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  1. #7701

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    robin olds?
    \"any crash you can walk away from is a good crash\" Launch pad Mcquack

  2. #7702

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: psb667

    robin olds?
    No, not Olds. Try again, please. This early morning clue may help. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What ace do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) If any one ace can lay claim to the title of “iron man”, this ace certainly has to be among the chief competitors.

    (2) If any one ace can lay claim to the title of “patriot”, this ace certainly has to be among the chief competitors.

    (3) If any one ace can lay claim to having “overcome adversity”, this ace certainly has to be among the chief competitors.

    (4) He was injured and wounded several times.

    (5) Yet each time but one, he returned to action after injuries that would have sidelined many men.

  3. #7703

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Another morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What ace do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) If any one ace can lay claim to the title of “iron man”, this ace certainly has to be among the chief competitors.

    (2) If any one ace can lay claim to the title of “patriot”, this ace certainly has to be among the chief competitors.

    (3) If any one ace can lay claim to having “overcome adversity”, this ace certainly has to be among the chief competitors.

    (4) He was injured and wounded several times.

    (5) Yet each time but one, he returned to action after injuries that would have sidelined many men.

    (6) He was considered to be both fearless and completely ruthless in combat.

  4. #7704

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Rudolf Berthold?

    As one of the most successful German fighter pilots of World War I Hauptmann Rudolf Berthold was victorious in forty-four aerial combats. He was also shot down or forced to land after six fights and survived crash landings in every case. Early in World War I, when only fighter pilots were awarded the Kingdom of Prussia's (and de facto, Imperial Germany's ) highest bravery decoration, the Pour le Merite, Rudolf Berthold became the tenth recipient of the honour. Of that early cohort of air heroes, only Berthold and one other pilot survived the war. This book tells his remarkable story. Six weeks into the war, Berthold became the first airman in the 2nd Army area to be awarded an Iron Cross in recognition of his bravery and tenacity in combat. The symbolism of the award was appropriate. Described by one of his pilot proteges as, 'an Iron Man - with an absolutely unbendable iron will', he was a dedicated patriot. And, after he became a fighter pilot, he demonstrated a fierce fighting spirit in many encounters with British and French adversaries. All of his aerial combats with other Pour le Merite flyers are detailed in this book. Indeed, Berthold was so relentless in his approach to aerial combat, when badly wounded, on at least six occasions, he cut short his convalescent leave to return to flying with his comrades. This included a hit to his right arm, which shattered the bone, rendering it useless - undaunted Berthold taught himself to fly using his left. Peter Kilduff has produced a landmark volume based on extensive research into Rudolf Berthold's life and military career to form the most complete account yet about Germany's sixth highest scoring fighter ace of WWI. Illustrated with over eighty photographs and other artworks, many of which have never been published before, Iron Man tells the tale of this ruthless, fearless and, above all, very patriotic fighter whose perseverance and bravery made him one of the most famous airmen of World War I.

    http://www.amazon.ca/Iron-Man-Bertho.../dp/1908117370
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rudolf_Berthold

  5. #7705

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: JohnnyS

    Rudolf Berthold?

    As one of the most successful German fighter pilots of World War I Hauptmann Rudolf Berthold was victorious in forty-four aerial combats. He was also shot down or forced to land after six fights and survived crash landings in every case. Early in World War I, when only fighter pilots were awarded the Kingdom of Prussia's (and de facto, Imperial Germany's ) highest bravery decoration, the Pour le Merite, Rudolf Berthold became the tenth recipient of the honour. Of that early cohort of air heroes, only Berthold and one other pilot survived the war. This book tells his remarkable story. Six weeks into the war, Berthold became the first airman in the 2nd Army area to be awarded an Iron Cross in recognition of his bravery and tenacity in combat. The symbolism of the award was appropriate. Described by one of his pilot proteges as, 'an Iron Man - with an absolutely unbendable iron will', he was a dedicated patriot. And, after he became a fighter pilot, he demonstrated a fierce fighting spirit in many encounters with British and French adversaries. All of his aerial combats with other Pour le Merite flyers are detailed in this book. Indeed, Berthold was so relentless in his approach to aerial combat, when badly wounded, on at least six occasions, he cut short his convalescent leave to return to flying with his comrades. This included a hit to his right arm, which shattered the bone, rendering it useless - undaunted Berthold taught himself to fly using his left. Peter Kilduff has produced a landmark volume based on extensive research into Rudolf Berthold's life and military career to form the most complete account yet about Germany's sixth highest scoring fighter ace of WWI. Illustrated with over eighty photographs and other artworks, many of which have never been published before, Iron Man tells the tale of this ruthless, fearless and, above all, very patriotic fighter whose perseverance and bravery made him one of the most famous airmen of World War I.

    http://www.amazon.ca/Iron-Man-Bertho.../dp/1908117370
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rudolf_Berthold

    That's the man, JohnnyS; Rudolf Berthold. Actually, I was unaware of the book "Iron Man Berthold". I'll have to read it. I came across the details of his exploits in another book I read recently.

    In an era of wooden and canvas airplanes, and iron men, Berthold stands almost alone in his courage, patriotism, resolute determination and will. I encourage everyone to read the story of this man. The details of his wounds and his suffering, and his determination to get back into combat, are incredible.

    Okay, JohnnyS; you're up. Thanks; Ernie P.

    Question: What ace do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) If any one ace can lay claim to the title of “iron man”, this ace certainly has to be among the chief competitors.

    (2) If any one ace can lay claim to the title of “patriot”, this ace certainly has to be among the chief competitors.

    (3) If any one ace can lay claim to having “overcome adversity”, this ace certainly has to be among the chief competitors.

    (4) He was injured and wounded several times.

    (5) Yet each time but one, he returned to action after injuries that would have sidelined many men.

    (6) He was considered to be both fearless and completely ruthless in combat.

    (7) Although he started as a soldier, he learned to fly at his own expense and switched to the air force when war began.

    (8) He served through the entire war.

    (9) Although, he finished the war in the hospital.

    (10) His personal aircraft may be as well, or even better, known that its pilot.

    (11) He was already an ace when he suffered a bad crash. A broken nose and leg, along with a fractured pelvis, put him in the hospital for several months.

    (12) He returned to combat, and started running up his score. Then he was wounded in combat. His skull was fractured, and his leg, pelvis and nose broken.

    (13) Again, he returned to combat; and again he started running up his score. An enemy bullet shattered the bones in his right arm; and he lost the use of the arm. He refused surgery, even to have the bullet removed, as he was afraid surgery would leave him unable to fly. The wound never completely healed, and he suffered constant and horrific pain from the infection.

    (13) He taught himself to fly (and write), using only his left hand.

    (14) Again he returned to combat, and again he started rinning up his score.

    (15) Then, he collided with one of his victims. He crashed heavily, further injuring his right arm. He announced his intention to return to action, since the right arm had already been useless.

    (16) Only the direct intervention of his monarch prevented him leaving the hospital and returning to combat.

    (17) His reasoning was that his re-injured arm was already useless, so what difference did it make? He could still fly and fight.

    (18) Although honored by his enemies, he was ultimately killed by his own countrymen.

    Answer: Rudolf Berthold

    Rudolf Berthold
    Rudolf Berthold (March 24, 1891 – March 15, 1920) was a German World War I flying ace. Between 1916 and 1918 he shot down 44 enemy planes—most of them over the Belgian front. Berthold had the reputation as a ruthless, fearless and—above all—a very patriotic fighter. His perseverance and bravery made him one of the most famous German pilots of the First World War.

    Rudolf Berthold was a forester's son. He started his career as a soldier with the 3rd Brandenberg Infantry regiment in 1910. He learned to fly at his own expense in 1913, qualifying as a pilot in September 1913. Thus he transferred to the German Air Service when war broke out in August 1914, and over the next two years flew as an Observer on Halberstadt and DFW two seaters with FFA 23, winning the Iron Cross 1st and 2nd class.

    In September 1915 he was stationed with Hans-Joachim Buddecke in FFA 223, and the two became friends. They decided that Buddecke should use his experience in a monoplane in 223's new Fokker Eindecker, while Berthold would fly the AEG G.II with its three gunners. This decision sped Buddecke on his way to being a member of the first wave of German aces that included Oswald Boelcke, Max Immelmann, and Kurt Wintgens. It left Berthold flying his plane into an indecisive but costly battle on 2 October 1915 when his British pusher opponent mortally wounded two of his gunners and escaped. Only when Buddecke transferred to Turkey did Berthold fall heir to a Fokker Eindecker.

    Later in 1916 with Kek Vaux, Berthold was injured in the first of several crashes in his wartime career. On 26 April 1916, by which time he already had 5 victories, he crashed a Pfalz E.IV and was sidelined by a broken pelvis, thigh, and nose for the next four months. On 24 August 1916, Berthold scored his sixth victory and received the Royal House Order of Hohenzollern. The next day, KEK Vaux became Jasta 4 under Berthold's command. The new unit started with a starred rosterHans-Joachim Buddecke, Wilhelm Frankl, Walter Höhndorf, and Ernst Freiherr von Althaus were early members and all future aces. Berthold handed over command to Buddecke and served in the Jasta's ranks before joining Jasta 14 on 16 October 1916. Buddecke and a wingman circled overhead as Berthold's train bore him away to his new assignment.

    On 24 March 1917 that he shot down a French Farman from Escadrille F7. He served with Jasta 14 until May 1917 when he was wounded in combat with a RFC scout, suffering a fractured skull, broken nose, pelvis and thigh. In August he was given command of Jasta 18. He shot down a Spad on 21 August, raising his tally to 13. On 28 September 1917 he shot down the DH-5 of 6-kill 'ace' Capt. Alwayne Loyd, of No 32 Squadron RFC, who was killed. During September he scored 14 victories, bringing his tally to 27. On 2 October he scored his 28th victory ; a DH.4 bomber of No. 57 Squadron RFC,

    During a dogfight on 10 October a bullet crippled his right upper arm. This was the same day he was awarded the Pour le Merite. He was promoted to Hauptmann on 26 October 1917, just 8 days after receiving the Pour le Merite. According to Paul Strähle, who was one of his pilots at the time, Berthold's stern behavior subsequently became erratic under the influence of morphine; in one incident he not only raged at his pilots for disorderly quarters, but lashed about with a riding crop.

    In March 1918 he returned to active service and took command of Jagdgeschwader 2, receiving permission to transfer his Jasta 18 personnel en masse into Jasta 15. Despite being in constant pain from his unhealed injuries, Berthold continued flying. He refused any surgical help because he believed an operation would make it impossible for him to continue flying. Berthold didn't even have the bullet removed from his arm. Throughout the summer of 1918 Berthold continued flying, increasingly relying on morphine for pain relief. Such was his strength of will he also taught himself to write with his left hand.

    With JG 2 Berthold often flew a Pfalz D.III in preference to the Albatros D.V, until May 1918 when the new Fokker D.VII entered service.

    Berthold had a personal insignia of a winged sword on the side of the blue fuselages and red noses sported by all aircraft of Jasta 15.

    His final wartime mishap came on 10 August 1918 when he shot down two RAF DH-4 bombers, but collided with the second of these victories and crashed into a house. He was hospitalised until after the war (ironically, this was the same date that Lt. Erich Lowenhardt was killed).

    After the war Berthold became a fanatic patriot and nationalist, becoming a member of the anti-communist Freikorps. He founded the 1200-strong "Fränkische Bauern-Detachment Eiserne Schar Berthold" in April 1919, and took part in several demonstrations and fought against communist factions.

    Berthold was shot on 15 March 1920 in Harburg during a riot between German communist and nationalist factions, after taking part in the failed Kapp Putsch. During the coup d'Ă©tat Berthold's unit was reportedly cornered in a Harburg school. Reports about the cause of his death then varied, with some accounts stating he was beaten, stabbed and shot dead, while other sources say he was strangled with the ribbon of the 'Blue Max' medal he still wore.

    On his first gravestone {since destroyed} was allegedly the memorial: "Honored by his Enemies, killed by his German brethren".


  6. #7706

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Another note on Rudolf Berthold: Although he is perhaps not well known, I bought a metal model of his Fokker D VII for my grandson a couple of years ago. The color scheme of his plane, blue with a red nose and his winged sword; is perhaps today more easily recognized than his name. Thanks; Ernie P.

  7. #7707

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Try this: Google "iron man ace" and see what comes up as the first link...

    OK, new person.

    1. Male.

    2. Canadian.

    3. Provided instruction to Howard Hughes (yes, THAT Howard Hughes) on how to fly a certain aircraft. He didn't like either Howard Hughes' attitude or his personal hygiene.

  8. #7708

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    New clue:

    1. Male.

    2. Canadian.

    3. Provided instruction to Howard Hughes (yes, THAT Howard Hughes) on how to fly a certain aircraft. He didn't like either Howard Hughes' attitude or his personal hygiene.

    4. The aircraft on which he instructed HH (see clue #3, above) was a four engined turboprop airliner.

  9. #7709

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    New clue:

    1. Male.

    2. Canadian.

    3. Provided instruction to Howard Hughes (yes, THAT Howard Hughes) on how to fly a certain aircraft. He didn't like either Howard Hughes' attitude or his personal hygiene.

    4. The aircraft on which he instructed HH (see clue #3, above) was a four engined turboprop airliner.

    5. It was the Vickers Viscount.

    6. This person also held the transatlantic speed record three times.

    OK, this is PLENTY of information to figure out who I'm thinking of: Let's have some guesses!

  10. #7710

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: JohnnyS

    New clue:

    1. Male.

    2. Canadian.

    3. Provided instruction to Howard Hughes (yes, THAT Howard Hughes) on how to fly a certain aircraft. He didn't like either Howard Hughes' attitude or his personal hygiene.

    4. The aircraft on which he instructed HH (see clue #3, above) was a four engined turboprop airliner.

    5. It was the Vickers Viscount.

    6. This person also held the transatlantic speed record three times.

    OK, this is PLENTY of information to figure out who I'm thinking of: Let's have some guesses!

    I'm assuming you are talking about Donald Howard Rogers, long-time test pilot for AVRO Canada. I think most people are simply missing a connection to warbirds and warbird pilots. Thanks; Ernie P.


    DON ROGERS, AVIATOR 1916-2006
    The chief test pilot for A.V. Roe was the last of his breed, a brotherhood of fliers who helped set Canada on the leading edge of aviation technology. For all that, he was no swashbuckler and proud of it
    PETER CHENEY
    With files from Canadian Press
    TORONTO As a test pilot, Don Rogers had known plenty of colleagues who died on the job. One was flying a new aircraft that came apart within sight of the airport. Another was trapped inside a fighter that went down in flames. But Mr. Rogers himself was fated to survive and was killed by cancer, not by an airplane.
    Mr. Rogers was the last remaining member of a brotherhood that defined a Canadian Golden Age. As chief test pilot for the A.V. Roe company, Mr. Rogers lived with risk, and helped create iconic aircraft that once set Canada on aviation's leading edge.
    The contributions of test pilots to aviation and Canadian heritage should not be taken lightly, says Andrew Hibbert, president of Arrow Recovery Canada.
    "All we ever talk about now is astronauts and people like that, but these were the astronauts of their day," Mr. Hibbert said. "They were the most advanced and well-trained pilots in the world at that time."


    In his own way, Mr. Rogers also personified a particular brand of Canadian gentility he was a "gentleman's gentleman."
    "He was very old-school," said his son Raymond, 65. "He was quiet, he was unassuming, he was extremely modest about what he's done and accomplished."
    Mr. Rogers was no swashbuckler, and had no time for those who regarded test-pilots as heroes. He said his success wasn't based on skill or nerve. Instead, he chalked it up to being "in the right place at the right time."
    He was defined by flight. He grew up in Hamilton, Ont., during a time when pilots enjoyed celebrity status, and new aircraft designs captivated the public. He learned to fly at the Hamilton Aero Club and got his pilot's in 1936. It was also where he found love of a different kind. In 1940 he married June, the sweetheart he had met there.
    As war loomed in the late 1930s, he took an instructor's course with the Royal Canadian Air Force and later became assistant chief flying instructor at an RCAF school in Mount Hope, Ont. In 1942, he transferred to the National Steel Car plant and tested military aircraft that would be shipped to Europe for the war effort. His logbook soon read like an airplane buff's wish list he flew Lysanders, Avro Ansons, Lancaster bombers, and B-25 Mitchell bombers. Mr. Rogers also flew two transatlantic ferry flights, now routine, but then a genuine adventure when radial piston engines leaked so much oil they had to be topped up after every flight.
    His reputation as a cool and gifted pilot landed him a job at A.V. Roe, a Toronto company that would describe a tragic arc it became shining symbol of Canadian enterprise, only to crash and burn thanks to a combination of political machination and corporate myopia. Mr. Rogers's arrived at the company in 1945, just as it prepared to enter a period of unparalleled inventiveness and energy.
    Mr. Rogers' position was chief test pilot. Although the title conjured up images of Errol Flynn in a white scarf, Mr. Rogers was modest about his role: "Daredevil stunts of our Hollywood and Sunday supplement counterparts have distorted the picture most people have of my profession," he once said. "Although I have always found test flying to be interesting and stimulating, I have yet to jump out of a burning plane into the arms of a beautiful woman worse luck."
    The A.V. Roe plant was a vast manufacturing plant with a huge engineering department that was drawing up plans for such amazing projects as the C-102 Jetliner, a jet-powered airliner designed to hit speeds of to 800 km/h almost three times faster than the propeller-driven airliners of the time. The Jetliner flew for the first time in 1949, with hundreds of cheering A.V. Roe lining the runway. Mr. Rogers took over the testing on the Jetliner's 16th flight, and soon discovered the first major gremlin when the landing gear refused to extend. (An engineer flying with Mr. Rogers broke a rib trying to get the wheels down with an emergency handle.) The airport manager urged him to ditch the Jetliner in Lake Ontario, but Mr. Rogers was bent on saving the airplane, and made a belly landing on the runway.
    The problem was quickly traced to an easily fixed design flaw. Mr. Rogers minimized the drama of the wheels-up landing: ". . . there was no problem at all as far as we were concerned," he said.
    Over the next two years, Mr. Rogers broke speed records in the Jetliner and made the first international air-mail flight in a jet transport when he flew mail from Toronto to New York. Included in the cargo was a peace pipe that the mayor of Toronto told Mr. Rogers and flight engineer Bill Baker to deliver to the mayor of New York. "I didn't know which one of us was supposed to puff on the thing to keep it going," Mr. Rogers said. "I think Bill lighted it just before we landed."
    In 1951, Mr. Rogers demonstrated the Jetliner to the American military and several U.S. airlines interest in the jetliner was soaring. Then politics got in the way and Ottawa ordered Avro to stop working on the Jetliner and concentrate on getting the new CF-100 jet fighter and the Orenda jet engine into production so they could be used in the Korean war.
    A.V. Roe executives put the project on the backburner, against the objections of Mr. Rogers, who believed the company was poised to dominate a new market. There was only one other jet airliner in the world (the DeHavilland Comet, which flew 13 days before the C-102, but was cursed by a design flaw that caused a series of crashes). The Jetliner was ready almost a decade before the Boeing 707, which would define the age of jet travel.
    But instead of continuing with the Jetliner, Avro shifted its focus to keep Ottawa happy and missed the jet market, in a move that might be compared to Bill Gates deciding to get out of the software business in the mid-1970s. "I personally feel that the company made a very bad decision at that point," Mr. Rogers said later.
    Even so, the Jetliner exerted a powerful mystique. In 1952, Mr. Rogers was asked to fly the airplane to California at the request of Howard Hughes, who wanted to use it to develop new equipment. Mr. Rogers soon found himself drawn into the world of the brilliant and eccentric tycoon.

    Although he was supposed to stay only 10 days, Mr. Rogers was soon placed on retainer by Mr. Hughes, who wanted him available at all times. Mr. Hughes flew in Mr. Rogers's wife and children, then rented them a luxurious former ambassador's residence in nearby Coldwater Canyon that had a swimming pool and fruit trees.
    Mr. Hughes had the Jetliner moved to a guarded compound, along with several other treasured aircraft. Mr. Rogers would wait for weeks at a time, then find himself summoned for a flying session with Mr. Hughes.
    Although he was an excellent pilot, the tycoon had a distinctive quirk "complete and utter disregard" for air traffic control in one of the most congested airspaces in the world. When Mr. Rogers asked him about his flight plan and other the proximity of other aircraft as they climbed up through the fog and smog of Los Angeles, Mr. Hughes replied: "Don't worry about that."
    When Hollywood released the Hughes biopic The Aviator in 2005, Mr. Rogers was asked whether the movie corresponded with reality. Mr. Rogers said that the billionaire's eccentricities had been heightened in the film. "I had met and flown with a most outstanding man who was an expert pilot," he said, "and had seen something of a way of life much different than that to which I was accustomed."
    From the mid-fifties onward, Mr. Rogers lived through a devastating decline at A.V. Roe. In 1956, the company decreed that the Jetliner be scrapped. Mr. Rogers stayed away from the hangar while the work went on: "I can't imagine anything more unpleasant than seeing an airplane that you have lived with for seven years and enjoyed flying a really beautiful machine being cut up with saws, axes and hammers, with pieces falling on the hangar floor," he said. ". . . it was a heart-rending experience."
    Just three years later, the Diefenbaker government ordered the cancellation of the Arrow, a supersonic fighter that many saw as the apogee of Canadian technical achievement. Like the Jetliner, the Arrows were cut up for scrap.
    The CF-100 jet fighter, one of its staple products, was discontinued the same year, and the company's aerial mojo was gone. Mr. Rogers became head of the company's new marine division, supervising the construction of aluminum boat hulls. Although he made the best of it, pointing out that the cockpit of a boat was far less cramped than that of the CF-100 jet he once test flew, Mr. Rogers still longed to fly, and rented private aircraft at a local flying club.
    In 1962, A.V. Avro's British parent company was purchased by Hawker-Siddely, which closed the Toronto plant. The facility was later operated by other aircraft companies, including Boeing, but was demolished in 2005.
    "I'm horrified to see the place going down," Mr. Rogers said. "It did a good job."
    Donald Rogers was born
    on Nov. 26, 1916, in Hamilton, Ont. He died of cancer on July 19, 2006, in Toronto. He was 89. He is survived by June, his wife of 66 years, and by his son Raymond and his daughter Connie. He was predeceased by his son Stephen.









  11. #7711

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    A rare swing-and-a-miss from Ernie P!

    Close, but not quite.

    One more clue:

    1. Male.

    2. Canadian.

    3. Provided instruction to Howard Hughes (yes, THAT Howard Hughes) on how to fly a certain aircraft. He didn't like either Howard Hughes' attitude or his personal hygiene.

    4. The aircraft on which he instructed HH (see clue #3, above) was a four engined turboprop airliner.

    5. It was the Vickers Viscount.

    6. This person also held the transatlantic speed record three times

    7. He was one of the first pilots of Trans-Canada Air Lines in 1937, which later became Air Canada.

  12. #7712

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Donald MacLaren
    \"any crash you can walk away from is a good crash\" Launch pad Mcquack

  13. #7713

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Close again, but no cigar.

    One more clue:

    1. Male.

    2. Canadian.

    3. Provided instruction to Howard Hughes (yes, THAT Howard Hughes) on how to fly a certain aircraft. He didn't like either Howard Hughes' attitude or his personal hygiene.

    4. The aircraft on which he instructed HH (see clue #3, above) was a four engined turboprop airliner.

    5. It was the Vickers Viscount.

    6. This person also held the transatlantic speed record three times

    7. He was one of the first pilots of Trans-Canada Air Lines in 1937, which later became Air Canada.

    8. Born in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

  14. #7714

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Gordon Roy McGregor.
    \"any crash you can walk away from is a good crash\" Launch pad Mcquack

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Gordon Roy McGregor wasn't born in Vancouver. But you're getting close.

  16. #7716

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: JohnnyS

    Gordon Roy McGregor wasn't born in Vancouver. But you're getting close.

    JohnnyS;

    I still can’t figure out a connection with warbirds or warbird pilots, but you have to be talking about George Lothian. What’s the connection? I’m really curious about this one. Thanks; Ernie P.


    George Bayliss Lothian
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    George Bayliss Lothian was born November 20, 1909 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. He was one of the first pilots of Trans-Canada Air Lines in 1937, which later became Air Canada. He died February 13, 2000.

    Aviation career

    George Lothian was the first Canadian pilot to log 100 aircraft crossings of the North Atlantic and set the trans-Atlantic crossing speed record three times. When he retired from Air Canada in 1968 he had logged over 21,000 as pilot in command of many different piston and jet transport aircraft. He reluctantly gave flight instruction in the Vickers Viscount turboprop airliner to Howard Hughes and did not appreciate either his personal hygiene or his attitude.


  17. #7717

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Bingo. George Bayliss Lothian is the person I was looking for. He was a ferry pilot in WWII, so he ferried warbirds across the Atlantic.

    From: http://www.cahf.ca/members/L_members...liss%20Lothian

    George Bayliss Lothian

    Birthdate: November 20, 1909
    Birth Place: Vancouver, British Columbia
    Year Inducted: 1973
    Death Date: February 13, 2000

    "His inspired leadership in ocean flying despite adversity, the sharing of his exceptional aviation skills with others willing to learn, his unswerving demand for perfection in all who served under his command, bred a most superior grade of airman and resulted in outstanding benefit to Canadian aviation."

    George Lothian was one of the first pilots for Trans-Canada Air Lines, established in 1937. Seconded to the Trans-Atlantic Ferry Service, he became the first Canadian pilot to complete 100 air crossings of the North Atlantic. Achievements with Air Canada included winning the trans-Atlantic speed record 3 times, training pilots, and participating in rapid decompression experiments. After retiring in 1968, he had achieved more than 21,000 hours as pilot-in-command of numerous aircraft types and more than 1,000 air crossings of the North Atlantic Ocean.


    On a side note, I had the privilege of meeting him in the early 1980s when my dad introduced me. My dad told me that he didn't know anyone who could make a big four-engined bomber "behave" properly like George Lothian could.

    You're up!!

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: JohnnyS

    Bingo. George Bayliss Lothian is the person I was looking for. He was a ferry pilot in WWII, so he ferried warbirds across the Atlantic.

    From: http://www.cahf.ca/members/L_members...liss%20Lothian

    George Bayliss Lothian

    Birthdate: November 20, 1909
    Birth Place: Vancouver, British Columbia
    Year Inducted: 1973
    Death Date: February 13, 2000

    ''His inspired leadership in ocean flying despite adversity, the sharing of his exceptional aviation skills with others willing to learn, his unswerving demand for perfection in all who served under his command, bred a most superior grade of airman and resulted in outstanding benefit to Canadian aviation.''

    George Lothian was one of the first pilots for Trans-Canada Air Lines, established in 1937. Seconded to the Trans-Atlantic Ferry Service, he became the first Canadian pilot to complete 100 air crossings of the North Atlantic. Achievements with Air Canada included winning the trans-Atlantic speed record 3 times, training pilots, and participating in rapid decompression experiments. After retiring in 1968, he had achieved more than 21,000 hours as pilot-in-command of numerous aircraft types and more than 1,000 air crossings of the North Atlantic Ocean.


    On a side note, I had the privilege of meeting him in the early 1980s when my dad introduced me. My dad told me that he didn't know anyone who could make a big four-engined bomber ''behave'' properly like George Lothian could.

    You're up!!

    Thanks for the background and the question. Okay; let's stay with aviators for a while. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What ace do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) His name is on all the lists, prominently so.

    (2) After being rejected for pilot training, he learned to fly at his own expense.

  19. #7719

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: JohnnyS

    Bingo. George Bayliss Lothian is the person I was looking for. He was a ferry pilot in WWII, so he ferried warbirds across the Atlantic.

    From: http://www.cahf.ca/members/L_members...liss%20Lothian

    George Bayliss Lothian

    Birthdate: November 20, 1909
    Birth Place: Vancouver, British Columbia
    Year Inducted: 1973
    Death Date: February 13, 2000

    ''His inspired leadership in ocean flying despite adversity, the sharing of his exceptional aviation skills with others willing to learn, his unswerving demand for perfection in all who served under his command, bred a most superior grade of airman and resulted in outstanding benefit to Canadian aviation.''

    George Lothian was one of the first pilots for Trans-Canada Air Lines, established in 1937. Seconded to the Trans-Atlantic Ferry Service, he became the first Canadian pilot to complete 100 air crossings of the North Atlantic. Achievements with Air Canada included winning the trans-Atlantic speed record 3 times, training pilots, and participating in rapid decompression experiments. After retiring in 1968, he had achieved more than 21,000 hours as pilot-in-command of numerous aircraft types and more than 1,000 air crossings of the North Atlantic Ocean.


    On a side note, I had the privilege of meeting him in the early 1980s when my dad introduced me. My dad told me that he didn't know anyone who could make a big four-engined bomber ''behave'' properly like George Lothian could.

    You're up!!

    By the way; isn't it really neat to be able to talk to the warriors of that day? Too few of them are left, though. They were something. Thanks; Ernie P.

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    An evening clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What ace do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) His name is on all the lists, prominently so.

    (2) After being rejected for pilot training, he learned to fly at his own expense.

    (3) Considered, at best, to be a very ordinary pilot, he suffered a number of mishaps from his poor flying.

  21. #7721

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    And a morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What ace do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) His name is on all the lists, prominently so.

    (2) After being rejected for pilot training, he learned to fly at his own expense.

    (3) Considered, at best, to be a very ordinary pilot, he suffered a number of mishaps from his poor flying.

    (4) After a year’s service, during which he achieved notable success, he was given an extended leave.

  22. #7722

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    I'm going to be out of touch for 24 hours or so. I'll give you a couple of extra clues upon which to cogitate until I return. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What ace do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) His name is on all the lists, prominently so.

    (2) After being rejected for pilot training, he learned to fly at his own expense.

    (3) Considered, at best, to be a very ordinary pilot, he suffered a number of mishaps from his poor flying.

    (4) After a year’s service, during which he achieved notable success, he was given an extended leave.

    (5) He voluntarily returned to action and was killed less than three months later.

    (6) A noted and successful athlete.

  23. #7723

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Back with an afternoon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What ace do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) His name is on all the lists, prominently so.

    (2) After being rejected for pilot training, he learned to fly at his own expense.

    (3) Considered, at best, to be a very ordinary pilot, he suffered a number of mishaps from his poor flying.

    (4) After a year’s service, during which he achieved notable success, he was given an extended leave.

    (5) He voluntarily returned to action and was killed less than three months later.

    (6) A noted and successful athlete.

    (7) It is still debated as to whether he was hit from a bullet fired by an enemy aviator or one fired from the ground.

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Hmmm.... I know this one isn't that hard. JohnnyS already has it, but he can't play this week. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What ace do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) His name is on all the lists, prominently so.

    (2) After being rejected for pilot training, he learned to fly at his own expense.

    (3) Considered, at best, to be a very ordinary pilot, he suffered a number of mishaps from his poor flying.

    (4) After a year’s service, during which he achieved notable success, he was given an extended leave.

    (5) He voluntarily returned to action and was killed less than three months later.

    (6) A noted and successful athlete.

    (7) It is still debated as to whether he was hit from a bullet fired by an enemy aviator or one fired from the ground.

    (8) In the beginning of his flying career, he suffered from airsickness.

  25. #7725
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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Manfred Freiherr Von Richtofen ??
    Fleet Brotherhood #5
    Half A Wing, Three Engines and A Prayer


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