

    59 confirmed
    6 assits

    Known for always going straight after the lead aircraft (usually the most skilled combat pilot) in an attempt to weaken the remaining pilots moral.

    Preferred the Bell P-39 over even the more advanced Russian aircraft due to the massive firepower of the Airacobra. Quoted as saying when he let loose a burst with the cannon and all guns the aircraft in front of him would instantly disintegrate.
    No, afraid not; although I really like your answer. That would make a good question down the line. Since I'm feeling generous, here's another clue. Don't overthink it, guys. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What ace do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) If any one ace can lay claim to the title of “iron man”, this ace certainly has to be among the chief competitors.

    (2) If any one ace can lay claim to the title of “patriot”, this ace certainly has to be among the chief competitors.

    (3) If any one ace can lay claim to having “overcome adversity”, this ace certainly has to be among the chief competitors.

    (4) He was injured and wounded several times.


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