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  1. #7751

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Sorry for the delay.

    Im going to continue with the pilots

    This ace died a royal death.

    He had a lot in common with a contemporary leading U.S. ace

    He lived till shortly after the first ww

    He was originally assigned to a cavalry unit then transferred to aviation
    \"any crash you can walk away from is a good crash\" Launch pad Mcquack

  2. #7752

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


  3. #7753
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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Lothar von Richtofen?
    www.goldenageair.org
    Make sure you visit my good friend Mike O'Neal at
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    P-40 Brotherhood #44 TF Gold Edition Kit built in 2001, TF Red Box Kit still waiting on finish
    Sig Brotherhood #63 Sig Kougar, King Kobra, Komander, and 1/4 Scale Clip wing J-3
    P-47 Brotherhood TopFlite Red Box P-47 Spring Air retracts ASP .61

  4. #7754

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    ORIGINAL: psb667

    Sorry for the delay.

    Im going to continue with the pilots

    This ace died a royal death.

    He had a lot in common with a contemporary leading U.S. ace

    He lived till shortly after the first ww

    He was originally assigned to a cavalry unit then transferred to aviation
    Those are both close

    This Ace was the son of a diplomat

    This aces plane was used by a famous U.S. ace as well as several aces from his own country

    This ace died in a airshow performing difficult maneuvers for royalty
    \"any crash you can walk away from is a good crash\" Launch pad Mcquack

  5. #7755

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    psb667;

    Sorry; I missed your edit, or it wasn't shown. My mistake. Thanks; Ernie P.

  6. #7756

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: psb667

    ORIGINAL: psb667

    Sorry for the delay.

    Im going to continue with the pilots

    This ace died a royal death.

    He had a lot in common with a contemporary leading U.S. ace

    He lived till shortly after the first ww

    He was originally assigned to a cavalry unit then transferred to aviation
    Those are both close

    This Ace was the son of a diplomat

    This aces plane was used by a famous U.S. ace as well as several aces from his own country
    No worries ernie

    Planes from this aces squadron are decorated to inspire fear in the enemy pilots
    \"any crash you can walk away from is a good crash\" Launch pad Mcquack

  7. #7757

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: psb667


    ORIGINAL: psb667

    ORIGINAL: psb667

    Sorry for the delay.

    Im going to continue with the pilots

    This ace died a royal death.

    He had a lot in common with a contemporary leading U.S. ace

    He lived till shortly after the first ww

    He was originally assigned to a cavalry unit then transferred to aviation
    Those are both close

    This Ace was the son of a diplomat

    This aces plane was used by a famous U.S. ace as well as several aces from his own country
    No worries ernie

    Planes from this aces squadron are decorated to inspire fear in the enemy pilots
    Not a lot to work with; ace, son of a diplomat, died shortly after WWI. But if we don't try to narrow it down, we won't get anywhere. How about Kazakov? Certainly, his death was memorable. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Alexander Alexandrovich Kazakov (Kozakov, Kosakoff) (Russian: Александр Александрович Казаков) (15 January 1889 – 1 August 1919) (British Distinguished Service Order and Military Cross and the French Légion d'honneur) was the most successful Russian flying ace and fighter pilot during the First World War.

    Born to a Russian noble family in Kherson Governorate, Kazakov graduated from Yelizavetgrad cavalry school in 1908. He did his stint in cavalry, but in 1913 he began formal training as a pilot and graduated at the beginning of World War I from Gatchina military aviation school.

    Alexander Kazakov flew on Morane-Saulnier, Spad – SА2, Nieuport 11 and Nieuport 17 planes and is alleged to have the largest number of victories over enemy aircraft among Imperial Russian Air Force pilots. Unofficially he shot down 32 German and Austro-Hungarian planes, although his official tally is only 20 because only planes crashed in Russian-held territory were counted. Russian military aviation tradition during World War I was different from that of its Western allies and rivals and the individual scores of pilots were considered to be of lesser value compared to their contribution to the overall war effort.

    On 31 March 1915 Alexander Kazakov successfully repeated the aerial ramming attack first attempted by Pyotr Nesterov, using a Morane-Saulnier G as his piloted projectile. For this bit of daring, he was awarded the Order of Saint Anne, first in the Fourth Class, then in the Third. He was appointed to command of 19th Corps Fighter Detachment in September 1915. Here he had Nieuport 10s and Nieuport 11s to fly. Between 27 June and 21 December 1916, he racked up four more victories to become an ace.

    Five months later, Kazakov resumed his winning streak with his sixth victory on 6 May 1917, which was shared with Ernst Leman and Pavel Argeyev. By 25 May, with his eighth win, he switched to a Nieuport 17, which he used henceforth. Between 1915 and 1917 he fought on the Russian front as well as in Romania and participated in the Brusilov Offensive as a commander of 1st Combat Air Group.

    In January 1918, in the wake of the Russian Revolution, Kazakov resigned his Russian commission.

    During the Russian Civil War Kazakov joined the Slavo-British Allied Legion in Arkhangelsk and fought against the Bolshevik Red Army airforce.

    On 1 August 1918 Kazakov became a major in the Royal Air Force and was appointed to be commanding officer in charge of an aviation squadron of the Slavo-British Allied Legion made up of Sopwith Camel planes. After the British withdrawal from Russia which left the Russian White Army in a desperate situation, Kazakov died in a plane crash during an air show on 1 August 1919 which was performed to boost the morale of the Russian anti-Bolshevik troops. Most witnesses of the incident, including British ace Ira Jones, thought Kazakov committed suicide.


  8. #7758

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: Ernie P.


    ORIGINAL: psb667


    ORIGINAL: psb667

    ORIGINAL: psb667

    Sorry for the delay.

    Im going to continue with the pilots

    This ace died a royal death.

    He had a lot in common with a contemporary leading U.S. ace

    He lived till shortly after the first ww

    He was originally assigned to a cavalry unit then transferred to aviation
    Those are both close

    This Ace was the son of a diplomat

    This aces plane was used by a famous U.S. ace as well as several aces from his own country
    No worries ernie

    Planes from this aces squadron are decorated to inspire fear in the enemy pilots
    Not a lot to work with; ace, son of a diplomat, died shortly after WWI. But if we don't try to narrow it down, we won't get anywhere. How about Kazakov? Certainly, his death was memorable. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Alexander Alexandrovich Kazakov (Kozakov, Kosakoff) (Russian: Александр Александрович Казаков) (15 January 1889 – 1 August 1919) (British Distinguished Service Order and Military Cross and the French Légion d'honneur) was the most successful Russian flying ace and fighter pilot during the First World War.

    Born to a Russian noble family in Kherson Governorate, Kazakov graduated from Yelizavetgrad cavalry school in 1908. He did his stint in cavalry, but in 1913 he began formal training as a pilot and graduated at the beginning of World War I from Gatchina military aviation school.

    Alexander Kazakov flew on Morane-Saulnier, Spad – SА2, Nieuport 11 and Nieuport 17 planes and is alleged to have the largest number of victories over enemy aircraft among Imperial Russian Air Force pilots. Unofficially he shot down 32 German and Austro-Hungarian planes, although his official tally is only 20 because only planes crashed in Russian-held territory were counted. Russian military aviation tradition during World War I was different from that of its Western allies and rivals and the individual scores of pilots were considered to be of lesser value compared to their contribution to the overall war effort.

    On 31 March 1915 Alexander Kazakov successfully repeated the aerial ramming attack first attempted by Pyotr Nesterov, using a Morane-Saulnier G as his piloted projectile. For this bit of daring, he was awarded the Order of Saint Anne, first in the Fourth Class, then in the Third. He was appointed to command of 19th Corps Fighter Detachment in September 1915. Here he had Nieuport 10s and Nieuport 11s to fly. Between 27 June and 21 December 1916, he racked up four more victories to become an ace.

    Five months later, Kazakov resumed his winning streak with his sixth victory on 6 May 1917, which was shared with Ernst Leman and Pavel Argeyev. By 25 May, with his eighth win, he switched to a Nieuport 17, which he used henceforth. Between 1915 and 1917 he fought on the Russian front as well as in Romania and participated in the Brusilov Offensive as a commander of 1st Combat Air Group.

    In January 1918, in the wake of the Russian Revolution, Kazakov resigned his Russian commission.

    During the Russian Civil War Kazakov joined the Slavo-British Allied Legion in Arkhangelsk and fought against the Bolshevik Red Army airforce.

    On 1 August 1918 Kazakov became a major in the Royal Air Force and was appointed to be commanding officer in charge of an aviation squadron of the Slavo-British Allied Legion made up of Sopwith Camel planes. After the British withdrawal from Russia which left the Russian White Army in a desperate situation, Kazakov died in a plane crash during an air show on 1 August 1919 which was performed to boost the morale of the Russian anti-Bolshevik troops. Most witnesses of the incident, including British ace Ira Jones, thought Kazakov committed suicide.

    Good guess not the right one but so close right down to the last detail.
    \"any crash you can walk away from is a good crash\" Launch pad Mcquack

  9. #7759

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    My next post wouldnt go through so ill try again.

    This ace died performing at a airshow after the war.

    He was performing difficult maneuvers to impress royalty.

    His best friend, fellow pilot and squadron member witnessed the crash. He cried

    His squad used spad xiiis
    \"any crash you can walk away from is a good crash\" Launch pad Mcquack

  10. #7760

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: psb667

    My next post wouldnt go through so ill try again.

    This ace died performing at a airshow after the war.

    He was performing difficult maneuvers to impress royalty.

    His best friend, fellow pilot and squadron member witnessed the crash. He cried

    His squad used spad xiiis
    This ace is one of two aces from his country of origin
    \"any crash you can walk away from is a good crash\" Launch pad Mcquack

  11. #7761

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: psb667


    ORIGINAL: psb667

    My next post wouldnt go through so ill try again.

    This ace died performing at a airshow after the war.

    He was performing difficult maneuvers to impress royalty.

    His best friend, fellow pilot and squadron member witnessed the crash. He cried

    His squad used spad xiiis
    This ace is one of two aces from his country of origin
    A good question, psb667. However, it won't go much past the time I wake up in the morning. Dying at an airshow may seem a silly way for an ace to die; but I guess the reaper waits us all and takes us in his turn. Thanks; Ernie P.

  12. #7762
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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Petar Marinovich?


    Pierre Marinovich was born 1 August 1898 in Paris, France of Serbian extraction. He volunteered for the duration of the war on 12 February 1916 and was immediately assigned to the 27th Regiment de Dragoons. On 14 July he transferred to aviation as a student pilot, and received a Military Pilots Brevet N.4910 on 15 November 1916. After further training he was sent his GDE and on 19 March 1917 he was assigned to Escadrille N.38. Unfortunately, before he was able to see action he fell seriously ill and was sent with little hope of recovery to the hospital for several months. He proved the experts and doctors wrong and recovered well enough to return to duty.



    He was reassigned to Escadrille N.94, which was being formed near Châlons-en-Champagne. They were known as "The Grim Reaperers" and adopted "The Grim Reaper" as their logo, painted it prominently on the side of each of the planes in the squadron. He was promoted almost immediately to Marechal-des-logis on 26 July 1917, and in recognition of his 3rd victory he received the Medaille Militaire on 10 January 1918 (Order N.6239). Then on 20 February 1917 he was promoted to Adjutant. On 26 July 1918, he was made Chevalier de la Legion d'Honneur citing his 13th victory. Followed very quickly by a temporary promotion to Sous Lieutenant that came on 20 Oct 1918. When the war ended Marinovich had earned 22 verified victories over enemy aircraft and was awarded France’s Croix de Guerre with ten palms.



    Marinovich was Austen Crehore's flying partner and best friend, who he often credited with saving his life early in his career with Escadrille No.94. As Marinovich told the story a German plane was hot on his tail tearing it to shreds with machine gun fire. Crehore barrel rolled in behind the German and took him out in one long machine gun burst. Marinovich often said publicly that he felt that he shared his victories with his friend that had saved him at the beginning of his career. Pierre Marinovich and Austen Crehore were the best of friends and Austen was present when he tragically witnessed his death.



    In 1919, after the war, Pierre Marinovich died in a senseless plane crash performing complicated aviation stunts to entertain the King and Queen of Belgium at Evere Airfield, Brussels, Belgium.

    Can't let Ernie have ALL the fun.....
    Thanks,
    Zip


  13. #7763

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Zippomes got it. Thanks to a little extra hint.
    \"any crash you can walk away from is a good crash\" Launch pad Mcquack

  14. #7764

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: zippome

    Petar Marinovich?


    Pierre Marinovich was born 1 August 1898 in Paris, France of Serbian extraction. He volunteered for the duration of the war on 12 February 1916 and was immediately assigned to the 27th Regiment de Dragoons. On 14 July he transferred to aviation as a student pilot, and received a Military Pilots Brevet N.4910 on 15 November 1916. After further training he was sent his GDE and on 19 March 1917 he was assigned to Escadrille N.38. Unfortunately, before he was able to see action he fell seriously ill and was sent with little hope of recovery to the hospital for several months. He proved the experts and doctors wrong and recovered well enough to return to duty.



    He was reassigned to Escadrille N.94, which was being formed near Châlons-en-Champagne. They were known as ''The Grim Reaperers'' and adopted ''The Grim Reaper'' as their logo, painted it prominently on the side of each of the planes in the squadron. He was promoted almost immediately to Marechal-des-logis on 26 July 1917, and in recognition of his 3rd victory he received the Medaille Militaire on 10 January 1918 (Order N.6239). Then on 20 February 1917 he was promoted to Adjutant. On 26 July 1918, he was made Chevalier de la Legion d'Honneur citing his 13th victory. Followed very quickly by a temporary promotion to Sous Lieutenant that came on 20 Oct 1918. When the war ended Marinovich had earned 22 verified victories over enemy aircraft and was awarded France’s Croix de Guerre with ten palms.



    Marinovich was Austen Crehore's flying partner and best friend, who he often credited with saving his life early in his career with Escadrille No.94. As Marinovich told the story a German plane was hot on his tail tearing it to shreds with machine gun fire. Crehore barrel rolled in behind the German and took him out in one long machine gun burst. Marinovich often said publicly that he felt that he shared his victories with his friend that had saved him at the beginning of his career. Pierre Marinovich and Austen Crehore were the best of friends and Austen was present when he tragically witnessed his death.



    In 1919, after the war, Pierre Marinovich died in a senseless plane crash performing complicated aviation stunts to entertain the King and Queen of Belgium at Evere Airfield, Brussels, Belgium.

    Can't let Ernie have ALL the fun.....
    Thanks,
    Zip
    Â*

    Good job, Zip. Thanks; Ernie P.

  15. #7765

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: psb667

    Zippomes got it. Thanks to a little extra hint.
    A good question, psb667. Something I noticed a while back: Richthofen, The Red Baron, is considered to be a Polish pilot in some lists. Thanks; Ernie P.

  16. #7766
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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Ok guys, here goes another one...

    1. Twin Engined
    2. Monoplane
    3. Designed and built for a contingency that didn't happen.


    Thanks,
    Zip

  17. #7767

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    st-1
    \"any crash you can walk away from is a good crash\" Launch pad Mcquack

  18. #7768
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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    English Electric Lightning

  19. #7769
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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Interesting guesses, but not what I'm going for here...

    Ok guys, here goes another one...

    1. Twin Engined
    2. Monoplane
    3. Designed and built for a contingency that didn't happen.
    4. 20 were built.
    5. While it was considered inferior to it's rivals, it's design featured several innovations that would become commonplace in later designs.

  20. #7770
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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Ok guys, here goes another one...

    1. Twin Engined
    2. Monoplane
    3. Designed and built for a contingency that didn't happen.
    4. 20 were built.
    5. While it was considered inferior to it's rivals, it's design featured several innovations that would become commonplace in later designs.
    6. This was only the second aircraft built by this company. The first was a record breaker of its own.

  21. #7771
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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Ok guys, here goes another one...

    1. Twin Engined
    2. Monoplane
    3. Designed and built for a contingency that didn't happen.
    4. 20 were built.
    5. While it was considered inferior to it's rivals, it's design featured several innovations that would become commonplace in later designs.
    6. This was only the second aircraft built by this company. The first was a record breaker of its own.
    7. It was a bit underpowered.
    8. Since only 20 were built, it wasnt worth keeping them in service, and they were sold as surplus. They sold for about 1/3 the price of other aicraft of the same type.
    9. Some of these were used to form a new frieght company . And it's name was soon changed to honor the unit they flew and fought with during the war.

  22. #7772
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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    RB-1 Conestoga[/b]was a twin-engine,stainless steelcargo aircraftdesigned for theUnited States NavyduringWorld War IIby theBudd CompanyofPhiladelphia,Pennsylvania. Although it did not see service in a combat theater, it pioneered design innovations later incorporated in modern military cargo aircraft.

    [edit]Design and development

    World War II created a great demand for military transport aircraft in the United States. Because of initial fears of a shortage ofaluminum, theWar Departmentexplored the use of other materials for aircraft construction. Budd, the developer of theshotweldtechnique for welding stainless steel and a manufacturer of stainless steel railroad cars, automobile, bus, and truck bodies, hired an aeronautical engineering staff and worked with theU. S. Navyto develop a new twin-engine transport aircraft constructed primarily of stainless steel. The U.S. Navy accepted the proposal for the new aircraft, and placed an order for 200, to be designatedRB-1. TheU.S. Army Air Forces(USAAF) followed with an order for 600, designatedC-93.

    The Conestoga was a twin-engine high-wingmonoplanewithtricycle landing gear. The elevated flight deck was contained in a distinctive, almost spherical nose section. Its two 1,200hp (890kW)Pratt & WhitneyR-1830-92 air cooled 14-cylinder, twin-row,radial engines, the same engines fitted to theC-47, drove three-bladedHamilton StandardHydromatic constant-speed, full-featheringpropellersand powered a 24-volt electrical system. While the fuselage was thin-gauge stainless steel, only a portion of the wing was made of the metal; the trailing section of the wing and all control surfaces were fabric-covered.

    [edit]Innovations

    A RB-1 demonstrates its loading ramp

    The RB-1/C-93 was radical for its day, introducing many of the features now standard in military transports. The flight deck could accommodate three crew members, pilot and copilot side-by-side, the navigator behind them. Stairs connected the flight deck to the cargo area, which was 25 feet (7.6m) long with an unobstructed cross-section of 8 × 8 feet (2.4m) throughout its length. Cargo loading and unloading could be accomplished in two ways: through 40 × 60inch (102 × 152cm) doors on both sides of thefuselageor by an electrically operated 10 × 8 foot (3.0 × 2.4 m) ramp at the aft end of the cargo area under the upswepttail. The loading ramp, accessed by manually operated clamshell doors, along with the tricycle landing gear, meant cargo could be loaded/unloaded at truck-bed height. A manually operated two-ton (907kg) hoist for unloading trucks and a one-ton winch for pulling cargo up the ramp were also provided in the cargo area. The aircraft could accommodate:

    • 24paratroopers, or
    • 24 stretchers and 16 sitting wounded, or
    • 9,600 pounds of cargo, or
    • a 1½ ton truck, or
    • The largest ambulance in use by the U.S. military
    • Operational history

      The prototype first flew from the Budd Red Lion Factory Airfield in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on 31 October 1943, piloted by Guy Miller.[1]The prototype had a takeoff run when empty of just 650 feet, and could carry a maximum payload of 10,400 pounds with a takeoff run of 920 feet.[2]However, the aircraft demonstrated greater than expected fuel consumption; the range with a standard payload was only 700 miles, 650 miles with a maximum payload.[2]Three prototype aircraft:NX37097,NX41810, andNC45354were built; one was used for testing radio equipment, while the other two were used for flight test evaluations.[1][3]During testing, a few aircraft had difficulty with the simultaneous deployment of the right and left landing gear. With the same engines as the C-47, but with 3,000 pounds more weight (empty), the aircraft was relatively underpowered; it was reportedly said that for an aircraft built by a railroad car company, it indeed handled like one.

      At the Budd factory and airfield in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, there were construction delays due to cost overruns and problems with stainless steel fabrication. By late 1943, aluminum production had been increased with the construction of new processing facilities, and other more conventional cargo aircraft (such as theCurtiss C-46 Commandoand theDouglas C-47 Skytrain) were being produced in large numbers. This caused the Army to cancel its order for the C-93 and the Navy to reduce its RB-1 order from 200 to 25, of which 17 were delivered in March 1944.

      On 13 April 1944, during aNaval Air Training Command(NATC) evaluation flight of RB-1 prototype U.S. NavyNX37097atPatuxent River NAS, Maryland, the aircraft crashed, killing one of the crew.[4]The aircraft was damaged beyond repair and written off, but the pilot reported that the stainless steel construction of the aircraft contributed to saving his life.

      Production RB-1 aircraft never entered squadron service with the Navy, but a few were briefly used byNaval Air Stationsas utility aircraft. With only 17 aircraft in inventory, the RB-1 was not feasible to maintain on the active list, and it was retired from U.S. Navy service in early 1945. The extant RB-1s were then transferred to theWar Assets Administration(WAA) to be sold as war surplus. In 1945, the WAA sold 12 Conestogas to theNational Skyway Freight Corp[5]for $28,642 each at a time when new C-47s were selling for approximately $100,000 each. The new company, founded by members of theAVGFlying Tigersimmediately sold four RB-1 aircraft to other buyers, which paid for the entire WAA contract.[5]

      The seven remaining National Skyways aircraft were used to transport a variety of cargo, shipping fruit and furniture from its base inLong Beach, California.[N 1]Pilots reported that the Budd transports were temperamental; in particular, exhaust stacks kept falling off and causing engine fires.[5]There were three more crashes of the Conestogas while in service with National Skyway Freight, one each inVirginia,New Mexico, andMichigan.[5][N 2]The crash in Virginia was a belly landing at a country club brought on by fuel exhaustion as the result of weather-related problems. The Albuquerque, New Mexico crash was apparently due to pilot error when the exhausted pilots fell asleep; they awoke in time to make a forced landing, but pilot and copilot were killed when they were thrown through the windshield and the aircraft skidded over them; the flight engineer survived.[5]

      In 1947, the U.S. Army (and later the U.S. Air Force) gave National Skyway Freight a large contract for trans-Pacific freight, for which it leased military aircraft. The company changed its name toFlying Tigerand replaced the RB-1s with C-47s for its U.S. freight routes; the RB-1s were sold off to other buyers. One of these aircraft, a prototype RB-1, "NC45354" was sold to theTucker Motor Companyto transport its demonstration1948 Tucker Sedanto auto shows around the U.S.; it was reportedly later abandoned at an airfield in Oakland, California after repeated mechanical troubles.[5]

      [edit]Survivors

      RB-1 at the Pima Air Museum

      A single unrestored Budd RB-1 is on display at thePima Air MuseuminTucson,Arizona.

      [edit]Specifications (RB-1)

      General characteristics

      • Crew:2
      • Capacity:24
      • Length:68 ft 0 in (20.73 m)
      • Wingspan:100 ft 0 in (30.48 m)
      • Height:31 ft 9 in (9.68 m)
      • Wing area:1,400 ft2(130.06 m2)
      • Empty weight:20156 lb (9143 kg)
      • Gross weight:33860 lb (15359 kg)
      • Powerplant:2 ×Pratt & Whitney R-1830-92 air cooled radial engine, 1200 hp (890 kW)each[/list]

        Performance

        • Maximum speed:197 mph (317 km/h)
        • Cruise speed:165 mph (266 km/h)
        • Range:700 miles (1127 km)[/list]

          [edit]

          [/list]
          Semper Fi Mac

          [edit]

    Look towards the Horizon......your death awaits you there So Enjoy today ,,,,,,

  23. #7773
    zippome's Avatar
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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Thats the one Uncljoe!
    I personally like the story of crash landing one in a graveyard and the copilot disappears into the night... And one crashing and being turned into a Hamburger stand.
    O.k . Uncle, You're UP!
    Thanks,
    Zip

  24. #7774
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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    This was the first aircraft that the Budd co. built.
    Aviation

    In 1930, the company made its first foray into the aviation industry by signing contracts to manufacture aircraft wheels and stainless steel wing ribs. Enea Bossi joined the company as the head of stainless steel research to supervise the design and construction of the 4-seat biplane amphibian aircraft Budd BB-1 Pioneer. It was the first aircraft with a structure built out of stainless steel.[6] This was the first aircraft for the Budd Company, and it made its first flight in 1931.[7] Built under Restricted License NR749,[8] its design utilized concepts developed for the Savoia-Marchetti S-31 and was powered by a single 210 horsepower (160 kW) Kinner C-5 five-cylinder radial engine.[9]



    The stainless steel construction process for the BB-1 was patented in 1942.[10] At the time, stainless steel was not considered practical; and only one BB-1 was built. It logged about 1,000 flying hours while touring the United States and Europe. In 1934, this plane was stripped of its fabric covering and its lower wing, and was mounted outside the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia, where it remains to this day as the longest continuous display of any airplane.[8] The plane has been memorialized in the children’s book Spirited Philadelphia Adventure by Deirdre Cimino.[11][12]



    During World War II, Budd designed and built the RB-1 transport airplane for the U.S. Navy using much stainless steel in place of aluminum. Only 25 were built but, after the war, 14 aircraft found their way to the fledgling Flying Tiger Line and provided a good start for that company.

    Thanks.

    Zip.

  25. #7775

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Uncljoe; you are up Sir. Please post your question. Thanks; Ernie P.


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