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  1. #7851

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    It's the Blackburn Buccaneer.

    I yield the floor to wphilb : Please post your question.


  2. #7852
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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: JohnnyS

    It's the Blackburn Buccaneer.

    I yield the floor to wphilb : Please post your question.

    Yep:
    Blackburn/Hawker Siddeley Buccaneer
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blackburn_Buccaneer

    """
    The Buccaneer had been designed specifically as a maritime nuclear strike aircraft. Its intended weapon was a nuclear air-to-surface missile codenamed Green Cheese, but this weapon's development was cancelled, and in its place was the unguided 2,000 pound (900 kg) Red Beard, which had been developed for the Canberra.
    ...
    The small wing of the Buccaneer was suited to high-speed flight at low level. Such a wing, however, did not generate the lift that was essential for carrier operations. Therefore the wing and horizontal stabiliser were "blown" by bleeding compressor gas from the engine through surface vents; this was known as Boundary layer control or BLC, and had the effect of energising and smoothing the boundary layer airflow, which significantly reduced airflow separation at the back of the wing (and therefore decreased stall speed) and increased effectiveness of trailing edge control surfaces including flaps and ailerons. Before landing, the pilot would open the BLC vents as well as lower the flaps to achieve slow, stable flight. A consequence of the blown wing was that the engines were required to run at high power for low-speed flight in order to generate sufficient compressor gas for blowing. Blackburn's solution to this situation was to provide a large air brake.
    ...
    Primary users: Royal Navy, Royal Air Force, South African Air Force
    ...
    On 28 March 1967, Buccaneers from RNAS Lossiemouth bombed the shipwrecked supertanker Torrey Canyon off the western coast of Cornwall to make the oil blaze
    The Buccaneer was deployed in combat operations during the 1991 Gulf War, when 12 examples were rushed to the area to provide a laser designation capability for British aircraft. RAF Tornados attacking with anti-runway munitions were being lost to the large amounts of light anti-aircraft weaponry defending the airfields. As a result, attacks changed to attacking from 20,000 ft with guided bombs.
    Buccaneers flew 218 missions, both designating for other aircraft and dropping 48 laser-guided bombs themselves.

    """

    wphilb, have a go now.

  3. #7853

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    OK, here goes, what pilot

    1) This pilot was one of his countries leading aces
    2) He flew aircraft built by three different countries during his wartime service

    Whit

  4. #7854

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: wphilb

    OK, here goes, what pilot

    1) This pilot was one of his countries leading aces
    2) He flew aircraft built by three different countries during his wartime service

    Whit
    Well, Juutilainen comes to mind pretty quickly. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Eino Ilmari "Illu" Juutilainen (21 February 1914 – 21 February 1999) was a fighter pilot of the Ilmavoimat (Finnish Air Force), and the top scoring non-German fighter pilot of all time. This makes him the top flying ace of the Finnish Air Force, leading all Finnish pilots in score against Soviet aircraft in World War II (1939–40 and 1941–44), with 94 confirmed aerial combat victories in 437 sorties. He himself claimed 126 victories. He achieved 34 of his victories while flying the Brewster Buffalo fighter.

    Juutilainen is the top scoring Finnish fighter pilot. He flew Fokker D.XXI, Brewster Buffalo and Messerschmitt Bf 109 fighters. He was one of the four people who twice received the highest Finnish military decoration, the Mannerheim Cross, and is considered the highest scoring non-German ace of all time. Juutilainen finished the war without a single hit to his plane from enemy fighter airplanes (once he was forced to land after a friendly anti-aircraft gun fired at his Bf 109). Like Japanese fighter ace Saburo Sakai, Juutilainen never lost a wingman in combat. He also scored the first radar-assisted victory in the Finnish Air Force on 24 March 1943, when he was guided to a Soviet Pe-2 by a German radar operator, who was testing out the freshly-delivered radar sets, that officially became operational 3 days later.

  5. #7855

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz



  6. #7856

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Not the pilot I'm thinking of, but...

    1) This pilot was one of his countries leading aces2) He flew aircraft built by three different countries during his wartime service3) He flew both biplanes and monoplanes

    Fair warning, #1 is true but subject to qualification...

    Whit

  7. #7857

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Not the pilot I was thinking of, but...

    1) This pilot was one or his country's leading aces
    2) He flew planes built by three different countries during his wartime service
    3) He flew both biplanes and monoplanes

    Fair warning, # 1 is subject to qualification....

    Whit

    PS admin pls kill my two edited posts above, IPAD editor glitches forced three re-typings

  8. #7858

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    what pilot?

    1) This pilot was one or his country's leading aces
    2) He flew planes built by three different countries during his wartime service
    3) He flew both biplanes and monoplanes
    4) He was killed in combat

    Fair warning, # 1 is subject to qualification....

    Whit

  9. #7859

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    what pilot?

    1) This pilot was one or his country's leading aces
    2) He flew planes built by three different countries during his wartime service
    3) He flew both biplanes and monoplanes
    4) He was killed in combat
    5) He died flying an American built aircraft but was misidentified as a
    Spitfire


    Fair warning, # 1 is subject to qualification....

    Whit



  10. #7860

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: wphilb

    what pilot?

    1) This pilot was one or his country's leading aces
    2) He flew planes built by three different countries during his wartime service
    3) He flew both biplanes and monoplanes
    4) He was killed in combat
    5) He died flying an American built aircraft but was misidentified as a
    Spitfire


    Fair warning, # 1 is subject to qualification....

    Whit



    Not sure about the qualification on number one, but I know a Polish pilot born in Kiev, who served in the Polish Air Force, and flew RAF and American aircraft. How about Eugeniusz Horbaczewski? Thanks; Ernie P.


    Eugeniusz Horbaczewski (28 September 1917 - 18 August 1944) was a Polish fighter pilot, a flying ace of the World War II, also known as "Dziubek" (literally is the diminutive of 'the beak' in Polish). According to official lists, Horbaczewski was the third highest scoring Polish fighter ace, with 16.5 confirmed kills (16 individual and one shared) and one probable kill. He was awarded several decorations, among others Virtuti Militari IV class (posthumously) and V class, four times Polish Cross of Valour, Distinguished Service Order (posthumously) and Distinguished Flying Cross (twice).

    Horbaczewski was born in Kiev, then his family moved to Brzesc. At school, he compleed a gliding course. In 1938 he entered cadet flying school in DΔ™blin, from which he graduated in 1939.

    On 18 August 1944 Horbaczewski led his squadron of 12 aircraft over France on a 'Rodeo' mission, despite being ill with flu. The Poles, using an element of surprise, attacked a group of 60 Fw 190s of Jagdgeschwaders 2 and 26, over an airfield near Beauvais. Horbaczewski quickly shot down three Focke-Wulfs, but went missing during the dogfight. In 1947 the wreck of his Mustang with his body was found crashed near Valennes.

    Exact circumstances are unclear; he was probably shot down in combat by an aircraft of II./JG 26. The Poles were credited with shooting down 16 aircraft in this encounter, with the only loss their Squadron leader (according to German documents, eight Fw 190 of JG 26 and four of JG 2 were destroyed).

  11. #7861

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Lets see if this editor will behave, that was not the man I'm thinking of,

    What pilot?

    1) This pilot was one or his country's leading aces
    2) He flew planes built by three different countries during his wartime service
    3) He flew both biplanes and monoplanes
    4) He was killed in combat
    5) He died flying an American built aircraft but was misidentified as a
    Spitfire
    6) He lead his country in two categories of victories, but didn't exactly shoot down a mountainous amount of enemy aircraft

    Whit

    ORIGINAL: Ernie P.


    ORIGINAL: wphilb

    what pilot?

    1) This pilot was one or his country's leading aces
    2) He flew planes built by three different countries during his wartime service
    3) He flew both biplanes and monoplanes
    4) He was killed in combat
    5) He died flying an American built aircraft but was misidentified as a
    Spitfire


    Fair warning, # 1 is subject to qualification....

    Whit



    Not sure about the qualification on number one, but I know a Polish pilot born in Kiev, who served in the Polish Air Force, and flew RAF and American aircraft. How about Eugeniusz Horbaczewski? Thanks; Ernie P.


    Eugeniusz Horbaczewski (28 September 1917 - 18 August 1944) was a Polish fighter pilot, a flying ace of the World War II, also known as "Dziubek" (literally is the diminutive of 'the beak' in Polish). According to official lists, Horbaczewski was the third highest scoring Polish fighter ace, with 16.5 confirmed kills (16 individual and one shared) and one probable kill. He was awarded several decorations, among others Virtuti Militari IV class (posthumously) and V class, four times Polish Cross of Valour, Distinguished Service Order (posthumously) and Distinguished Flying Cross (twice).

    Horbaczewski was born in Kiev, then his family moved to Brzesc. At school, he compleed a gliding course. In 1938 he entered cadet flying school in DΔ™blin, from which he graduated in 1939.

    On 18 August 1944 Horbaczewski led his squadron of 12 aircraft over France on a 'Rodeo' mission, despite being ill with flu. The Poles, using an element of surprise, attacked a group of 60 Fw 190s of Jagdgeschwaders 2 and 26, over an airfield near Beauvais. Horbaczewski quickly shot down three Focke-Wulfs, but went missing during the dogfight. In 1947 the wreck of his Mustang with his body was found crashed near Valennes.

    Exact circumstances are unclear; he was probably shot down in combat by an aircraft of II./JG 26. The Poles were credited with shooting down 16 aircraft in this encounter, with the only loss their Squadron leader (according to German documents, eight Fw 190 of JG 26 and four of JG 2 were destroyed).

  12. #7862

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    What pilot?

    1) This pilot was one or his country's leading aces
    2) He flew planes built by three different countries during his wartime service
    3) He flew both biplanes and monoplanes
    4) He was killed in combat
    5) He died flying an American built aircraft but was misidentified as a
    Spitfire
    6) He lead his country in two categories of victories, but didn't exactly shoot down a mountainous amount of enemy aircraft
    7) He was his country's leading biplane ace (most kills while flying a biplane).

    Whit



  13. #7863

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: wphilb


    What pilot?

    1) This pilot was one or his country'sΒ*leading aces
    2) He flew planes built by three different countries during his wartime service
    3) He flew both biplanes and monoplanes
    4) He was killed in combat
    5) He died flying an American built aircraft but was misidentified as a
    Spitfire
    6) He lead his country in two categories of victories, but didn't exactly shoot down a mountainous amount of enemy aircraft
    7) He was his country's leading biplane ace (most kills while flying a biplane).

    Whit



    Could you be speaking of Finnish ace Kapteeni Paavo David β€˜Pate’ Berg? Most of the clues seem to fit. Thanks; Ernie P.



    At the time of his death, Berg had claimed 5 biplane victories and a total of 10 victories, scored on 100 sorties.

    "Pate" Berg was born in Lahti on 23 November 1911.
    He received flying training in 1930-31 and was accepted to KadK on 2 June 1931.
    He was promoted to luutnantti (lieutenant) on 16 May 1935 and posted to LLv 26 on 31 January 1938.

    The LLv 26’s pilots entered in combat for the first time with Gladiators on 2 February 1940.

    On 30 October, 1/LLv 32 was transferred to Nummela to neutralize the Red air forces which was operating from TΓ€cktom airfield, Hanko.

    On 1 November, kapteeni Berg’s pair of 1/LLv 32 tried to lure the Russians into combat over Hanko. Berg and ylikersantti Uuno Alppinen (CU-563) claimed a shared I-16 from 13 IAP-KBF, which crashed into the ground. Despite the Finnish top cover pair, the Russian top cover swarn downed the Finnish lead aircraft, killing Berg.
    It seems that the Soviet ace Starshiy Leytenant Vasiliy F. Golubev and Starshiy Leytenant Gennadiy D. Tsokolayev of 13 IAP-KBF shot down Berg. The war diary of 13 IAP-KBF described the combat:

    β€œAt 14:43 [Moscow time] two I-16 planes took off from TΓ€ktom airfield. The pilots of the pair were Starshiy Leytenant Gennadiy Tsokolayev and Leytenant Ivan Tvogorov. A while later another pair began their take-off, but the Finnish artillery began to shell the airfield, when only one I-16 piloted by Starshiy Leytenant Vasiliy Golubev managed to get airborne while his wingman had to interrupt the start. A moment later two I-153 aircraft took off piloted by Starshiy Leytenant Aleksandr Ovtsinnikov and Leytenant Grigoriy Semyonov, but they did not participate in the whole combat. Two Spitfires attacked Tsokolayev’s pair from the sun. Tsokolayev dodged with a steep bank and managed to avoid the attack, while Tvogorov’s aircraft received hits and became damaged. The wounded pilot was able to bring back his aircraft to the airfield, but it broke up in the landing. In the meantime, Golubev attacked the Spitfire from the sun, which had harassed Tsokolayev and shot it down. The downing was shared between Golubev and Tsokolayev.”

  14. #7864

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz



    You are correct!

    He was the Top Finnish biplane ace and the top Finish Gladiator Ace as well.  

    Pate" Berg was born in Lahti on 23 November 1911.



    He received flying training in 1930-31 and was accepted to KadK on 2 June 1931.



    He was promoted to luutnantti (lieutenant) on 16 May 1935 and posted to LLv 26 on 31 January 1938.



    The LLv 26’s pilots entered in combat for the first time with Gladiators on 2 February 1940.
    At 10:40, Luutnantti Berg was engaged in combat with a reported six I-153s above Hanko and shot down one of them.
    38 IAP reported that they attacked Turku AF base. Kapitan V. P. Teplyakov claimed two Bulldogs in combat while Kapitan Sergeyev and Starshiy Leytenant Ivanov claimed three Bulldogs destroyed on the ground.
    Jorma “Joppe” Karhunen described Berg’s first claim during the Winter War (Karhunen was at the time a Fokker D.XXI pilot and flight commander in 1/LLv 24):

    "We shared the ice base at Littoinen near Turku in the beginning of February 1940. LLv 26’s Gladiators were flown here after they had been assembled in Sweden.
    On the 2nd of February I saw Berg climbing from Littoinen in GL-263. Air raid sirens were screaming in Turku. Time passed and I saw Berg land. He ran toward me and told me:
    "I shot down a Chaika (Polikarpov I-153), it crashed on the ice. My own aircraft has hits, can you borrow me a Fokker so I can go and have a look at the wreck?"
    As he was very excited about his first kill, I gave him my permission to use one of our Fokkers. Berg took off and returned after some time. Unfortunately he had damaged the Fokkers undercarriage making a harsh landing on the ice, so the Fokker had to be repaired at the state aircraft factory at Tampere overnight."


    Berg’s own combat report was quite short:

    “A squadron of Chaikas bounced me from the above. I received several hits on my Gladiator, but a fast evasive turn prevented any further damage. I decided to test the manoeuvrability of my new mount and the nearest three-plane Chaika section wanted to fight with me. The rest of them went away.
    The Chaikas made a tight turn to try finishing me off again. I made a turn too and I discovered that my GL was able to turn with the Chaikas. I was not even warmed up when I was able to get into a firing position behind one of them. I tightened my turn to the extreme and thus I was able to pull enough deflection and my short burst hit his engine.
    The plane I fired on went down towards the ice. His comrades decided to turn for home, and my victim made a landing on the ice. It looked only slightly damaged. I decided to fly back to Littoinen because I feared the hits on my own aircraft might be critical.”


    Berg’s victim was I-153 c/n 6469 from 38 IAP flown by Starshiy Leytenant N. I. Bedarev (originally from 4./25 IAP), who was taken POW.
    The Finnish didn’t suffer any losses.



    Berg and the eight Gladiators of detachment Heinilä left Littoinen on 4 February and headed for Utti to be a part of 1/LLv 26.



    Berg took turns with vääpeli Valio Porvari flying interception missions.



    On 18 February, enemy bombers heavily attacked Vyborg. At 11:30, luutnantti Berg (GL-279) destroyed two and damaged one SB out of a formation of forty encountered near Kouvola.
    It seems that he had been in combat with bombers from 54 SBAP, which reported that 40 SBs escorted by twelve I-153s from 149 IAP attacked Kouvola. The bombs were dropped at 11:52-11:59. Three SBs were damaged by heavy a/a machinegun fire. 3. and 5. eskadrilyas were attacked over the target by a reported five Bulldogs and nine Fokker D.XXIs. In the following combat, the gunners claimed two Bulldogs, while own losses were limited to two damaged SBs: one piloted by Leytenant V. V. Butrim received 22 bullet holes, mainly in the left wing and navigator’s cockpit, and landed safely at own airfield, while the second SB flown by Leytenant N. I. Ivanov was forced to land at Kotly airfield, navigator Leytenant A. A. Smirnov being wounded in right hand.
    The I-153s of 149 IAP reported combat south of the target with two Fokker D.XXIs and four Bulldogs and claimed three victories. Mayor Plygunov claimed one Bulldog, Mayor Kuldin claimed one Fokker D.XXI and a second Fokker D.XXI was claimed by Leytenant Vladimir Vasilevich Litvinenko. Near the target, the fighters met heavy a/a fire, Leytenant Litvinenko’s I-153 got 36 holes from the close explosion of a shell. Nevertheless he safely landed at the own airfield.



    On 19 February, luutnantti Berg’s three-strong patrol was chasing a formation of 32 SB bombers when it was engaged in combat with various I-153 fighters above Sippola at 15:25. One of the enemy fighters was shot down by Berg and another was shared between luutnantti Poul Christensen and vänrikki Lauri Sihvo. The rest of the enemy fighters broke off and headed towards Suomenlahti. The two shot down I-153s were from 149 IAP, 7 VA and were flown by Leytenant Yentsh and Leytenant Osipov.



    Berg later told about his experience with Chaikas:

    "The Chaika has a back armour plate for the pilot so firing at them directly behind with Gladiators rifle-calibre guns is useless. Dogfighting them is the best chance to get a Chaika if you are good at it."


    Berg himself had flown the Bulldog for nearly 5 years before the war and thus he had become a skilful pilot and a marvellous deflection shooter.



    On 20 February, luutnantti Berg attacked a detachment of thirty bombers above Kouvola. He attacked a bomber in the middle of the formation but this was a mistake, as he ended up in the middle of murderous crossfire from the bomber formation. His Gladiator caught fire and Berg opened the canopy and unstrapped himself to jump. He, however, got stuck when his boot got jammed in the cockpit and he struggled for a few moments, trying to remove his stuck boot and the flames burnt his face before he fell free from his blazing Gladiator. Later Berg heard that the SB he had attacked dived burning into ground. He was hospitalised for the rest of the winter war. It is possible that he had been in combat with SBs from 48 SBAP
    On the same day alikersantti Ilmari Joensuu shot down a DB-3 over Laatokka.
    During the day three SBs from 18 SBAP and 54 SBAP, 7 VA, were lost.



    With five aerial victories during the Winter War, he was one of the most successful Finnish Gladiator pilots and a "real" ace with biplane fighters.



    After the end of the Winter War he was posted to LLv 32 on 27 March 1940, as letueen päällikönä (flight leader), flying Fokker D.XXI and on 30 April 1940 promoted to kapteeni (Captain).



    After the mobilization on 18 June 1941 he was posted as flight leader of 1/LLv 32, which was based at Hyvinkää and equipped with six Fokker D.XXIs (with Mercury engines) (these were replaced with Curtiss Hawk 75s in the middle of July).



    The Continuation War started on 25 June 1941 and Berg continued to act as leader of 1/LLv 32 until 13 August 1941.
    He returned as flight leader of 1/LLv 32 on 3 September.




    Kapteeni Berg is pointing out a patched bullet-hole on his Curtis CU-533.


    He claimed his first victory in the Continuation War at midday on 17 July when he was involved in combat with I-153s from 10 KOAE-KBF, of which he claimed one.



    During a sortie between 13:20-15:10 on 1 September, kapteeni Berg (CU-557) and vänrikki K. Karhila (CU-502) claimed a shared balloon over Jääski.



    At 10:55 on 3 September, kapteeni Berg’s eight-aircraft strong 1st Flight jumped I-153s from 7 IAP over Siestarjoki. In the ensuing fifteen minutes long combat seven I-153s were claimed. Finnish pilots claiming in this combat were kapteeni Berg, luutantti Veikko Evinen (CU-560), vänrikki Kyösti Karhila (CU-566), vänrikki Sakari Alapuro (CU-553), vänrikki Jaakko Hillo (CU-558), ylikersantti Uuno Alppinen (CU-556) and kersantti Jaakko Kajanto (CU-570).
    Vänrikki Karhila described the combat:

    At 10:55-11:05 hours. On a surveillance mission we met 5-6 I-153s. I saw one break off to the sea. I was about 1,000m higher. I caught it easily and got by surprise behind its tail. I opened fire from 20m off and the plane caught instantly fire and crashed in the sea. My plane was CUw-566.”


    It seems that 7 IAP lost three I-153s, 235 ShAP one I-152 and 153 IAP one I-16.



    On 19 September, Kapteeni Berg’s eight-plane 1/LLv 32 engaged five MiG-3s of 7 IAP over Ohalatva between 13:20-13:30 and destroyed four them with the fifth as a probable. Finnish pilots claming in this combat were kapteeni Berg (three MiG-3s), vänrikki Kyösti Karhila (CU-560) (1 probable), ylikersantti Uuno Alppinen (CU-566) (one shared) and kersantti Jaakko Kajanto (CU-558) (one shared).
    Berg recounted:

    “At about 3,000 m altitude I saw among the clouds at first four enemy aircraft flying to the opposite direction. I took a diving turn and went after them. Just after coming out of the cloud I saw a bit lower one I-17 only 200 m away. I fired at it and it started smoking instantly and went down diving on its back. I followed the others, which still numbered as four. I opened fire on the nearest, when it pulled down to left pulling up again. I followed and fired when it started to smoke. At the same time two more (Alppinen and Kajanto) came to fire at it. I radioed that there are more on the left side and turned to left to look for a new target. To the left I saw right down to the surface two I-17s, which banked to the left and continued thereafter to south. I caught quickly one of them, which was remaining behind. When I fired at it, it began bank to the left, I pulled after it firing every now and then, getting closer all the time. When I got the bursts even a couple of times ahead of hit, it suddenly flipped to the left crashing. The I-17 was easily caught by the CU. My plane was CU-563.”


    It seems that 7 IAP lost two MiG-3s and 153 IAP one.



    On 30 October, 1/LLv 32 was transferred to Nummela to neutralize the Red air forces which was operating from Täcktom airfield, Hanko.



    On 1 November, kapteeni Berg’s pair of 1/LLv 32 tried to lure the Russians into combat over Hanko. Berg and ylikersantti Uuno Alppinen (CU-563) claimed a shared I-16 from 13 IAP-KBF, which crashed into the ground. Despite the Finnish top cover pair, the Russian top cover swarn downed the Finnish lead aircraft, killing Berg.
    It seems that the Soviet ace Starshiy Leytenant Vasiliy F. Golubev and Starshiy Leytenant Gennadiy D. Tsokolayev of 13 IAP-KBF shot down Berg. The war diary of 13 IAP-KBF described the combat:

    “At 14:43 [Moscow time] two I-16 planes took off from Täktom airfield. The pilots of the pair were Starshiy Leytenant Gennadiy Tsokolayev and Leytenant Ivan Tvogorov. A while later another pair began their take-off, but the Finnish artillery began to shell the airfield, when only one I-16 piloted by Starshiy Leytenant Vasiliy Golubev managed to get airborne while his wingman had to interrupt the start. A moment later two I-153 aircraft took off piloted by Starshiy Leytenant Aleksandr Ovtsinnikov and Leytenant Grigoriy Semyonov, but they did not participate in the whole combat. Two Spitfires attacked Tsokolayev’s pair from the sun. Tsokolayev dodged with a steep bank and managed to avoid the attack, while Tvogorov’s aircraft received hits and became damaged. The wounded pilot was able to bring back his aircraft to the airfield, but it broke up in the landing. In the meantime, Golubev attacked the Spitfire from the sun, which had harassed Tsokolayev and shot it down. The downing was shared between Golubev and Tsokolayev.”


    Tvogorov survived the war with 4 victories and today lives in Yevpatoriya, Crimea.



    At the time of his death, Berg had claimed 5 biplane victories and a total of 10 victories, scored on 100 sorties.
    During his career, he was awarded with the Vapauden Risti of the 4th Class.



    I'm also baffled about this thread, I checked repeatedly yesterday and today and saw no updates, got a PM from Ernie and went and looked again and there it was. As of this moment no email update on this thread despite getting many from other threads up to the second. This is not my first time on this site and I'm aware of how updates and subscriptions work. [:'(] On this thread I get the notification days later....

    Whit

    Ernie, you're up!


  15. #7865

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Whit;

    Thank you, Sir. I've also noticed that updates don't always show up right away. The page numbers, particularly, seem to lag. Often there can be several new posts before the new page number takes effect.

    Since we seem to be on a roll with pilots, I'll keep it going. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What ace do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) He demonstrated a very early interest in aviation.

    (2) He came from very humble and rural roots.

  16. #7866

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    A morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What ace do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) He demonstrated a very early interest in aviation.

    (2) He came from very humble and rural roots.

    (3) As a child, he spent many hours watching hunting birds in the wild.

  17. #7867

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    And an evening clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What ace do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) He demonstrated a very early interest in aviation.

    (2) He came from very humble and rural roots.

    (3) As a child, he spent many hours watching hunting birds in the wild.

    (4) He achieved success both in the air as a successful pilot, and on the ground as a successful administrator and leader.

  18. #7868

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Morning clue. This ace may not be a household name, but he is among the greats. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What ace do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) He demonstrated a very early interest in aviation.

    (2) He came from very humble and rural roots.

    (3) As a child, he spent many hours watching hunting birds in the wild.

    (4) He achieved success both in the air as a successful pilot, and on the ground as a successful administrator and leader.

    (5) Although a noted ace, there is a lot of dispute about his exact score; but no dispute over his success in training and leading his men.

  19. #7869

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Noon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What ace do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) He demonstrated a very early interest in aviation.

    (2) He came from very humble and rural roots.

    (3) As a child, he spent many hours watching hunting birds in the wild.

    (4) He achieved success both in the air as a successful pilot, and on the ground as a successful administrator and leader.

    (5) Although a noted ace, there is a lot of dispute about his exact score; but no dispute over his success in training and leading his men.

    (6) He was a noted test pilot; and helped formulate aerial tactics.

  20. #7870

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Evening clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What ace do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) He demonstrated a very early interest in aviation.

    (2) He came from very humble and rural roots.

    (3) As a child, he spent many hours watching hunting birds in the wild.

    (4) He achieved success both in the air as a successful pilot, and on the ground as a successful administrator and leader.

    (5) Although a noted ace, there is a lot of dispute about his exact score; but no dispute over his success in training and leading his men.

    (6) He was a noted test pilot; and helped formulate aerial tactics.

    (7) He tested an early model of what became his favorite type of aircraft.

  21. #7871

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    A morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What ace do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) He demonstrated a very early interest in aviation.

    (2) He came from very humble and rural roots.

    (3) As a child, he spent many hours watching hunting birds in the wild.

    (4) He achieved success both in the air as a successful pilot, and on the ground as a successful administrator and leader.

    (5) Although a noted ace, there is a lot of dispute about his exact score; but no dispute over his success in training and leading his men.

    (6) He was a noted test pilot; and helped formulate aerial tactics.

    (7) He tested an early model of what became his favorite type of aircraft.

    (8) Considered a fine athlete, he was rather large for a fighter pilot.

  22. #7872

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Noon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What ace do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) He demonstrated a very early interest in aviation.

    (2) He came from very humble and rural roots.

    (3) As a child, he spent many hours watching hunting birds in the wild.

    (4) He achieved success both in the air as a successful pilot, and on the ground as a successful administrator and leader.

    (5) Although a noted ace, there is a lot of dispute about his exact score; but no dispute over his success in training and leading his men.

    (6) He was a noted test pilot; and helped formulate aerial tactics.

    (7) He tested an early model of what became his favorite type of aircraft.

    (8) Considered a fine athlete, he was rather large for a fighter pilot.

    (9) As a youth, he and his brother built several homemade aircraft, gliders and powered; in addition to many models.

  23. #7873
    Mein Duff's Avatar
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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Robin Olds??
    Fleet Brotherhood #5
    Half A Wing, Three Engines and A Prayer

  24. #7874

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


    ORIGINAL: Mein Duff

    Robin Olds??
    No, Sir; but here's another clue to reward your effort. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What ace do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) He demonstrated a very early interest in aviation.

    (2) He came from very humble and rural roots.

    (3) As a child, he spent many hours watching hunting birds in the wild.

    (4) He achieved success both in the air as a successful pilot, and on the ground as a successful administrator and leader.

    (5) Although a noted ace, there is a lot of dispute about his exact score; but no dispute over his success in training and leading his men.

    (6) He was a noted test pilot; and helped formulate aerial tactics.

    (7) He tested an early model of what became his favorite type of aircraft.

    (8) Considered a fine athlete, he was rather large for a fighter pilot.

    (9) As a youth, he and his brother built several homemade aircraft, gliders and powered; in addition to many models.

    (10) He was noted for being quiet, polite and soft spoken. He didn’t drink, seldom smoked, and stayed fit.

  25. #7875

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    RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

    Updates are definitely not working
    \"any crash you can walk away from is a good crash\" Launch pad Mcquack


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