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Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

Old 01-08-2014, 10:45 AM
  #9201
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The manned V-1's (Fi-103R Reichenberg) would have been given a similar insulting name had they made it in to service, I'm sure of that.

But no, not the Baka.

I'll wait until end of day before delivering a clue.

I hope WWII pilotless vengeance weapons are not too far off track for this thread..?
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Old 01-08-2014, 11:04 AM
  #9202
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Could it be the Bachem Ba 349 Natter?

Cris
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Old 01-08-2014, 12:18 PM
  #9203
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Nope..

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Old 01-08-2014, 12:25 PM
  #9204
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He's making it easy, guys. Think about it and the answer will be obvious. Thanks; Ernie P.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MJD View Post
Nope..


Last edited by Ernie P.; 01-08-2014 at 12:26 PM. Reason: misspelling
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Old 01-08-2014, 12:26 PM
  #9205
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If the picture is a clue then it has to be a Republic-Ford JB-2 Loon.

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Old 01-08-2014, 12:58 PM
  #9206
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Ta-Da!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1prsi1beze0 - at 25 seconds you see a launch sequence, this is one segment that shows up in V-1 documentaries.

I read interesting accounts of the engine static tests - they were fired vertically, and rattled the bejeezus out of the buildings around.
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Old 01-09-2014, 07:31 AM
  #9207
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OK I think I have one that will get you using your gray matter.

1. This Ground-Attack / Dive bomber was introduced in 1942.
2. She was used by the United States during World War II.
3. She had slatted dive brakes installed on the top and bottom of her wings.

Good Luck!
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Old 01-09-2014, 08:15 AM
  #9208
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sekhet View Post
OK I think I have one that will get you using your gray matter.

1. This Ground-Attack / Dive bomber was introduced in 1942.
2. She was used by the United States during World War II.
3. She had slatted dive brakes installed on the top and bottom of her wings.

Good Luck!
Cris
Hi guys, nice to see the thread is still going. Sekhet sounds like you may be thinking of the North American A-36 Apache. Later to become the P-51 Mustang.
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Old 01-09-2014, 08:24 AM
  #9209
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Wow, that was fast, the North American A-36 Apache is the correct answer!

Major Tomski, you have the floor!

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Old 01-09-2014, 08:25 PM
  #9210
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OK, off the top of my head;

1. This fighter was single seat, single engined and twin gunned.
2. It used advanced construction techniques and materials
3. It's designer was active for over 30 years.
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Old 01-10-2014, 06:41 AM
  #9211
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MajorTomski View Post
OK, off the top of my head;

1. This fighter was single seat, single engined and twin gunned.
2. It used advanced construction techniques and materials
3. It's designer was active for over 30 years.

I haven't taken a shot in a while. How about the Fokker Eindecker E-4? At the risk of mixing models, it was the first fighter to carry two (or three) forward firing maching guns, and it used a steel tubing chassis. Fokker was only active just under 30 years, though. His first plane was designed in 1910, and he died in 1939. Thanks; Ernie P.


The Eindecker was based on Fokker's unarmed Fokker M.5K scout (military designation Fokker A.III) itself following very closely the design of the French Morane-Saulnier H shoulder-wing monoplane, but using chrome-molybdenum steel tubing for the basic fuselage structure instead of wooden components. It was fitted with an early version of the Fokker synchronizer mechanism controlling a single Parabellum MG14 machine gun. Anthony Fokker personally demonstrated the system on 23 May 1915, having towed the prototype aircraft behind his touring car to a military airfield near Berlin.

The Fokker E.IV was the final variant of the Eindecker fighter aircraft that was operated by Germany during World War I.

Given the Fokker designation of M.15, the E.IV was essentially a lengthened Fokker E.III powered by the 119 kW (160 hp) Oberursel U.III two-row, 14-cylinder rotary engine, a copy of the Gnome Double Lambda. The more powerful engine was intended to enable the Eindecker to carry two or three 7.92 mm (.312 in) machine guns, thereby increasing its firepower and providing redundancy if one gun jammed - a common occurrence at the time. However, the E.IV was a troubled design that never achieved the success of its predecessor and was soon out-classed by French and British fighters.


The prototype E.IV was accepted for testing by the German Inspektion der Fliegertruppen in September 1915. It was fitted with three forward-firing 7.92 mm (.312 in) lMG 08 "Spandau" machine guns, mounted to fire upwards at 15°. Anthony Fokker demonstrated the E.IV at Essen but the complicated triple-synchronization gear failed and the propeller was damaged. The removal of the left-side gun is believed to have been pioneered on Oswald Boelcke's E.IV, believed to have borne IdFlieg serial 123/15, with a simpler double-synchronisation system used on the retained center-line and right side MG 08 Spandau guns. The fitment of dual MG 08 "Spandau" forward-firing, synchronized machine guns became the standard armament for production E.IVs, and indeed for all subsequent German D-type biplane fighters. The angling of the guns was also abandoned.
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Old 01-11-2014, 08:19 AM
  #9212
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MajorTomski;

You still with us? Thanks; Ernie P.
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Old 01-11-2014, 10:44 AM
  #9213
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Sorry Ernie, really busy lately. You're warm but no

1. This fighter was single seat, single engined and twin gunned.
2. It used advanced construction techniques and materials
3. It's designer was active for over 30 years.
4. Low wing open cockpit.
5. Two different production versions.
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Old 01-11-2014, 03:48 PM
  #9214
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MajorTomski View Post
Sorry Ernie, really busy lately. You're warm but no

1. This fighter was single seat, single engined and twin gunned.
2. It used advanced construction techniques and materials
3. It's designer was active for over 30 years.
4. Low wing open cockpit.
5. Two different production versions.

Then I'd say you were going with the Junkers. Thanks; Ernie P.


The Junkers D.I (factory designation J 9) was a fighter aircraft produced in Germany late in World War I, significant for becoming the first all-metal fighter to enter service. The prototype, a private venture by Junkers designated the J 7, first flew on 17 September 1917, going through nearly a half-dozen detail changes in its design during its tests.


Demonstrated to the Idflieg early the following year, it proved impressive enough to result in an order for three additional aircraft for trials. However, the changes made by
Junkers were significant enough for the firm to redesignate the next example the J 9, which was supplied to the Idflieg instead of the three J 7s ordered.
During tests, the J 9 was felt to lack the maneuverability necessary for a front-line fighter, but was judged fit for a naval fighter, and a batch of 12 was ordered. These were to have been supplied to a naval unit by September 1918, but instead equipped the same unit redeployed to the Eastern Front after the Armistice. One survives in the Musée de l'Air et de l'Espace, outside Paris, France.
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Old 01-12-2014, 06:06 AM
  #9215
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That's it! go ofr it
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Old 01-12-2014, 12:25 PM
  #9216
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MajorTomski View Post
That's it! go ofr it
Thank you, Sir. This next warbird has always fascinated me. I hope it interests all of you. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What warbird do I describe?

Clues:

(1) There were only two prototypes constructed; but its influence was perhaps profound.
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Old 01-12-2014, 03:43 PM
  #9217
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Evening clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What warbird do I describe?

Clues:

(1) There were only two prototypes constructed; but its influence was perhaps profound.

(2) It was a single seat, single engine, low wing monoplane of all metal construction.
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Old 01-12-2014, 04:47 PM
  #9218
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernie P. View Post
Evening clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What warbird do I describe?

Clues:

(1) There were only two prototypes constructed; but its influence was perhaps profound.

(2) It was a single seat, single engine, low wing monoplane of all metal construction.
I think I found this one through a Google search. But I'm going to hold off for a bit with the answer!!!

Ken
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Old 01-13-2014, 06:20 AM
  #9219
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Hmm.. I was about to spout MB-5 but only one of those were built..
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Old 01-13-2014, 06:30 AM
  #9220
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MJD View Post
Hmm.. I was about to spout MB-5 but only one of those were built..

No, not the MB-5. Perhaps this morning clue will help. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What warbird do I describe?

Clues:

(1) There were only two prototypes constructed; but its influence was perhaps profound.

(2) It was a single seat, single engine, low wing monoplane of all metal construction.

(3) It was equipped with a tailwheel and retractible main landing gear.
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Old 01-13-2014, 08:32 AM
  #9221
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An afternoon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What warbird do I describe?

Clues:

(1) There were only two prototypes constructed; but its influence was perhaps profound.

(2) It was a single seat, single engine, low wing monoplane of all metal construction.

(3) It was equipped with a tailwheel and retractible main landing gear.

(4) It was a promising design, but by the time it was ready for production, other perhaps more capable aircraft were already in production. So, this one was abandoned by the powers that be.
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Old 01-13-2014, 01:07 PM
  #9222
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Evening clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What warbird do I describe?

Clues:

(1) There were only two prototypes constructed; but its influence was perhaps profound.

(2) It was a single seat, single engine, low wing monoplane of all metal construction.

(3) It was equipped with a tailwheel and retractible main landing gear.

(4) It was a promising design, but by the time it was ready for production, other perhaps more capable aircraft were already in production. So, this one was abandoned by the powers that be.

(5) To some it was an unneeded design. But others may well have seen it as a pattern.
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Old 01-13-2014, 02:40 PM
  #9223
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The best I can come up with is the Curtis XP-46, with the influence being the data gathered (and purchased) from the radiator design influencing P-51 development?
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Old 01-13-2014, 03:40 PM
  #9224
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MJD View Post
The best I can come up with is the Curtis XP-46, with the influence being the data gathered (and purchased) from the radiator design influencing P-51 development?

No, sorry. But this clue may aid your search. I think this plane may be even less known, and the story less told, than I would have expected. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What warbird do I describe?

Clues:

(1) There were only two prototypes constructed; but its influence was perhaps profound.

(2) It was a single seat, single engine, low wing monoplane of all metal construction.

(3) It was equipped with a tailwheel and retractible main landing gear.

(4) It was a promising design, but by the time it was ready for production, other perhaps more capable aircraft were already in production. So, this one was abandoned by the powers that be.

(5) To some it was an unneeded design. But others may well have seen it as a pattern.

(6) It was intended to meet a specific design for use in a certain area; but eventually it was decided to leave both the design and the use unfilled. This was perhaps due to more pressing concerns.
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Old 01-13-2014, 04:27 PM
  #9225
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Curtiss XP-46?

Oops, sorry MJD. I didn't see your previous post: My bad!

Last edited by JohnnyS; 01-13-2014 at 07:24 PM.
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