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  1. #9076
    RCU Forum Manager/Admin RCKen's Avatar
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    Who am I?
    1. I served my country proudly and is still one of my most proud moments in my life
    2. My actions resulted in a record being set.
    3. My aircraft was resposible for downing 2 enemy aircraft, and ME-109 and a FW-190
    4. I was recently reunited with the plane I was resonsible for during the war.
    5. While I was directly responsible for the record that was set, I was not the pilot of the aircraft.
    6. Because of my actions my plane never aborted because of mechanical reasons.
    7. The plane was recently returned to it's original name after being restored.
    8. I was crew chief for the plane in question.
    The take off is optional, but the landing is MANDATORY!!
    RCU Forum Manager
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  2. #9077
    RCU Forum Manager/Admin RCKen's Avatar
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    Who am I?
    1. I served my country proudly and is still one of my most proud moments in my life
    2. My actions resulted in a record being set.
    3. My aircraft was resposible for downing 2 enemy aircraft, and ME-109 and a FW-190
    4. I was recently reunited with the plane I was resonsible for during the war.
    5. While I was directly responsible for the record that was set, I was not the pilot of the aircraft.
    6. Because of my actions my plane never aborted because of mechanical reasons.
    7. The plane was recently returned to it's original name after being restored.
    8. I was crew chief for the plane in question.
    9. Click image for larger version. 

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    Ken
    The take off is optional, but the landing is MANDATORY!!
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  3. #9078

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    Quote Originally Posted by RCKen View Post
    Who am I?
    1. I served my country proudly and is still one of my most proud moments in my life
    2. My actions resulted in a record being set.
    3. My aircraft was resposible for downing 2 enemy aircraft, and ME-109 and a FW-190
    4. I was recently reunited with the plane I was resonsible for during the war.
    5. While I was directly responsible for the record that was set, I was not the pilot of the aircraft.
    6. Because of my actions my plane never aborted because of mechanical reasons.
    7. The plane was recently returned to it's original name after being restored.
    8. I was crew chief for the plane in question.
    9. Click image for larger version. 

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    Ken
    Does this mean you want some one to answer the question, or are you simply running out of clues? It is nice they were able to get together one last time. Thanks; Ernie P.

  4. #9079
    RCU Forum Manager/Admin RCKen's Avatar
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    Ernie,
    No, this is one of the last clues. I'm still hoping somebody can guess it.

    Ken
    The take off is optional, but the landing is MANDATORY!!
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  5. #9080

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    Quote Originally Posted by RCKen View Post
    Ernie,
    No, this is one of the last clues. I'm still hoping somebody can guess it.

    Ken
    If no one else guesses the correct answer, I'll take a shot. But I'll hang back until then; I don't want people to get too tired of me asking questions. Come to think of it, I also have a crew chief question I can use. Thanks; Ernie P.

  6. #9081

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    Quote Originally Posted by RCKen View Post
    Ernie,
    No, this is one of the last clues. I'm still hoping somebody can guess it.

    Ken
    All;

    Since no one else seems to have the answer: RCKen's friend is Pat Buzzeo. He was the crew chief of Captain Jesse Frey's P-51, Ain't Misbehavin' during the latter stages of WWII. I'll leave it to RCKen to give you the details about Pat. I've had the honor of being friends with some of the greatest generation, and mourn their passing. While there are still some around to honor, we should take advantage of the opportunity to learn about their lives and deeds. We shall not see their like again. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Ain’t Misbehavin’ P-51

    Capt. Jesse Frey

    Crew Chief Pat Buzzeo



    10/20/2010 - Reunion: P-51 “Ain’t MisBehavin”, Pilot and Crew Chief

    It was nearly sixty years ago when Jesse Frey slipped into the cockpit of "Ain't Misbehavin" to escort allied bombers over Germany and back to their base in Great Britain. As part of the 362nd Fighter Group, Lt. Frey scored two enemy kills on those long missions.



    On Saturday, October 23rd the Indiana native will see "Ain't Misbehavin'" again. The fully restored P-51 will be flown from Birmingham, Alabama to Indianapolis Executive Airport for the reunion. The event is being hosted by Montgomery Aviation, Inc. and the Indiana Wing of the Commemorative Air Force which is dedicated to preserving America's Warbirds and their stories.

  7. #9082
    RCU Forum Manager/Admin RCKen's Avatar
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    Ernie has it correct.

    http://warbirds-eaa.net/aint-misbeha...ly-strickland/

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gS6iFSZgOg4
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0UqKv0pvfco

    I'm going to try to get one of Pat's sons to come in and add more info.

    Ken
    The take off is optional, but the landing is MANDATORY!!
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  8. #9083

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    Quote Originally Posted by RCKen View Post
    Ernie has it correct.

    http://warbirds-eaa.net/aint-misbeha...ly-strickland/

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gS6iFSZgOg4
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0UqKv0pvfco

    I'm going to try to get one of Pat's sons to come in and add more info.

    Ken

    I'd like to hear more about Mr. Buzzeo. Since you opened the subject of crew chiefs, I'll continue. I've had this one in the hopper, and and I think it will be a good followup. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What warbird crew chief do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) This crew chief not only serviced his aircraft; he made it, and every other of its type, more effective in actual combat.

  9. #9084
    Moderator AMA 74894's Avatar
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    hey.. I know that guy....

    yup, that's the Pat Buzzeo that my late brother Mikey (aka MinnFlyer) wrote this father's day piece about:

    http://www.rcuniverse.com/magazine/a...rticle_id=1256

    Dad (or as we refer to him these days, 'Gramps') was awarded the Bronze Star for having his P-51 Complete 100 Combat missions without ever having to return for a mechanical failure... (as is typical of guys from this era, ask Jessie about it, it was Pat's knowledge about the airplane... ask my Dad about it, 'Jessie has balls of steel and NEVER would have brought that airplane home without having had half a wing shot off')
    Jessie was a Trumpet player before the war, his band's theme song and Jessie's personal favorite was Ain't Misbehavin.

    Dad joined the service shortly after Dec7th 1941, and (fearful of being assigned flying bomber duties) told them he had claustrophobia... so they made him a crew chief instead.
    Ain't Misbehavin' was actually Dad's third P-51... his only 'D' model.
    the first two were 'B' models, Sebastian which was declared 'War Weary' and retired from Service in early 1943,
    and Sebastian Jr which was destroyed in an accident on takeoff in Italy in early 1944.
    (it was typical to take off in tandem... two airplanes in a lead / wingman formation... on a dirt runway.... being number 40 or so in line I wonder how in the heck they didn't destroy more airplanes like that... ) the Pilot lost visual orientation, ground looped and destroyed the airplane, fortunately he escaped uninjured.
    (imaging taking off a 1500 HP TAILDRAGGER... from a 1500 foot dirt strip... with an identical beast eight feet off your wingtip... just another day.)

    Both Jessie and My Dad Pat are both still alive, although both in their 90's. Gramps' health unfortunately is failing quickly.
    They are still one of the very few Pilot / Crew Chief pairs that are still alive.

    He taught me, both my Brothers (now both deceased) and literally hundreds of kids and adults the joy of RC flying...
    he's one heck of a guy and I know I had one heck of a childhood as a result.




    Click image for larger version. 

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    Jim Buzzeo AMA 74894
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  10. #9085
    RCU Forum Manager/Admin RCKen's Avatar
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    Thanks for filling in that info Jim. Your dad is one of the greatest individuals I've ever met and has as special place in my heart. That's why I wanted to dedicate this quiz to him as he deserves a good pat on the back!!!

    I still remember the trip up there to visit Mike and hearing your dad call out every pass that he made while flying!!!

    Ken
    The take off is optional, but the landing is MANDATORY!!
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  11. #9086
    Moderator AMA 74894's Avatar
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    Gramps was pretty doggone good with a Pattern Airplane too! Here's one last link to an older review here at rcu.. way back in 2011

    http://www.rcuniverse.com/magazine/a...rticle_id=1332

    at age 90, he could still wring out a Phoenix pretty doggone well. (he's flying in the video!)

    I apologize for hijacking the warbirds thread...

    I believe the floor belongs to Ernie P.
    Jim Buzzeo AMA 74894
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  12. #9087

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    Quote Originally Posted by AMA 74894 View Post

    Gramps was pretty doggone good with a Pattern Airplane too! Here's one last link to an older review here at rcu.. way back in 2011

    http://www.rcuniverse.com/magazine/a...rticle_id=1332

    at age 90, he could still wring out a Phoenix pretty doggone well. (he's flying in the video!)

    I apologize for hijacking the warbirds thread...

    I believe the floor belongs to Ernie P.
    You haven't hijacked anything, AMA 74894; that's what this is all about: To inform and teach all of us. And this was definitely one question well worth the time and effort. And back to the current question; an afternoon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What warbird crew chief do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) This crew chief not only serviced his aircraft; he made it, and every other of its type, more effective in actual combat.

    (2) His work earned him a bronze star. The citation was signed by a Famous General, one in his chain of command.

  13. #9088

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    Evening clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What warbird crew chief do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) This crew chief not only serviced his aircraft; he made it, and every other of its type, more effective in actual combat.

    (2) His work earned him a bronxe star. The citation was signed by a Famous General, one in his chain of command.

    (3) His name is proudly listed on a current website dedicated to the exploits of his unit.

  14. #9089

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    Morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What warbird crew chief do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) This crew chief not only serviced his aircraft; he made it, and every other of its type, more effective in actual combat.

    (2) His work earned him a bronze star. The citation was signed by a Famous General, one in his chain of command.

    (3) His name is proudly listed on a current website dedicated to the exploits of his unit.

    (4) He was considered to be an example of industriousness and maturity. He had a knack of being able to make/build/modify/fit almost any part he needed. And, he was considered to be very good at “appropriating” the parts and materials he needed.

  15. #9090
    Moderator AMA 74894's Avatar
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    I think I may know this one....
    Jim Buzzeo AMA 74894
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  16. #9091

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    Quote Originally Posted by AMA 74894 View Post
    I think I may know this one....
    I know of no reason you shouldn't jump in, AMA 74894. Feel free to take a shot. Given your circle of friends, you may well know the answer. And here's an afternoon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What warbird crew chief do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) This crew chief not only serviced his aircraft; he made it, and every other of its type, more effective in actual combat.

    (2) His work earned him a bronze star. The citation was signed by a Famous General, one in his chain of command.

    (3) His name is proudly listed on a current website dedicated to the exploits of his unit.

    (4) He was considered to be an example of industriousness and maturity. He had a knack of being able to make/build/modify/fit almost any part he needed. And, he was considered to be very good at “appropriating” the parts and materials he needed.

    (5) He was already in the Army when the U.S. entered the war. Although, he almost spent the war as an artilleryman.

  17. #9092
    Moderator AMA 74894's Avatar
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    Ok, I think clue #5 negates what I was thinking, but I'll give it a go...
    is it Chuck Yeager's Crew Chief, Jack Russell?
    Jim Buzzeo AMA 74894
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  18. #9093

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    Quote Originally Posted by AMA 74894 View Post
    Ok, I think clue #5 negates what I was thinking, but I'll give it a go...
    is it Chuck Yeager's Crew Chief, Jack Russell?
    No; but feel free to try again. And here's another clue to aid your search. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What warbird crew chief do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) This crew chief not only serviced his aircraft; he made it, and every other of its type, more effective in actual combat.

    (2) His work earned him a bronze star. The citation was signed by a Famous General, one in his chain of command.

    (3) His name is proudly listed on a current website dedicated to the exploits of his unit.

    (4) He was considered to be an example of industriousness and maturity. He had a knack of being able to make/build/modify/fit almost any part he needed. And, he was considered to be very good at “appropriating” the parts and materials he needed.

    (5) He was already in the Army when the U.S. entered the war. Although, he almost spent the war as an artilleryman.

    (6) While stationed abroad, he convinced his commander to transfer him to an air unit.

  19. #9094

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    Morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What warbird crew chief do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) This crew chief not only serviced his aircraft; he made it, and every other of its type, more effective in actual combat.

    (2) His work earned him a bronze star. The citation was signed by a famous General, one in his chain of command.

    (3) His name is proudly listed on a current website dedicated to the exploits of his unit.

    (4) He was considered to be an example of industriousness and maturity. He had a knack of being able to make/build/modify/fit almost any part he needed. And, he was considered to be very good at “appropriating” the parts and materials he needed.

    (5) He was already in the Army when the U.S. entered the war. Although, he almost spent the war as an artilleryman.

    (6) While stationed abroad, he convinced his commander to transfer him to an air unit.

    (7) After completing his overseas tour in early 1943, he was sent to become one of the first airmen assigned to a new unit; one which would later be dedicated to ground support activities.

  20. #9095

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    Afternoon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What warbird crew chief do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) This crew chief not only serviced his aircraft; he made it, and every other of its type, more effective in actual combat.

    (2) His work earned him a bronze star. The citation was signed by a famous General, one in his chain of command.

    (3) His name is proudly listed on a current website dedicated to the exploits of his unit.

    (4) He was considered to be an example of industriousness and maturity. He had a knack of being able to make/build/modify/fit almost any part he needed. And, he was considered to be very good at “appropriating” the parts and materials he needed.

    (5) He was already in the Army when the U.S. entered the war. Although, he almost spent the war as an artilleryman.

    (6) While stationed abroad, he convinced his commander to transfer him to an air unit.

    (7) After completing his overseas tour in early 1943, he was sent to become one of the first airmen assigned to a new unit; one which would later be dedicated to ground support activities.

    (8) He quickly showed a perhaps unique ability to devise and improvise a series of new or modified tools and equipment used in loading explosives aboard the aircraft he serviced.

  21. #9096

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    Evening clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What warbird crew chief do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) This crew chief not only serviced his aircraft; he made it, and every other of its type, more effective in actual combat.

    (2) His work earned him a bronze star. The citation was signed by a famous General, one in his chain of command.

    (3) His name is proudly listed on a current website dedicated to the exploits of his unit.

    (4) He was considered to be an example of industriousness and maturity. He had a knack of being able to make/build/modify/fit almost any part he needed. And, he was considered to be very good at “appropriating” the parts and materials he needed.

    (5) He was already in the Army when the U.S. entered the war. Although, he almost spent the war as an artilleryman.

    (6) While stationed abroad, he convinced his commander to transfer him to an air unit.

    (7) After completing his overseas tour in early 1943, he was sent to become one of the first airmen assigned to a new unit; one which would later be dedicated to ground support activities.

    (8) He quickly showed a perhaps unique ability to devise and improvise a series of new or modified tools and equipment used in loading explosives aboard the aircraft he serviced.

    (9) He developed a specially modified truck to help load the bombs aboard the aircraft. He also was an expert at the electrical wiring system carried inside the wings. He and his sidekick kept devising new ways to load both bombs and bullets aboard the aircraft.

  22. #9097

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    And a morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What warbird crew chief do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) This crew chief not only serviced his aircraft; he made it, and every other of its type, more effective in actual combat.

    (2) His work earned him a bronze star. The citation was signed by a famous General, one in his chain of command.

    (3) His name is proudly listed on a current website dedicated to the exploits of his unit.

    (4) He was considered to be an example of industriousness and maturity. He had a knack of being able to make/build/modify/fit almost any part he needed. And, he was considered to be very good at “appropriating” the parts and materials he needed.

    (5) He was already in the Army when the U.S. entered the war. Although, he almost spent the war as an artilleryman.

    (6) While stationed abroad, he convinced his commander to transfer him to an air unit.

    (7) After completing his overseas tour in early 1943, he was sent to become one of the first airmen assigned to a new unit; one which would later be dedicated to ground support activities.

    (8) He quickly showed a perhaps unique ability to devise and improvise a series of new or modified tools and equipment used in loading explosives aboard the aircraft he serviced.

    (9) He developed a specially modified truck to help load the bombs aboard the aircraft. He also was an expert at the electrical wiring system carried inside the wings. He and his sidekick kept devising new ways to load both bombs and bullets aboard the aircraft.

    (10) At that time, the unit was having a lot of problems carrying out dive bombing activities. This was discovered while the outfit was practicing dive bombing prior to the D-Day landings.

  23. #9098

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    Afternoon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What warbird crew chief do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) This crew chief not only serviced his aircraft; he made it, and every other of its type, more effective in actual combat.

    (2) His work earned him a bronze star. The citation was signed by a famous General, one in his chain of command.

    (3) His name is proudly listed on a current website dedicated to the exploits of his unit.

    (4) He was considered to be an example of industriousness and maturity. He had a knack of being able to make/build/modify/fit almost any part he needed. And, he was considered to be very good at “appropriating” the parts and materials he needed.

    (5) He was already in the Army when the U.S. entered the war. Although, he almost spent the war as an artilleryman.

    (6) While stationed abroad, he convinced his commander to transfer him to an air unit.

    (7) After completing his overseas tour in early 1943, he was sent to become one of the first airmen assigned to a new unit; one which would later be dedicated to ground support activities.

    (8) He quickly showed a perhaps unique ability to devise and improvise a series of new or modified tools and equipment used in loading explosives aboard the aircraft he serviced.

    (9) He developed a specially modified truck to help load the bombs aboard the aircraft. He also was an expert at the electrical wiring system carried inside the wings. He and his sidekick kept devising new ways to load both bombs and bullets aboard the aircraft.

    (10) At that time, the unit was having a lot of problems carrying out dive bombing activities. This was discovered while the outfit was practicing dive bombing prior to the D-Day landings.

    (11) The subject of our discussion realized the basic problem was that the pilots simply had too many things to do at the same time. The bomb release mechanism in use required the pilot to look down and take one hand away from the throttle or stick to release the bombs.

  24. #9099

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    Evening clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What warbird crew chief do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) This crew chief not only serviced his aircraft; he made it, and every other of its type, more effective in actual combat.

    (2) His work earned him a bronze star. The citation was signed by a famous General, one in his chain of command.

    (3) His name is proudly listed on a current website dedicated to the exploits of his unit.

    (4) He was considered to be an example of industriousness and maturity. He had a knack of being able to make/build/modify/fit almost any part he needed. And, he was considered to be very good at “appropriating” the parts and materials he needed.

    (5) He was already in the Army when the U.S. entered the war. Although, he almost spent the war as an artilleryman.

    (6) While stationed abroad, he convinced his commander to transfer him to an air unit.

    (7) After completing his overseas tour in early 1943, he was sent to become one of the first airmen assigned to a new unit; one which would later be dedicated to ground support activities.

    (8) He quickly showed a perhaps unique ability to devise and improvise a series of new or modified tools and equipment used in loading explosives aboard the aircraft he serviced.

    (9) He developed a specially modified truck to help load the bombs aboard the aircraft. He also was an expert at the electrical wiring system carried inside the wings. He and his sidekick kept devising new ways to load both bombs and bullets aboard the aircraft.

    (10) At that time, the unit was having a lot of problems carrying out dive bombing activities. This was discovered while the outfit was practicing dive bombing prior to the D-Day landings.

    (11) The subject of our discussion realized the basic problem was that the pilots simply had too many things to do at the same time. The bomb release mechanism in use required the pilot to look down and take one hand away from the throttle or stick to release the bombs.

    (12) He modified another existing bomb release mechanism, an electrical rather than mechanical system, to allow the pilot to “pickle” the bombs with a button mounted on the top of the control stick. This reduced the number of things the pilot had to simultaneously accomplish while keeping station in a steep dive.

  25. #9100

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    Morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What warbird crew chief do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) This crew chief not only serviced his aircraft; he made it, and every other of its type, more effective in actual combat.

    (2) His work earned him a bronze star. The citation was signed by a famous General, one in his chain of command.

    (3) His name is proudly listed on a current website dedicated to the exploits of his unit.

    (4) He was considered to be an example of industriousness and maturity. He had a knack of being able to make/build/modify/fit almost any part he needed. And, he was considered to be very good at “appropriating” the parts and materials he needed.

    (5) He was already in the Army when the U.S. entered the war. Although, he almost spent the war as an artilleryman.

    (6) While stationed abroad, he convinced his commander to transfer him to an air unit.

    (7) After completing his overseas tour in early 1943, he was sent to become one of the first airmen assigned to a new unit; one which would later be dedicated to ground support activities.

    (8) He quickly showed a perhaps unique ability to devise and improvise a series of new or modified tools and equipment used in loading explosives aboard the aircraft he serviced.

    (9) He developed a specially modified truck to help load the bombs aboard the aircraft. He also was an expert at the electrical wiring system carried inside the wings. He and his sidekick kept devising new ways to load both bombs and bullets aboard the aircraft.

    (10) At that time, the unit was having a lot of problems carrying out dive bombing activities. This was discovered while the outfit was practicing dive bombing prior to the D-Day landings.

    (11) The subject of our discussion realized the basic problem was that the pilots simply had too many things to do at the same time. The bomb release mechanism in use required the pilot to look down and take one hand away from the throttle or stick to release the bombs.

    (12) He modified another existing bomb release mechanism, an electrical rather than mechanical system, to allow the pilot to “pickle” the bombs with a button mounted on the top of the control stick. This reduced the number of things the pilot had to simultaneously accomplish while keeping station in a steep dive.

    (13) The system was tested for three months. All of the pilots involved said the new system (the forerunner of today’s HOTAS (hands on throttle and stick) system) saved time, money and hassle. In addition, the accuracy of their dive bombing improved exponentially.


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