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  1. #9151
    RCU Forum Manager/Admin RCKen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ernie P. View Post
    Morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What airman do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) For most of his career, he labored in obscurity; just another service member.

    (2) He fought in two world wars.

    (3) He was present at one of the greatest naval battles in history.

    (4) He was in the RNAS.

    (5) And in the RAF.

    (6) He was an aircraft mechanic, and started out tending seaplanes.

    (7) He was the oldest ever surviving member of any of the British Armed Forces and one of the oldest surviving veterans of the First World War. He was the last survivor of the Battle of Jutland, the last surviving member of the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS) and the last surviving founding member of the Royal Air Force (RAF).

    Henry Allingham??

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  2. #9152

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    Quote Originally Posted by RCKen View Post

    Indeed, Sir; and you are up. Allingham was a long lived gentleman with a great outlook on life. Check out clue (10). Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What airman do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) For most of his career, he labored in obscurity; just another service member.

    (2) He fought in two world wars.

    (3) He was present at one of the greatest naval battles in history.

    (4) He was in the RNAS.

    (5) And in the RAF.

    (6) He was an aircraft mechanic, and started out tending seaplanes.

    (7) He was the oldest ever surviving member of any of the British Armed Forces and one of the oldest surviving veterans of the First World War. He was the last survivor of the Battle of Jutland, the last surviving member of the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS) and the last surviving founding member of the Royal Air Force (RAF).

    (8) He was, for a while, the oldest living person.

    (9) He also served on the Western Front during the Ypres offensive.

    (10) He credited "cigarettes, whisky and wild, wild women – and a good sense of humour" for his longevity.

    Answer: Henry William Allingham (6 June 1896 – 18 July 2009)

    Henry William Allingham (6 June 1896 – 18 July 2009) was a British supercentenarian, First World War veteran and, for one month, the verified oldest living man in the world. He is also the second-oldest military veteran ever and at the time of his death, he was the 12th-verified oldest man of all time.
    Allingham was the oldest ever surviving member of any of the British Armed Forces and one of the oldest surviving veterans of the First World War. He was the last survivor of the Battle of Jutland, the last surviving member of the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS) and the last surviving founding member of the Royal Air Force (RAF). In 2001 he became the face of the First World War veterans' association and made frequent public appearances to ensure that awareness of the sacrifices of the First World War was not lost to modern generations. He received many honours and awards for his First World War service and his longevity.

    Allingham wanted to join the war effort in August 1914 as a despatch rider, but his critically ill mother managed to persuade him to stay at home and look after her. However, after his mother died in 1915, aged 42, Allingham enlisted with the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS). He became formally rated as an Air Mechanic Second Class on 21 September 1915, and was posted to Chingford before completing his training at Sheerness, Kent. His RNAS serial number was RNAS F8317.

    After graduation, Allingham was posted to the RNAS Air Station at Great Yarmouth where he worked in aircraft maintenance. On 13 April 1916, King George V inspected the air station and its aircraft. Allingham later reported disappointment at barely missing an opportunity to speak with the king.

    Allingham also worked in Bacton, Norfolk, further up the coast, where night-flying was conducted and was later involved in supporting anti-submarine patrols. A typical patrol would last two or three days and would involve the manual labour of hoisting a seaplane in and out of the water by means of a deck-mounted derrick.

    During the preparations for what has become known as the Battle of Jutland, Allingham was ordered to join the naval trawler HMT Kingfisher. Onboard was a Sopwith Schneider seaplane that was used to patrol the surrounding waters for the German High Seas Fleet. Allingham's responsibilities included helping to launch this aircraft. Although the Kingfisher was not directly involved in the battle (it shadowed the British Grand Fleet and then the High Seas Fleet), Allingham still rightfully claimed to be the last known survivor of that battle and could recall "seeing shells ricocheting across the sea."

    In September 1917, Allingham, by then an Air Mechanic First Class, was posted to the Western Front to join No. 12 Squadron RNAS. This unit acted as a training squadron for other RNAS squadrons based on the Western Front. There is also some evidence that the squadron was involved in combat operations. When Allingham arrived at Petite-Synthe, both the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) and the RNAS were involved in the Ypres offensive. Allingham also instrumented the very first reconnaissance aircraft camera during the First World War. On 3 November 1917, he was posted to the aircraft depot at Dunkirk, France where he remained for the rest of the war, on aircraft repair and recovery duties. He recalls being bombed from the air and shelled from both the land and the sea.

    He transferred to the Royal Air Force when the RNAS and the RFC were merged on 1 April 1918. The creation of the Royal Air Force did not initially have a big impact on Allingham and he later remarked that at that time he still considered himself a navy man. In the RAF he was ranked as a Rigger Aero, Aircraft Mechanic Second Class and was given a new service number: 208317. Allingham returned to the Home Establishment in February 1919 and was formally discharged to the RAF Reserve on 16 April 1919. During the last few years of his life Allingham was recognized as the last surviving founding member of the RAF. Speaking with Dennis Goodwin of the First World War Veterans' Association, Allingham said, "It is a shock as well as a privilege to think that I am the only man alive from that original reorganisation when the RAF was formed."

    During the Second World War, Allingham was in a reserved occupation and worked on a number of projects. Perhaps his most significant contribution was the design of an effective counter-measure to the German magnetic mines. During his Christmas lunch in 1939 he was called away to help design a system that would neutralise the mines and open the port of Harwich, Essex. Nine days later, he had successfully completed the task.

  3. #9153

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    Quote Originally Posted by RCKen View Post

    Indeed, Sir; and you are up. Allingham was a long lived gentleman with a great outlook on life. Check out clue (10). Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What airman do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) For most of his career, he labored in obscurity; just another service member.

    (2) He fought in two world wars.

    (3) He was present at one of the greatest naval battles in history.

    (4) He was in the RNAS.

    (5) And in the RAF.

    (6) He was an aircraft mechanic, and started out tending seaplanes.

    (7) He was the oldest ever surviving member of any of the British Armed Forces and one of the oldest surviving veterans of the First World War. He was the last survivor of the Battle of Jutland, the last surviving member of the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS) and the last surviving founding member of the Royal Air Force (RAF).

    (8) He was, for a while, the oldest living person.

    (9) He also served on the Western Front during the Ypres offensive.

    (10) He credited "cigarettes, whisky and wild, wild women – and a good sense of humour" for his longevity.

    Answer: Henry William Allingham (6 June 1896 – 18 July 2009)

    Henry William Allingham (6 June 1896 – 18 July 2009) was a British supercentenarian, First World War veteran and, for one month, the verified oldest living man in the world. He is also the second-oldest military veteran ever and at the time of his death, he was the 12th-verified oldest man of all time.
    Allingham was the oldest ever surviving member of any of the British Armed Forces and one of the oldest surviving veterans of the First World War. He was the last survivor of the Battle of Jutland, the last surviving member of the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS) and the last surviving founding member of the Royal Air Force (RAF). In 2001 he became the face of the First World War veterans' association and made frequent public appearances to ensure that awareness of the sacrifices of the First World War was not lost to modern generations. He received many honours and awards for his First World War service and his longevity.

    Allingham wanted to join the war effort in August 1914 as a despatch rider, but his critically ill mother managed to persuade him to stay at home and look after her. However, after his mother died in 1915, aged 42, Allingham enlisted with the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS). He became formally rated as an Air Mechanic Second Class on 21 September 1915, and was posted to Chingford before completing his training at Sheerness, Kent. His RNAS serial number was RNAS F8317.

    After graduation, Allingham was posted to the RNAS Air Station at Great Yarmouth where he worked in aircraft maintenance. On 13 April 1916, King George V inspected the air station and its aircraft. Allingham later reported disappointment at barely missing an opportunity to speak with the king.

    Allingham also worked in Bacton, Norfolk, further up the coast, where night-flying was conducted and was later involved in supporting anti-submarine patrols. A typical patrol would last two or three days and would involve the manual labour of hoisting a seaplane in and out of the water by means of a deck-mounted derrick.

    During the preparations for what has become known as the Battle of Jutland, Allingham was ordered to join the naval trawler HMT Kingfisher. Onboard was a Sopwith Schneider seaplane that was used to patrol the surrounding waters for the German High Seas Fleet. Allingham's responsibilities included helping to launch this aircraft. Although the Kingfisher was not directly involved in the battle (it shadowed the British Grand Fleet and then the High Seas Fleet), Allingham still rightfully claimed to be the last known survivor of that battle and could recall "seeing shells ricocheting across the sea."

    In September 1917, Allingham, by then an Air Mechanic First Class, was posted to the Western Front to join No. 12 Squadron RNAS. This unit acted as a training squadron for other RNAS squadrons based on the Western Front. There is also some evidence that the squadron was involved in combat operations. When Allingham arrived at Petite-Synthe, both the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) and the RNAS were involved in the Ypres offensive. Allingham also instrumented the very first reconnaissance aircraft camera during the First World War. On 3 November 1917, he was posted to the aircraft depot at Dunkirk, France where he remained for the rest of the war, on aircraft repair and recovery duties. He recalls being bombed from the air and shelled from both the land and the sea.

    He transferred to the Royal Air Force when the RNAS and the RFC were merged on 1 April 1918. The creation of the Royal Air Force did not initially have a big impact on Allingham and he later remarked that at that time he still considered himself a navy man. In the RAF he was ranked as a Rigger Aero, Aircraft Mechanic Second Class and was given a new service number: 208317. Allingham returned to the Home Establishment in February 1919 and was formally discharged to the RAF Reserve on 16 April 1919. During the last few years of his life Allingham was recognized as the last surviving founding member of the RAF. Speaking with Dennis Goodwin of the First World War Veterans' Association, Allingham said, "It is a shock as well as a privilege to think that I am the only man alive from that original reorganisation when the RAF was formed."

    During the Second World War, Allingham was in a reserved occupation and worked on a number of projects. Perhaps his most significant contribution was the design of an effective counter-measure to the German magnetic mines. During his Christmas lunch in 1939 he was called away to help design a system that would neutralise the mines and open the port of Harwich, Essex. Nine days later, he had successfully completed the task.

  4. #9154

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    More info on Mr. Allingham. I'll be out of town for a few days; so you guys enjoy. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Allingham credited "cigarettes, whisky and wild, wild women – and a good sense of humour" for his longevity.

    Milestones
    6 June 1996 – 100th birthday
    20 July 2003 – Oldest verified living British man upon the death of Jack Davis
    6 June 2006 – 110th birthday
    10/11/2006 – Oldest living man in Europe following the death of Frenchman Maurice Floquet
    13 February 2007 – Second oldest person in Britain upon the death of Aida Mason
    01/11/2007 – Oldest ever member of any British armed forces, surpassing George Ives who died in 1993 aged 111 years and 146 days
    13 March 2008 – Oldest ever English man, surpassing John Mosely Turner who died in 1968 aged 111 years and 280 days
    29 March 2009 – Oldest ever British man, surpassing Welshman John Evans who died in 1990 aged 112 years and 295 days
    6 June 2009 – First British man to reach the age of 113
    19 June 2009 – Oldest living man in the world following the death of Japanese man Tomoji Tanabe
    18 July 2009 – Died aged 113 years 42 days, the second oldest man ever to die in Europe, behind only Joan Riudavets of Spain who died in 2004 aged 114 years and 81 days.

    Allingham was awarded four medals, two of which were medals from the First World War. The Gold Medal of Saint-Omer was awarded to Allingham on 11 September 2004 when he was given the Freedom of the Town of Saint-Omer. He was also awarded France's highest military honour, the Lιgion d'honneur, in which he was appointed a chevalier in 2003 and promoted to officier in 2009. The remaining two medals are British Campaign Medals from the First World War: the British War Medal and the Victory Medal; those two medals are colloquially known as "Mutt and Jeff". These two medals are replacement medals supplied by the Ministry of Defence after discovering at a recent cenotaph parade that Allingham's original campaign medals were destroyed during the Blitz of the Second World War.

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    More info on Mr. Allingham. I'll be out of town for a few days; so you guys enjoy. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Allingham credited "cigarettes, whisky and wild, wild women – and a good sense of humour" for his longevity.

    Milestones
    6 June 1996 – 100th birthday
    20 July 2003 – Oldest verified living British man upon the death of Jack Davis
    6 June 2006 – 110th birthday
    10/11/2006 – Oldest living man in Europe following the death of Frenchman Maurice Floquet
    13 February 2007 – Second oldest person in Britain upon the death of Aida Mason
    01/11/2007 – Oldest ever member of any British armed forces, surpassing George Ives who died in 1993 aged 111 years and 146 days
    13 March 2008 – Oldest ever English man, surpassing John Mosely Turner who died in 1968 aged 111 years and 280 days
    29 March 2009 – Oldest ever British man, surpassing Welshman John Evans who died in 1990 aged 112 years and 295 days
    6 June 2009 – First British man to reach the age of 113
    19 June 2009 – Oldest living man in the world following the death of Japanese man Tomoji Tanabe
    18 July 2009 – Died aged 113 years 42 days, the second oldest man ever to die in Europe, behind only Joan Riudavets of Spain who died in 2004 aged 114 years and 81 days.

    Allingham was awarded four medals, two of which were medals from the First World War. The Gold Medal of Saint-Omer was awarded to Allingham on 11 September 2004 when he was given the Freedom of the Town of Saint-Omer. He was also awarded France's highest military honour, the Lιgion d'honneur, in which he was appointed a chevalier in 2003 and promoted to officier in 2009. The remaining two medals are British Campaign Medals from the First World War: the British War Medal and the Victory Medal; those two medals are colloquially known as "Mutt and Jeff". These two medals are replacement medals supplied by the Ministry of Defence after discovering at a recent cenotaph parade that Allingham's original campaign medals were destroyed during the Blitz of the Second World War.

  6. #9156

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    I really don't know why my posts are resulting in doubles. I click "post quick reply" and sometimes the program asks me "Do you want to continue or cancel?" and no matter what I do, I get double posts. Sorry for the bother. Thanks; Ernie P.

  7. #9157
    RCU Forum Manager/Admin RCKen's Avatar
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    Here we go. I actually have a quiz ready this time!!!

    What warplane am I??


    1. First produced in 1936
    2. Designed with the Pacific operational area in mind
    The take off is optional, but the landing is MANDATORY!!
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    PBY-1
    Last edited by advanceandy; 12-29-2013 at 10:14 PM.

  9. #9159
    Moderator AMA 74894's Avatar
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    whoa my most humble apologies to all, Ken got it exactly right, it's been quite the 100 MPH week....
    Ken's got the floor, thanks all for the kind thoughts.
    Jim Buzzeo AMA 74894
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  10. #9160
    RCU Forum Manager/Admin RCKen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by advanceandy View Post
    PBY-1

    Well that didn't take long at all!!! You are correct.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Consolidated_PBY_Catalina

    What warplane am I??


    1. First produced in 1936
    2. Designed with the Pacific operational area in mind
    3. Even though they were slow and a bit "clumsy", they still produced an distinguished record during the war.
    4. Over 3,300 were built
    5. Saw use in civilian roles after the war in many different roles including commercial airline service as well.
    6. Was able to operate without any runways, which is actually it's main role.
    7. Wartime roles included Anti-submarine patrols, maritime patrols, night attack, and search and rescue.
    8. Twin engine.
    9. Played a huge role in the Battle of Midway
    10. Used by both US Navy and the Royal Navy
    The take off is optional, but the landing is MANDATORY!!
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  11. #9161

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    Quote Originally Posted by advanceandy View Post
    PBY-1
    All;

    If I'm reading things correctly, advanceandy has the floor and should ask the next question. He should have responded within 24 hours, but may not understand the rules. I'll ping him and see if he's ready. Otherwise, the floor will be open to whomever has a question ready. Thanks; Ernie P.

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    Ok Ernie, I'll bite.
    You guys have been stumping me lately, so this may be my only chance to ask a question!
    1. Twin engined monoplane.
    2. Basic airframe first flown in 1967.
    3. Developed to replace an aircraft first introduced in 1962.
    Thanks!
    Zip

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    Zip
    i'll take a crack at this one, is it the OV-10 Bronco that replaced the Skymaster?

    Mike
    Last edited by 70 ragtop; 01-05-2014 at 01:04 PM.

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    Good guess Mike, but not what I'm looking for....
    1. Twin engined monoplane.
    2. Basic airframe first flown in 1967.
    3. Developed to replace an aircraft first introduced in 1962.
    4. Airframe had a major upgrading in the mid 90's.
    Thanks!
    Zip

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    Beechcraft U-21 Ute aka Beechcraft King Air
    Last edited by advanceandy; 01-05-2014 at 07:10 PM. Reason: aka added

  16. #9166

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    Quote Originally Posted by zippome View Post
    Good guess Mike, but not what I'm looking for....
    1. Twin engined monoplane.
    2. Basic airframe first flown in 1967.
    3. Developed to replace an aircraft first introduced in 1962.
    4. Airframe had a major upgrading in the mid 90's.
    Thanks!
    Zip
    Ahh, thought I had that one, next thing that came to mind was the A6, but the dates don't work.

    Lets take another crack at it, its a long shot for a warbird, but the Boeing 737 fills the bill, first flight April 9 1967, and it did go thru many upgrades in the 90s, and the US Military and NASA fly the type

    Just curious, are the mystery persons/planes limited to US military, or wordwide?

    Thanks Mike

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    A couple more clues before bedtime.

    1. Twin engined monoplane.
    2. Basic airframe first flown in 1967.
    3. Developed to replace an aircraft first introduced in 1962.
    4. Airframe had a major upgrading in the mid 90's.
    5. The aircraft has both civilian and military versions.
    6. The Military version first took to the air in 2009.

    Thanks!
    Zip
    I was typing in the clues when 70's ragtop offered his answer. So very close. What is the warbird that I'm looking for?
    Last edited by zippome; 01-05-2014 at 08:09 PM.

  18. #9168

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    P8 Poseidon
    Last edited by 70 ragtop; 01-05-2014 at 08:45 PM.

  19. #9169

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    70'sragtop ,
    Right ballpark, different game.

    1. Twin engined monoplane.
    2. Basic airframe first flown in 1967.
    3. Developed to replace an aircraft first introduced in 1962.
    4. Airframe had a major upgrading in the mid 90's.
    5. The aircraft has both civilian and military versions.
    6. The Military version first took to the air in 2009.
    7. In service with one nation, another just took delivery of it's first aircraft last month.
    8. Both nations are retiring turboprop aircraft and replacing them with jets.


    Thanks!
    Zip

  20. #9170

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    Ahhhh , so close, but so far away! Well if it doesn't need to be US military, I'm thinking it the Boeing 737 AEW&C. US military, I'm thinking C-40

  21. #9171

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    Well, either I screwed up, or a glitch prevented me from seeing your first post about the P8 Poseidon. All I saw was the c40 answer, and that was what I responded to. So, 70'sragtop was correct with the P-8 Poseidon!
    Sorry about the mix up!
    70'sragtop , you have the floor!

  22. #9172

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    Quote Originally Posted by zippome View Post
    Well, either I screwed up, or a glitch prevented me from seeing your first post about the P8 Poseidon. All I saw was the c40 answer, and that was what I responded to. So, 70'sragtop was correct with the P-8 Poseidon!
    Sorry about the mix up!
    70'sragtop , you have the floor!
    Sorry Zip, that was me, I realized it was the P-8 right after I posted and tryed to edit before you read it..

    Hoping you could provide a little guidance. I saw GPete's rules, but as this is a few years old, and many pages long, I'm thinking the rules may have developed over time.

    So you provide three clues initially?
    Do you provide another clue each time someone guesses, or each day, or ??
    Limited to US military, or worldwide?
    Rotor, fixed wing, and military aviation personnel are all acceptable?
    Is there a era range?

    Thanks Mike
    Last edited by 70 ragtop; 01-06-2014 at 12:54 PM.
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  23. #9173
    RCU Forum Manager/Admin RCKen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 70 ragtop View Post
    Sorry Zip, that was me, I realized it was the P-8 right after I posted and tryed to edit before you read it..

    Hoping you could provide a little guidance. I saw GPete's rules, but as this is a few years old, and many pages long, I'm thinking the rules may have developed over time.

    So you provide three clues initially?
    Do you provide another clue each time someone guesses, or each day, or ??
    Limited to US military, or worldwide?
    Rotor, fixed wing, and military aviation personnel are all acceptable?
    Is there a era range?

    Thanks Mike
    Mike,
    There really aren't much of a limitation as to what you can post, as long as it's "Warbird" related. Any country, any war, any military. If you look back through you will see that we have had questions asking about warbirds, pilots, and I recently had one on a crew chief for a P-51. As long as it's related to warbirds somehjow.

    How many clues you give out initially is up to you. Some guys will offer up one initial, but it's going to be a tough questions some guys will offer up 2 or 3 initial clues to help everybody get started. Normally we will have a morning and an evening clue, but if your times on RCU don't allow that post your clues when you have a chance. Usually when somebody makes a guess we'll offer up another clue, but that's not set in stone. Sometimes a quiz may be short on clues, so you'll want to feed those out sparingly. But if you have a lot of clues to your quiz you can feed them out as you see fit. It's up to you as the quiz-meister!!!

    Look back through the pages of this thread and you'll get a feel for how it's been going.

    Ken
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    Thanks Ken
    Did a little reading thru past few pages, not sure I can do a morning and afternoon question, But looking at the questions you guys have been putting on the table, I seriously doubt it will take too long to come up with the ight question...HAHA

    I will come up with a question and post tonight
    Mike
    P-38 Lightning Brotherhood #1
    P-51 Mustang Brotherhood #51

  25. #9175

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    70 ragtop; RCKen was right on the money. Often, the first few clues are almost worthless. In those cases, I try to offer more than one clue. The rule is at least one new clue every 24 hours, but more often if you like. Any plane used by the military is fair game. Thanks; Ernie P.

    Quote Originally Posted by RCKen View Post
    Mike,
    There really aren't much of a limitation as to what you can post, as long as it's "Warbird" related. Any country, any war, any military. If you look back through you will see that we have had questions asking about warbirds, pilots, and I recently had one on a crew chief for a P-51. As long as it's related to warbirds somehjow.

    How many clues you give out initially is up to you. Some guys will offer up one initial, but it's going to be a tough questions some guys will offer up 2 or 3 initial clues to help everybody get started. Normally we will have a morning and an evening clue, but if your times on RCU don't allow that post your clues when you have a chance. Usually when somebody makes a guess we'll offer up another clue, but that's not set in stone. Sometimes a quiz may be short on clues, so you'll want to feed those out sparingly. But if you have a lot of clues to your quiz you can feed them out as you see fit. It's up to you as the quiz-meister!!!

    Look back through the pages of this thread and you'll get a feel for how it's been going.

    Ken


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