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  1. #9101

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    Afternoon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What warbird crew chief do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) This crew chief not only serviced his aircraft; he made it, and every other of its type, more effective in actual combat.

    (2) His work earned him a bronze star. The citation was signed by a famous General, one in his chain of command.

    (3) His name is proudly listed on a current website dedicated to the exploits of his unit.

    (4) He was considered to be an example of industriousness and maturity. He had a knack of being able to make/build/modify/fit almost any part he needed. And, he was considered to be very good at “appropriating” the parts and materials he needed.

    (5) He was already in the Army when the U.S. entered the war. Although, he almost spent the war as an artilleryman.

    (6) While stationed abroad, he convinced his commander to transfer him to an air unit.

    (7) After completing his overseas tour in early 1943, he was sent to become one of the first airmen assigned to a new unit; one which would later be dedicated to ground support activities.

    (8) He quickly showed a perhaps unique ability to devise and improvise a series of new or modified tools and equipment used in loading explosives aboard the aircraft he serviced.

    (9) He developed a specially modified truck to help load the bombs aboard the aircraft. He also was an expert at the electrical wiring system carried inside the wings. He and his sidekick kept devising new ways to load both bombs and bullets aboard the aircraft.

    (10) At that time, the unit was having a lot of problems carrying out dive bombing activities. This was discovered while the outfit was practicing dive bombing prior to the D-Day landings.

    (11) The subject of our discussion realized the basic problem was that the pilots simply had too many things to do at the same time. The bomb release mechanism in use required the pilot to look down and take one hand away from the throttle or stick to release the bombs.

    (12) He modified another existing bomb release mechanism, an electrical rather than mechanical system, to allow the pilot to “pickle” the bombs with a button mounted on the top of the control stick. This reduced the number of things the pilot had to simultaneously accomplish while keeping station in a steep dive.

    (13) The system was tested for three months. All of the pilots involved said the new system (the forerunner of today’s HOTAS (hands on throttle and stick) system) saved time, money and hassle. In addition, the accuracy of their dive bombing improved exponentially.

    (14) The commanding general ordered all units to send armaments officers and electricians to our subject’s location to learn how to fit and use the new release system. The new system was used for the rest of WWII. Our subject’s contribution to the war effort was enough to earn him a bronze star.

  2. #9102

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  3. #9103

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyS View Post

    On the money, JohnnyS; and you are up. Piantino's contribution made a big difference to the Hell Hawks and the Allied fighter bombing campaign against the German Army. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What warbird crew chief do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) This crew chief not only serviced his aircraft; he made it, and every other of its type, more effective in actual combat.

    (2) His work earned him a bronze star. The citation was signed by a famous General, one in his chain of command.

    (3) His name is proudly listed on a current website dedicated to the exploits of his unit.

    (4) He was considered to be an example of industriousness and maturity. He had a knack of being able to make/build/modify/fit almost any part he needed. And, he was considered to be very good at “appropriating” the parts and materials he needed.

    (5) He was already in the Army when the U.S. entered the war. Although, he almost spent the war as an artilleryman.

    (6) While stationed abroad, he convinced his commander to transfer him to an air unit.

    (7) After completing his overseas tour in early 1943, he was sent to become one of the first airmen assigned to a new unit; one which would later be dedicated to ground support activities.

    (8) He quickly showed a perhaps unique ability to devise and improvise a series of new or modified tools and equipment used in loading explosives aboard the aircraft he serviced.

    (9) He developed a specially modified truck to help load the bombs aboard the aircraft. He also was an expert at the electrical wiring system carried inside the wings. He and his sidekick kept devising new ways to load both bombs and bullets aboard the aircraft.

    (10) At that time, the unit was having a lot of problems carrying out dive bombing activities. This was discovered while the outfit was practicing dive bombing prior to the D-Day landings.

    (11) The subject of our discussion realized the basic problem was that the pilots simply had too many things to do at the same time. The bomb release mechanism in use required the pilot to look down and take one hand away from the throttle or stick to release the bombs.

    (12) He modified another existing bomb release mechanism, an electrical rather than mechanical system, to allow the pilot to “pickle” the bombs with a button mounted on the top of the control stick. This reduced the number of things the pilot had to simultaneously accomplish while keeping station in a steep dive.

    (13) The system was tested for three months. All of the pilots involved said the new system (the forerunner of today’s HOTAS (hands on throttle and stick) system) saved time, money and hassle. In addition, the accuracy of their dive bombing improved exponentially.

    (14) The commanding general ordered all units to send armaments officers and electricians to our subject’s location to learn how to fit and use the new release system. The new system was used for the rest of WWII. Our subject’s contribution to the war effort was enough to earn him a bronze star.

    (15) The aircraft he serviced were P-47’s.

    (16) The unit was part of the 9th Air Force.

    (17) The unit flew overhead at D-Day and all the way across Europe and into Germany. And our subject was there all the way.

    (17) The unit was called “The Hell Hawks”.

    Answer: Sgt. Joseph “Pete” Piantino


    Joseph Piantino

    Wassaic, NY - Joseph Piantino, 94, a longtime resident of Wassaic, NY died on Saturday, March 30, 2013 at his home in Wassaic, NY. Mr. Piantino worked as a licensed Aircraft Mechanic and later worked as a mechanic and welder for the Local # 15 Operating Engineers in New York City.

    Born on March 30, 1919 in New York City he was the son of the late Quinto and Margaret (Damroth) Piantino. On October 2, 1952 in New York City he married Gwendoline Andrews who survives at home. Mr. Piantino proudly served in the United States Amy and Air Force during WWII and the Korean Conflict and was a recipient of the Bronze Star. He was also a member of the VFW Post #5444 in Dover Plains, NY and the Millerton American Legion Post# 178 in Millerton, NY.

    In addition to his wife, he is survived by his son, Preston E. Piantino and his wife, Betty Jane, of Havertown, PA; Preston's former wives, JoAnne Piantino and Marie Piantino; three grandchildren, David, Scott and Heather Piantino and one great-granddaughter, Isabelle Piantino. Besides his parents, he was predeceased by two brothers, Louis and George Piantino and two sisters, Edna Doherty and Mary Silvestry.

    Funeral services will be private. Memorial contributions may be made to theSt. Jude Children's Research Hospital , 501 St Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105 or the VFW National Home for Children, 3573 S. Waverly Rd., Eaton Rapids, MI 48827. To send the family an online condolence or to light a memorial candle, please visit Mr. Piantino's Book of Memories at www.hufcutfuneralhome.com

  4. #9104

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    That was a tough one.

    OK, here goes:

    1. The nickname of this aircraft served as the inspiration for the name of a film studio in another country.

    2. Used by three countries, 2 in Europe and one in the Americas.

  5. #9105

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyS View Post
    That was a tough one.

    OK, here goes:

    1. The nickname of this aircraft served as the inspiration for the name of a film studio in another country.

    2. Used by three countries, 2 in Europe and one in the Americas.
    Just a hunch, but I don't think this will go very long. They made some really good movies, though. Thanks; Ernie P.

  6. #9106

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyS View Post
    That was a tough one.

    OK, here goes:

    1. The nickname of this aircraft served as the inspiration for the name of a film studio in another country.

    2. Used by three countries, 2 in Europe and one in the Americas.

    How about the P-36 Hawk; and Hawk Films? Although, I do think the P-36 was used by more than two European countries. Thanks; Ernie P.


    The Curtiss P-36 Hawk also known as the Curtiss Hawk Model 75, was an American-designed and built fighter aircraft of the 1930s and 40s. A contemporary of both the Hawker Hurricane and Messerschmitt Bf 109, it was one of the first of a new generation of combat aircraft—a sleek monoplane design making extensive use of metal in its construction and powered by a powerful radial engine. Obsolete at the onset of World War II and best known as the predecessor of the Curtiss P-40 Warhawk, the P-36 saw only limited combat with the United States Army Air Forces.

    The P-36 was used more extensively by the French Air Force, both during the Battle of France and by the Vichy French; and was used against French forces in the Franco-Thai War (October 1940–9 May 1941.) It was also used by the British Commonwealth (where it was known as the Mohawk), and by Chinese air units. Several dozen also fought in the Finnish Air Force against the Soviet Air Forces. With around 1,000 aircraft built, the P-36 was a major commercial success for Curtiss. This article also covers the YP-37 and the XP-42 prototypes based on the P-36.


    Hawk Films was a British film production company formed by Stanley Kubrick for his 1964 film Dr. Strangelove. He also used it as production company for A Clockwork Orange (1971), Barry Lyndon (1975), and The Shining (1980).

    He later formed two subsidiaries that were also named after birds of prey: In addition to Hawk Films, Peregrine Productions was involved in the production of Barry Lyndon and The Shining; while Harrier Films was involved in the production of Full Metal Jacket (1987) together with his main production company Stanley Kubrick Productions, which he set up for 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) and which was also the main production company for Eyes Wide Shut (1999).

    Noted American environmentalist Roger A. Caras served as vice president of Hawk Films from 1965 to 1969, and was heavily involved in the promotion of 2001: A Space Odyssey.

  7. #9107

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyS View Post
    That was a tough one.

    OK, here goes:

    1. The nickname of this aircraft served as the inspiration for the name of a film studio in another country.

    2. Used by three countries, 2 in Europe and one in the Americas.

    How about the P-36 Hawk; and Hawk Films? Although, I do think the P-36 was used by more than two European countries. Thanks; Ernie P.


    The Curtiss P-36 Hawk also known as the Curtiss Hawk Model 75, was an American-designed and built fighter aircraft of the 1930s and 40s. A contemporary of both the Hawker Hurricane and Messerschmitt Bf 109, it was one of the first of a new generation of combat aircraft—a sleek monoplane design making extensive use of metal in its construction and powered by a powerful radial engine. Obsolete at the onset of World War II and best known as the predecessor of the Curtiss P-40 Warhawk, the P-36 saw only limited combat with the United States Army Air Forces.

    The P-36 was used more extensively by the French Air Force, both during the Battle of France and by the Vichy French; and was used against French forces in the Franco-Thai War (October 1940–9 May 1941.) It was also used by the British Commonwealth (where it was known as the Mohawk), and by Chinese air units. Several dozen also fought in the Finnish Air Force against the Soviet Air Forces. With around 1,000 aircraft built, the P-36 was a major commercial success for Curtiss. This article also covers the YP-37 and the XP-42 prototypes based on the P-36.


    Hawk Films was a British film production company formed by Stanley Kubrick for his 1964 film Dr. Strangelove. He also used it as production company for A Clockwork Orange (1971), Barry Lyndon (1975), and The Shining (1980).

    He later formed two subsidiaries that were also named after birds of prey: In addition to Hawk Films, Peregrine Productions was involved in the production of Barry Lyndon and The Shining; while Harrier Films was involved in the production of Full Metal Jacket (1987) together with his main production company Stanley Kubrick Productions, which he set up for 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) and which was also the main production company for Eyes Wide Shut (1999).

    Noted American environmentalist Roger A. Caras served as vice president of Hawk Films from 1965 to 1969, and was heavily involved in the promotion of 2001: A Space Odyssey.

  8. #9108

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    Ernie,

    No, not it. Sorry!

    New clue:

    1. The nickname of this aircraft served as the inspiration for the name of a film studio in another country.

    2. Used by three countries, 2 in Europe and one in the Americas.

    3. It was a low wing monoplane, with 2 engines.

  9. #9109

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyS View Post
    Ernie,

    No, not it. Sorry!

    New clue:

    1. The nickname of this aircraft served as the inspiration for the name of a film studio in another country.

    2. Used by three countries, 2 in Europe and one in the Americas.

    3. It was a low wing monoplane, with 2 engines.
    And once again I am amazed at how many seemingly correct answers there are for any of our questions. Okay... Not the Hawk. Hmmm...... Thanks; Ernie P.

  10. #9110

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    New clue, and a correction:

    1. The nickname of this aircraft served as the inspiration for the name of a film studio in another country.

    2. Used by three countries, 2 in Europe and one in the Americas. (Note that some references include another south american country, but these references are incomplete.)

    3. It was a low wing monoplane, with 2 engines.

    4. The engines were 6 cylinder inline engines (i-6), not vee-type.

  11. #9111

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyS View Post
    New clue, and a correction:

    1. The nickname of this aircraft served as the inspiration for the name of a film studio in another country.

    2. Used by three countries, 2 in Europe and one in the Americas. (Note that some references include another south american country, but these references are incomplete.)

    3. It was a low wing monoplane, with 2 engines.

    4. The engines were 6 cylinder inline engines (i-6), not vee-type.

    JohnnyS; have we lost you? If not, it's past time for another clue. Thanks; Ernie P.

  12. #9112

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    OK, ONE more clue. Then we must have some guesses before any more clues!

    New clue:

    1. The nickname of this aircraft served as the inspiration for the name of a film studio in another country.

    2. Used by three countries, 2 in Europe and one in the Americas. (Note that some references include another south american country, but these references are incomplete.)

    3. It was a low wing monoplane, with 2 engines.

    4. The engines were 6 cylinder inline engines (i-6), not vee-type.

    5. It was originally designed with the intention to serve as a reconnaissance and ground-attack aircraft.

  13. #9113
    Moderator AMA 74894's Avatar
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    Ca.309 Ghibli
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  14. #9114

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    And we have a WINNER!!!

    Jim, you're up.

  15. #9115
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    Ok, here's one that will likely be easy for you guys...
    1) My company was originally an aircraft manufacturer before becoming a pioneer in this field.
    2) The company's first civilian airplane flew in 1935.
    3) Their first military design flew in 1938.
    Jim Buzzeo AMA 74894
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  16. #9116
    Moderator AMA 74894's Avatar
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    Ok, Hump Day New Clues...
    1) My company was originally an aircraft manufacturer before becoming a pioneer in this field.
    2) The company's first civilian airplane flew in 1935.
    3) Their first military design flew in 1938.
    4) Although many military aircraft are equipped with at least one of me, almost no civilian aircraft are.
    Jim Buzzeo AMA 74894
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  17. #9117
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    Martin-Baker.
    Gary-Waco Brother#171 If the build gets tough, always refrain from throwing things! ARCA, Austin Tx. www.austinrc.org

  18. #9118
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    BAM!
    WINNER!
    the rest of the clues:
    1) My company was originally an aircraft manufacturer before becoming a pioneer in this field.
    2) The company's first civilian airplane flew in 1935.
    3) Their first military design flew in 1938.
    4) Although many military aircraft are equipped with me, almost no civilian aircraft are.
    5) One of the Co-founders of my company was killed in an aircraft test flight in 1942.
    6) After the Co-founder’s Death, the primary focus of my company switched from aircraft manufacturing to manufacturing little ol’ ME.
    7) Although my primary purpose is to save lives, I've taken more than a few.
    8) I am designed as a single use item. Once I’ve been activated the airframe itself typically does not ever fly again.


    redbiscuits, you're up
    Jim Buzzeo AMA 74894
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  19. #9119
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    This aircraft made its first flight in the early half of 1958 and production lasted for nearly 2 decades.
    Gary-Waco Brother#171 If the build gets tough, always refrain from throwing things! ARCA, Austin Tx. www.austinrc.org

  20. #9120
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    So what was the item in question that MB developed? The ejection seat?
    John F Howard (aka skylarkmk1)
    AMA 10955, WACO Brotherhood #26, AWC, NWC

  21. #9121
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    Quote Originally Posted by redbiscuits View Post
    This aircraft made its first flight in the early half of 1958 and production lasted for nearly 2 decades.
    McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom????

    Ken
    The take off is optional, but the landing is MANDATORY!!
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  22. #9122
    redbiscuits's Avatar
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    Ding, ding,ding
    winner!
    Gary-Waco Brother#171 If the build gets tough, always refrain from throwing things! ARCA, Austin Tx. www.austinrc.org

  23. #9123

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    Quote Originally Posted by redbiscuits View Post
    Ding, ding,ding
    winner!

    RCKen; I think you're up, Sir. Thanks; Ernie P.

  24. #9124
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    I'm sorry. I've been totally tied up with a work emergency. If you have a question loaded up go ahead and post it. Otherwise I should be able to get one tomorrow. Sorry for the delay


    Ken
    The take off is optional, but the landing is MANDATORY!!
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  25. #9125

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    Quote Originally Posted by RCKen View Post
    I'm sorry. I've been totally tied up with a work emergency. If you have a question loaded up go ahead and post it. Otherwise I should be able to get one tomorrow. Sorry for the delay


    Ken

    All;

    The floor is open. If no one posts by tomorrow night, I will post something. Thanks; Ernie P.


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