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Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

Old 10-08-2013, 04:28 PM
  #8876
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Looking for a pilot.

1. Well known fighter pilot, though he was not an ace.

2. A lawyer before the war, and also an outstanding athlete.
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Old 10-08-2013, 05:56 PM
  #8877
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Swag.
F Lee Bailey
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Old 10-08-2013, 08:31 PM
  #8878
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A.M.Pozin
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Old 10-09-2013, 04:10 AM
  #8879
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Looking for a pilot.

1. Well known fighter pilot, though he was not an ace.

2. A lawyer before the war, and also an outstanding athlete.

3. Early in the war, he helped defend two other pilots at their court martial.
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Old 10-09-2013, 05:06 AM
  #8880
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Top_Gunn View Post
Looking for a pilot.

1. Well known fighter pilot, though he was not an ace.

2. A lawyer before the war, and also an outstanding athlete.

3. Early in the war, he helped defend two other pilots at their court martial.
Okay; that narrowed it down. But I think I'll let this one run for a while. It's too unusual a question to short stroke it. Thanks; Ernie P.
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Old 10-09-2013, 07:23 AM
  #8881
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Looking for a pilot.

1. Well known fighter pilot, though he was not an ace.

2. A lawyer before the war, and also an outstanding athlete.

3. Early in the war, he helped defend two other pilots at their court martial.

4. Shot down in an engagement in which he damaged two enemy planes, and was captured.

I think this one isn't going to go very long.
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Old 10-10-2013, 04:17 AM
  #8882
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Morning clue.

Looking for a pilot.

1. Well known fighter pilot, though he was not an ace.

2. A lawyer before the war, and also an outstanding athlete.

3. Early in the war, he helped defend two other pilots at their court martial.

4. Shot down in an engagement in which he damaged two enemy planes, and was captured.

5. A successful movie presented a somewhat fictionalized version of the events that made him well known. The movie's departures from historical accuracy were made primarily to allow American stars to play important roles.
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Old 10-10-2013, 10:26 AM
  #8883
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As Top_Gunn said, this one won't go much longer. More than suficient clues have been posted. Anyone? Thanks; Ernie P.
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Old 10-10-2013, 10:46 AM
  #8884
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Afternoon clue

Looking for a pilot.

1. Well known fighter pilot, though he was not an ace.

2. A lawyer before the war, and also an outstanding athlete.

3. Early in the war, he helped defend two other pilots at their court martial.

4. Shot down in an engagement in which he damaged two enemy planes, and was captured.

5. A successful movie presented a somewhat fictionalized version of the events that made him well known. The movie's departures from historical accuracy were made primarily to allow American stars to play important roles.

6. He did not survive the war.
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Old 10-11-2013, 05:58 AM
  #8885
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Top_Gunn View Post
Afternoon clue

Looking for a pilot.

1. Well known fighter pilot, though he was not an ace.

2. A lawyer before the war, and also an outstanding athlete.

3. Early in the war, he helped defend two other pilots at their court martial.

4. Shot down in an engagement in which he damaged two enemy planes, and was captured.

5. A successful movie presented a somewhat fictionalized version of the events that made him well known. The movie's departures from historical accuracy were made primarily to allow American stars to play important roles.

6. He did not survive the war.

How about Squadron Leader Roger Joyce Bushell? Thanks; Ernie P.


Squadron Leader Roger Joyce Bushell RAF (30 August 1910 – 29 March 1944) was an Auxiliary Air Force pilot who organised and led the famous escape from the German prisoner of war camp, Stalag Luft III. He was a victim of the Stalag Luft III murders. The escape was used as the basis for the film The Great Escape. The character played by Richard Attenborough, Roger Bartlett, is modelled on Roger Bushell.


Bushell was born in Springs, Transvaal, South Africa on 30 August 1910 to English parents Benjamin Daniel and Dorothy Wingate Bushell (née White). His father, a mining engineer, had emigrated to the country from Britain and he used his wealth to ensure that Roger received a first class education. He was first schooled in Johannesburg, then aged 14 went to Wellington College in Berkshire, England. In 1929, Bushell then went to Pembroke College, Cambridge to study law.

Keen on pursuing non-academic interests from an early age, Roger Bushell excelled in athletics and skied for Cambridge in races between 1930 and 1932 - captaining the team in 1931.

One of Bushell's passions and talents was skiing: in the early 1930s he was declared the fastest Briton in the male downhill category. He even had a black run named after him in St. Moritz, Switzerland, in recognition of the fact that he had set the fastest time for the run. He also won the slalom event of the annual Oxford-Cambridge ski race in 1931.

At an event in Canada, Bushell had an accident in which one of his skis narrowly missed his left eye, leaving him with a gash in the corner of it. Although he recovered from this accident, he still had a dark drooping in his left eye as a result of scarring from his stitches.

Bushell became fluent in French and German, with a good accent, which became extremely useful during his time as a prisoner of war.

Despite his sporting prospects, one of Bushell's primary wishes was to fly, and in 1932 he joined 601 Squadron Auxiliary Air Force, which was often referred to as "The Millionaires' Mob" because of the number of wealthy young men who paid their way solely to learn how to fly during training days (often at weekends).

Although Bushell was pursuing a career with the RAF he wasn't hampered in his attempts to become a barrister-at-Law, of Lincolns Inn, London.[2] From the outset of his legal career many commented on his ability as a lawyer, particularly in criminal defence. After a while, Bushell was appointed to military cases in prosecuting RAF personnel charged with various offences. These often involved pilots charged with dangerous flying. In October 1939, acting as assistant to Sir Patrick Hastings, he successfully defended two RAF pilots, John Freeborn and Paddy Byrne, court martialled after the friendly fire incident known as the Battle of Barking Creek. Byrne would later be incarcerated with Bushell at Stalag Luft III.

Bushell was given command of 92 Squadron in October 1939, and his promotion to squadron leader was confirmed on 1 January 1940.

During the squadron's first engagement with enemy aircraft on 23 May 1940, whilst on a patrol near Calais, Bushell was credited with damaging two Messerschmitt Bf 110 fighter aircraft of ZG 26 before being shot down himself, probably by future ace Oberleutnant Günther Specht. He crash-landed his Spitfire on German occupied ground and was captured before he had a chance to hide.

He became a POW and was sent to the Dulag luft transit camp near Frankfurt with all other captured aircrew.
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Old 10-11-2013, 05:58 AM
  #8886
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Top_Gunn View Post
Afternoon clue

Looking for a pilot.

1. Well known fighter pilot, though he was not an ace.

2. A lawyer before the war, and also an outstanding athlete.

3. Early in the war, he helped defend two other pilots at their court martial.

4. Shot down in an engagement in which he damaged two enemy planes, and was captured.

5. A successful movie presented a somewhat fictionalized version of the events that made him well known. The movie's departures from historical accuracy were made primarily to allow American stars to play important roles.

6. He did not survive the war.

How about Squadron Leader Roger Joyce Bushell? Thanks; Ernie P.


Squadron Leader Roger Joyce Bushell RAF (30 August 1910 – 29 March 1944) was an Auxiliary Air Force pilot who organised and led the famous escape from the German prisoner of war camp, Stalag Luft III. He was a victim of the Stalag Luft III murders. The escape was used as the basis for the film The Great Escape. The character played by Richard Attenborough, Roger Bartlett, is modelled on Roger Bushell.


Bushell was born in Springs, Transvaal, South Africa on 30 August 1910 to English parents Benjamin Daniel and Dorothy Wingate Bushell (née White). His father, a mining engineer, had emigrated to the country from Britain and he used his wealth to ensure that Roger received a first class education. He was first schooled in Johannesburg, then aged 14 went to Wellington College in Berkshire, England. In 1929, Bushell then went to Pembroke College, Cambridge to study law.

Keen on pursuing non-academic interests from an early age, Roger Bushell excelled in athletics and skied for Cambridge in races between 1930 and 1932 - captaining the team in 1931.

One of Bushell's passions and talents was skiing: in the early 1930s he was declared the fastest Briton in the male downhill category. He even had a black run named after him in St. Moritz, Switzerland, in recognition of the fact that he had set the fastest time for the run. He also won the slalom event of the annual Oxford-Cambridge ski race in 1931.

At an event in Canada, Bushell had an accident in which one of his skis narrowly missed his left eye, leaving him with a gash in the corner of it. Although he recovered from this accident, he still had a dark drooping in his left eye as a result of scarring from his stitches.

Bushell became fluent in French and German, with a good accent, which became extremely useful during his time as a prisoner of war.

Despite his sporting prospects, one of Bushell's primary wishes was to fly, and in 1932 he joined 601 Squadron Auxiliary Air Force, which was often referred to as "The Millionaires' Mob" because of the number of wealthy young men who paid their way solely to learn how to fly during training days (often at weekends).

Although Bushell was pursuing a career with the RAF he wasn't hampered in his attempts to become a barrister-at-Law, of Lincolns Inn, London.[2] From the outset of his legal career many commented on his ability as a lawyer, particularly in criminal defence. After a while, Bushell was appointed to military cases in prosecuting RAF personnel charged with various offences. These often involved pilots charged with dangerous flying. In October 1939, acting as assistant to Sir Patrick Hastings, he successfully defended two RAF pilots, John Freeborn and Paddy Byrne, court martialled after the friendly fire incident known as the Battle of Barking Creek. Byrne would later be incarcerated with Bushell at Stalag Luft III.

Bushell was given command of 92 Squadron in October 1939, and his promotion to squadron leader was confirmed on 1 January 1940.

During the squadron's first engagement with enemy aircraft on 23 May 1940, whilst on a patrol near Calais, Bushell was credited with damaging two Messerschmitt Bf 110 fighter aircraft of ZG 26 before being shot down himself, probably by future ace Oberleutnant Günther Specht. He crash-landed his Spitfire on German occupied ground and was captured before he had a chance to hide.

He became a POW and was sent to the Dulag luft transit camp near Frankfurt with all other captured aircrew.
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Old 10-11-2013, 06:35 AM
  #8887
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Roger Bushell (aka "Big X" in real life as well as the movie) it is.

An interesting footnote to the Stalag Luft III story. The camp was in eastern Germany (now part of Poland), and as the war drew to a close both the prisoners and the guards wanted to end up in the hands of the British, French, or Americans rather than the Russians. In the winter of 1945 they headed west, mostly on foot. By that time, able-bodied German soldiers were needed for front-line duty, leaving elderly, sick, and very young troops to serve as guards. So, on the march west, some of the prisoners, who were more fit than the guards, carried the guards' rifles for them. At that point, escape would have been both pointless and, in the German winter without decent clothing, dangerous. They made it to the vicinity of Munich and avoided being captured by the Russians.

Alas, nobody who escaped from Stalag Luft III stole a motorcycle, but it sure made the movie fun. The American prisoners were kept in a separate section of the camp and none of them escaped. The three escapees who got out of Germany were a Dutchman and two Norwegians.

Your turn, Ernie.
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Old 10-11-2013, 07:02 AM
  #8888
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Top_Gunn View Post
Roger Bushell (aka "Big X" in real life as well as the movie) it is.

An interesting footnote to the Stalag Luft III story. The camp was in eastern Germany (now part of Poland), and as the war drew to a close both the prisoners and the guards wanted to end up in the hands of the British, French, or Americans rather than the Russians. In the winter of 1945 they headed west, mostly on foot. By that time, able-bodied German soldiers were needed for front-line duty, leaving elderly, sick, and very young troops to serve as guards. So, on the march west, some of the prisoners, who were more fit than the guards, carried the guards' rifles for them. At that point, escape would have been both pointless and, in the German winter without decent clothing, dangerous. They made it to the vicinity of Munich and avoided being captured by the Russians.

Alas, nobody who escaped from Stalag Luft III stole a motorcycle, but it sure made the movie fun. The American prisoners were kept in a separate section of the camp and none of them escaped. The three escapees who got out of Germany were a Dutchman and two Norwegians.

Your turn, Ernie.
Thank you, Sir. I'll be back with a question shortly. The mental picture of prisoners carrying rifles for their guards is an intrigueing one, for sure. Thanks; Ernie P.
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Old 10-11-2013, 08:23 AM
  #8889
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Okay, guys; I'm going to give you a lot of clues to my next question, in a short period of time. I hope you find it interesting. I did. While hardly typical, this pilot’s exploits could furnish ample material for a dozen movies. He had more close escapes and adventures than any ten pilots should have, and apparently had more lives than a lucky cat. Good luck and enjoy the reading. Thanks; Ernie P.



Question: What warbird pilot do I describe?

Clues:

(1) In four months he destroyed 17 enemy planes.
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Old 10-11-2013, 10:02 AM
  #8890
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Lutz-Wilhelm Burckhardt
... had some good luck and shot down lots of Soviet planes in 1942 (too many for this, I think).
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Old 10-11-2013, 10:44 AM
  #8891
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Quote:
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Lutz-Wilhelm Burckhardt
... had some good luck and shot down lots of Soviet planes in 1942 (too many for this, I think).
Not a bad guess, perttime; but not Burckhardt, This may help. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What warbird pilot do I describe?

Clues:

(1) In four months he destroyed 17 enemy planes.

(2) He was shot down seven times.
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Old 10-11-2013, 11:01 AM
  #8892
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George Beurling??

Ken
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Old 10-11-2013, 12:30 PM
  #8893
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RCKen View Post
George Beurling??

Ken
No, not Beurling. But you've earned another clue, RCKen. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What warbird pilot do I describe?

Clues:

(1) In four months he destroyed 17 enemy planes.

(2) He was shot down seven times.

(3) He bailed out three times.
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Old 10-11-2013, 01:42 PM
  #8894
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Evening clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What warbird pilot do I describe?

Clues:

(1) In four months he destroyed 17 enemy planes.

(2) He was shot down seven times.

(3) He bailed out three times.

(4) He collided head on with an enemy aircraft.
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Old 10-11-2013, 03:45 PM
  #8895
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Bonus mid-evening clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What warbird pilot do I describe?

Clues:

(1) In four months he destroyed 17 enemy planes.

(2) He was shot down seven times.

(3) He bailed out three times.

(4) He collided head on with an enemy aircraft.

(5) His aircraft was cut in half by a collision with a friendly aircraft.
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Old 10-11-2013, 05:59 PM
  #8896
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And a late evening clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What warbird pilot do I describe?

Clues:

(1) In four months he destroyed 17 enemy planes.

(2) He was shot down seven times.

(3) He bailed out three times.

(4) He collided head on with an enemy aircraft.

(5) His aircraft was cut in half by a collision with a friendly aircraft.

(6) His aircraft was blown up by an enemy bomb, while he was sitting in it!
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Old 10-12-2013, 02:41 AM
  #8897
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Morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What warbird pilot do I describe?

Clues:

(1) In four months he destroyed 17 enemy planes.

(2) He was shot down seven times.

(3) He bailed out three times.

(4) He collided head on with an enemy aircraft.

(5) His aircraft was cut in half by a collision with a friendly aircraft.

(6) His aircraft was blown up by an enemy bomb, while he was sitting in it!

(7) Despite all that, he survived the war.
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Old 10-12-2013, 11:28 AM
  #8898
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Afternoon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What warbird pilot do I describe?

Clues:

(1) In four months he destroyed 17 enemy planes.

(2) He was shot down seven times.

(3) He bailed out three times.

(4) He collided head on with an enemy aircraft.

(5) His aircraft was cut in half by a collision with a friendly aircraft.

(6) His aircraft was blown up by an enemy bomb, while he was sitting in it!

(7) Despite all that, he survived the war.

(8) In his first combat, he claimed two enemy aircraft destroyed and one probably destroyed.
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Old 10-12-2013, 11:28 AM
  #8899
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HELL, i would say that pilot was, without a doubt--a darned lucky one!!!!!
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Old 10-12-2013, 01:40 PM
  #8900
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alanc View Post
HELL, i would say that pilot was, without a doubt--a darned lucky one!!!!!
Indeed he was, Sir; although the details make even more fascinating reading. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What warbird pilot do I describe?

Clues:

(1) In four months he destroyed 17 enemy planes.

(2) He was shot down seven times.

(3) He bailed out three times.

(4) He collided head on with an enemy aircraft.

(5) His aircraft was cut in half by a collision with a friendly aircraft.

(6) His aircraft was blown up by an enemy bomb, while he was sitting in it!

(7) Despite all that, he survived the war.

(8) In his first combat, he claimed two enemy aircraft destroyed and one probably destroyed.

(9) His squadron lost so many pilots, so quickly, he wound up as the leader; although he was still a rather junior rank.
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