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  1. #9301

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    Afternoon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What warbird equipment do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) The original design was obtained by England in 1938; but an improved version became available in mid 1940.

    (2) The design was later copied, and simplified, by the United States.

    (3) The English then altered their design to copy the American improvements.

    (4) This design initially increased the effectiveness of the Spit’s and Hurri’s; but was later used by almost all English aircraft.

    (5) As a confusing cover story, it was called by the name of the original inventor.

    (6) Pilots were adamant that the new design gave them a distinct advantage.

  2. #9302

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    OK, think this fits; The de Wilde incendiary round?
    Al Gunn
    Ultra Sport Brotherhood No. 9

  3. #9303

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    Turbo supercharger ?

  4. #9304

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    Quote Originally Posted by Top_Gunn View Post
    OK, think this fits; The de Wilde incendiary round?

    Right you are, Top_Gunn! Good job, Sir! The 0.303 Incendiary B Mark VI round was called "de Wilde" as a confusion factor, to hide the fact the British had found a way to improve the round and make it manufacturable, rather than by hand. The ammunition was normally loaded 1/1 with normal ammo, and functioned as a tracer round as well. It also made a noticeable "flash" upon striling an enemy aircraft, thereby aiding the aiming of the firing pilot. It also had the benefit of functioning very well, as many German pilots attested. You are up, Sir; and I am off to visit far places for a few days. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What warbird equipment do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) The original design was obtained by England in 1938; but an improved version became available in mid 1940.

    (2) The design was later copied, and simplified, by the United States.

    (3) The English then altered their design to copy the American improvements.

    (4) This design initially increased the effectiveness of the Spit’s and Hurri’s; but was later used by almost all English aircraft.

    (5) As a confusing cover story, it was called by the name of the original inventor.

    (6) Pilots were adamant that the new design gave them a distinct advantage.

    (7) And documentation shows enemy pilots agreed with their opinion.

    Answer: The 0.303 Incendiary B Mark VI; de Wilde ammunition


    During World War II, incendiary bullets found a new use: they became one of the preferred types of ammunition for use in interceptor fighters. They were not nearly as effective at puncturing enemy bomber aircraft as armor piercing bullets, but were far more effective than standard bullets because they could also ignite fuel if they came into contact with a fuel tank or pipeline.

    Belgium inventor de Wilde who was living in Switzerland invented a new bullet in 1938. In December of that year the British Air Ministry purchased the design. However as the bullet had to be made by hand rather then massed produced Major C. Aubrey Dixon of the British Royal Arsenal at Woolwich developed a greatly improved bullet with similar incendiary capabilities. This was adopted by British forces as the 0.303 Incendiary B Mark VI. For security reasons and to confuse the enemy it was initially called 'de Wilde' ammunition, even though the design was almost entirely different from the original version. The B Mark VI incendiary bullet was packed with nitrocellulose, and a small steel ball was placed in the tip of the bullet to ensure that the chemical exploded on impact. As opposed to earlier designs, the M Mark VI was a true incendiary rather than tracer ammunition. The B Mark VI incendiary bullets were first issued in June 1940 and tested operationally in the Hawker Hurricane and Supermarine Spitfire in the air battles
    over Dunkirk. The explosive power, coupled with the flash on impact which guided their aim, was much appreciated by pilots. The bullets were at first in short supply, as a result a mix of ball, AP, Mk IV incendiary tracer and Mk VI incendiary were used until production increased to sufficient levels. By 1942 the standard loading for fixed .303s was half loaded with AP and half with incendiary bullets.

    One fighter pilot who was shot down by incendiary ammunition while flying in the Battle of Britain describes his experience:

    "I could smell powder smoke, hot and strong, but it didn't make me feel tough this time. It was from the cannon shells and incendiary bullets that had hit my machine...Bullets were going between my legs, and I remember seeing a bright flash of an incendiary bullet going past my leg into the gas tank...Then a little red tongue licked out inquiringly from under the gas tank in front of my feet and became a hot little bonfire in one corner of the cockpit."

    The British Mk VI bullet was copied by USA in simplified form, for both their .30 and .50 aircraft bullets. The British then adopted the simplified design as the Mk VII bullet.

  5. #9305

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    Great question to research, Ernie. I'll come up with something tomorrow.
    Al Gunn
    Ultra Sport Brotherhood No. 9

  6. #9306

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    Looking for an airplane.

    1. First prototype flew in 1942

    2. The country in which it was designed and built never used it in combat, but two other countries did.
    Al Gunn
    Ultra Sport Brotherhood No. 9

  7. #9307

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    Morning clue.

    1. First prototype flew in 1942

    2. The country in which it was designed and built never used it in combat, but two other countries did.

    3. One of the two countries that used it in combat did so in World War II. The other one used it later.
    Al Gunn
    Ultra Sport Brotherhood No. 9

  8. #9308

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    Mig-11?
    P-51 Mustang Brotherhood#5
    Airtronics SD-10G
    Top-Flite P-51D (in progress)


  9. #9309

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    Not Mig-11. Here's another clue.

    1. First prototype flew in 1942

    2. The country in which it was designed and built never used it in combat, but two other countries did.

    3. One of the two countries that used it in combat did so in World War II. The other one used it later.

    4. It was not a trainer, but the country in which it was manufactured used a much-modified version of it in a training capacity.
    Al Gunn
    Ultra Sport Brotherhood No. 9

  10. #9310

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    This morning's clue.

    1. First prototype flew in 1942

    2. The country in which it was designed and built never used it in combat, but two other countries did.

    3. One of the two countries that used it in combat did so in World War II. The other one used it later.

    4. It was not a trainer, but the country in which it was manufactured used a much-modified version of it in a training capacity.

    5. Single engine monoplane.
    Al Gunn
    Ultra Sport Brotherhood No. 9

  11. #9311

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    Today's clue.

    1. First prototype flew in 1942

    2. The country in which it was designed and built never used it in combat, but two other countries did.

    3. One of the two countries that used it in combat did so in World War II. The other one used it later.

    4. It was not a trainer, but the country in which it was manufactured used a much-modified version of it in a training capacity.

    5. Single engine monoplane.

    6. Standard armament was a cannon and machine guns in the nose. Additional armament could be carried under the wing.
    Al Gunn
    Ultra Sport Brotherhood No. 9

  12. #9312
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    I believe I have the answer!

    Bell P-63 Kingcobra.

    Used by the Russians in WW2 and the French in IndoChina

    Also used by the USA for gunnery training

    Terry

  13. #9313

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    P-63 it is! Sometimes called the "flying pinball" when used as a target for gunnery training with armor plating, frangible bullets, orange paint, and a light that flashed when it was hit. Kind of a sad end for a good plane that made it to production just a little too late.

    You're up, Terry. Good job.
    Al Gunn
    Ultra Sport Brotherhood No. 9

  14. #9314
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    Rats, now I have to come up with a question!!!! OK, try this one:

    Apart from being one of the fastest aircraft around at its time this twin engined bomber had one unsual characteristic that set it apart.


    Terry

  15. #9315

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    RAF Mosquito, made from plywood because metal was unavailable?
    P-51 Mustang Brotherhood#5
    Airtronics SD-10G
    Top-Flite P-51D (in progress)


  16. #9316
    Redback's Avatar
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    Nope, not the Mozzie, though it was as fast or maybe even faster.

    Terry

  17. #9317
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    Quote Originally Posted by Redback View Post
    Nope, not the Mozzie, though it was as fast or maybe even faster.

    Terry
    Another clue ?
    Look towards the Horizon......your death awaits you there So Enjoy today ,,,,,,

  18. #9318
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    Arado 234?

    Twin engine bomber
    Fast!
    Unusual characteristic: jet powered
    Sorry I'm late dear, I had to help my uncle Jack off his horse.

  19. #9319
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    OK here's anpother

    Apart from being one of the fastest aircraft around at its time this twin engined bomber had one unsual characteristic that set it apart.
    First flew in 1944 but did not get into operational service


    Terry
    Last edited by Redback; 02-10-2014 at 07:59 PM.

  20. #9320
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    Dornier Do335 Arrow
    Look towards the Horizon......your death awaits you there So Enjoy today ,,,,,,

  21. #9321
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    German Horton Ho 229??

    The take off is optional, but the landing is MANDATORY!!
    RCU Forum Manager
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    Brotherhood's
    Ultra Sport Brother #1
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  22. #9322

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    Quote Originally Posted by Redback View Post
    OK here's anpother

    Apart from being one of the fastest aircraft around at its time this twin engined bomber had one unsual characteristic that set it apart.
    First flew in 1944 but did get into operational service


    Terry
    How about the Bristol Brigand? Twin tails, dive bombing, torpedo bomber and over 350 MPH. Thanks; Ernie P.


    The Bristol Brigand was a British anti-shipping/ground attack/dive bomber attack aircraft developed by the Bristol Aeroplane Company as a replacement for the Beaufighter. A total of 147 were built, and they served with the Royal Air Force in Malaya during the Malayan Emergency and Kenya until replaced by the de Havilland Hornet in Malaya and the English Electric Canberra jet bomber elsewhere.

    The Bristol Type 164 was the outcome of the 1942 Air Ministry specification H.7/42 calling for a faster edition of the Beaufighter for long-range torpedo work and anti-shipping strikes.

    Bristol design team under Leslie J. Frise used the wings, tail and undercarriage of the Buckingham with a new fuselage of oval cross-section. The three crew - pilot, navigator/bomb aimer and radio-operator/gunner were grouped together in the forward cockpit. In spite of the official change in its role to a bomber, the first 11 Brigands off the production line were completed as torpedo bombers. These initial aircraft served with the RAF Coastal Command from 1946–1947 before being converted to bombers.

    The first unit to convert from Beaufighters to the Brigand was 45 Squadron, then based at RAF Station Tengah on the Island of Singapore and flying operations in support of British forces against the Communist Guerrillas then engaged in an insurgency in Malaya. The first Brigand was flown to Tengah from RAF St Athan in November 1949, a 16-day trip. After test flights, the first combat operation was conducted by this single Brigand, piloted by Flight Lieutenant Dalton Golding and crewed by radio/radar operator Peter Weston, together with four Beaufighters of No. 45 Squadron against CT targets in jungle west of Kluang, Malaya on 19 December 1949. On this flight, the Brigand carried three rockets, one 500 lb (230 kg) and two 1,000 lb (450 kg) bombs. The operation was successful, and No. 45 Squadron soon completed its transition to the Brigand as more aircraft arrived.

    Thereafter, Brigands of 45 Squadron and, soon thereafter, 84 Squadron were routinely engaged in strikes against Communist Insurgent targets throughout Malaya, both direct and in close support of ground forces, as well as providing air cover as needed to convoys on the ground against possible ambushes.

    Problems with the Brigand became apparent during its operations in Malaya. The first problem to arise were undercarriages failing to lower. This was traced to rubber seals in the hydraulic jacks gradually breaking up because of the hot, humid climatic conditions, for which they weren't suitable. Just as this problem was being resolved another problem arose, more serious because it led to fatalities; a propensity for aircraft damage and loss during strafing runs employing the four 20 mm cannon. It was ascertained that a build up of gases in the long cannon blast tubes, which ran under the cockpit, were igniting through use of high-explosive shells. This in turn severed hydraulic lines, which would burn. In effect, the Brigands were shooting themselves down. This was cured by drastically reducing the ammunition loads and using only ball rounds. The Brigand also had a propensity to shed one propeller blade leading to complete propeller failure, which in turn would lead to the engine being wrenched off the wing, and an inevitable crash. This was found to be caused by corrosion in the propeller locking rings. More frequent maintenance helped alleviate this problem. When everything was working properly the Brigand was considered to be a good aircraft to fly by its pilots:

    "The Brigand was pleasant to fly, having nicely balanced flying controls and a wide range of power in the two Bristol Centaurus engines. These features made the aircraft splendid for formation flying, which was important to our method of operation. The aircraft also had sufficient range to reach targets all over Malaya from the Squadron's new base at Tengah, on Singapore Island."

    As the Brigand became hedged in with more restrictions both unit commanders had serious doubts about continued use of the aircraft. It was decided to keep on operating them - as long as thorough maintenance was carried out it was felt that nothing else could go wrong.

    Unfortunately, another design flaw did arise in the leather bellows used to deploy air brake during dives. In the tropical climate in which the Brigand found itself in Malaya, the leather would rot away, causing the brakes to fail. This led to Brigands losing wings in dives due to excessive airspeed or rotation as only one brake deployed. When this problem was discovered, the air brakes of all Brigands were wired shut, decreasing the aircraft's dive bombing capabilities. No. 45 Squadron converted to de Havilland Hornets in January 1952 while 84 Squadron was disbanded in February 1953. Soon after this, the Brigands were grounded and withdrawn from service.
    Brigands were also used operationally over Aden by 8 Squadron from 1950 through to 1952. In 1952, after it was found that the Brigand's mainspars were suspect the Brigands were replaced by de Havilland Vampires.

  23. #9323

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    Quote Originally Posted by Redback View Post
    OK here's anpother

    Apart from being one of the fastest aircraft around at its time this twin engined bomber had one unsual characteristic that set it apart.
    First flew in 1944 but did get into operational service


    Terry
    How about the Bristol Brigand? Twin tails, dive bombing, torpedo bomber and over 350 MPH. Thanks; Ernie P.


    The Bristol Brigand was a British anti-shipping/ground attack/dive bomber attack aircraft developed by the Bristol Aeroplane Company as a replacement for the Beaufighter. A total of 147 were built, and they served with the Royal Air Force in Malaya during the Malayan Emergency and Kenya until replaced by the de Havilland Hornet in Malaya and the English Electric Canberra jet bomber elsewhere.

    The Bristol Type 164 was the outcome of the 1942 Air Ministry specification H.7/42 calling for a faster edition of the Beaufighter for long-range torpedo work and anti-shipping strikes.

    Bristol design team under Leslie J. Frise used the wings, tail and undercarriage of the Buckingham with a new fuselage of oval cross-section. The three crew - pilot, navigator/bomb aimer and radio-operator/gunner were grouped together in the forward cockpit. In spite of the official change in its role to a bomber, the first 11 Brigands off the production line were completed as torpedo bombers. These initial aircraft served with the RAF Coastal Command from 19461947 before being converted to bombers.

    The first unit to convert from Beaufighters to the Brigand was 45 Squadron, then based at RAF Station Tengah on the Island of Singapore and flying operations in support of British forces against the Communist Guerrillas then engaged in an insurgency in Malaya. The first Brigand was flown to Tengah from RAF St Athan in November 1949, a 16-day trip. After test flights, the first combat operation was conducted by this single Brigand, piloted by Flight Lieutenant Dalton Golding and crewed by radio/radar operator Peter Weston, together with four Beaufighters of No. 45 Squadron against CT targets in jungle west of Kluang, Malaya on 19 December 1949. On this flight, the Brigand carried three rockets, one 500 lb (230 kg) and two 1,000 lb (450 kg) bombs. The operation was successful, and No. 45 Squadron soon completed its transition to the Brigand as more aircraft arrived.

    Thereafter, Brigands of 45 Squadron and, soon thereafter, 84 Squadron were routinely engaged in strikes against Communist Insurgent targets throughout Malaya, both direct and in close support of ground forces, as well as providing air cover as needed to convoys on the ground against possible ambushes.

    Problems with the Brigand became apparent during its operations in Malaya. The first problem to arise were undercarriages failing to lower. This was traced to rubber seals in the hydraulic jacks gradually breaking up because of the hot, humid climatic conditions, for which they weren't suitable. Just as this problem was being resolved another problem arose, more serious because it led to fatalities; a propensity for aircraft damage and loss during strafing runs employing the four 20 mm cannon. It was ascertained that a build up of gases in the long cannon blast tubes, which ran under the cockpit, were igniting through use of high-explosive shells. This in turn severed hydraulic lines, which would burn. In effect, the Brigands were shooting themselves down. This was cured by drastically reducing the ammunition loads and using only ball rounds. The Brigand also had a propensity to shed one propeller blade leading to complete propeller failure, which in turn would lead to the engine being wrenched off the wing, and an inevitable crash. This was found to be caused by corrosion in the propeller locking rings. More frequent maintenance helped alleviate this problem. When everything was working properly the Brigand was considered to be a good aircraft to fly by its pilots:

    "The Brigand was pleasant to fly, having nicely balanced flying controls and a wide range of power in the two Bristol Centaurus engines. These features made the aircraft splendid for formation flying, which was important to our method of operation. The aircraft also had sufficient range to reach targets all over Malaya from the Squadron's new base at Tengah, on Singapore Island."

    As the Brigand became hedged in with more restrictions both unit commanders had serious doubts about continued use of the aircraft. It was decided to keep on operating them - as long as thorough maintenance was carried out it was felt that nothing else could go wrong.

    Unfortunately, another design flaw did arise in the leather bellows used to deploy air brake during dives. In the tropical climate in which the Brigand found itself in Malaya, the leather would rot away, causing the brakes to fail. This led to Brigands losing wings in dives due to excessive airspeed or rotation as only one brake deployed. When this problem was discovered, the air brakes of all Brigands were wired shut, decreasing the aircraft's dive bombing capabilities. No. 45 Squadron converted to de Havilland Hornets in January 1952 while 84 Squadron was disbanded in February 1953. Soon after this, the Brigands were grounded and withdrawn from service.
    Brigands were also used operationally over Aden by 8 Squadron from 1950 through to 1952. In 1952, after it was found that the Brigand's mainspars were suspect the Brigands were replaced by de Havilland Vampires.

  24. #9324
    Redback's Avatar
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    No to the Pfeil or the Horton OR the Bristol Brigand.

    Just noticed I missed a not, it did NOT get into service. This one's going better than I thought it would!

    Another clue:

    Some accounts say that this aircraft was seen as a contingency for a much larger one.

    Terry

  25. #9325

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    Quote Originally Posted by Redback View Post
    No to the Pfeil or the Horton OR the Bristol Brigand.

    Just noticed I missed a not, it did NOT get into service. This one's going better than I thought it would!

    Another clue:

    Some accounts say that this aircraft was seen as a contingency for a much larger one.

    Terry

    "NOT" get into service? Okay; back to my first guess: The XB-42 Mixmaster; originally a potential stand in for the B-29. Thanks; Ernie P.


    The Douglas XB-42 Mixmaster was an experimental bomber aircraft, designed for a high top speed. The unconventional approach was to mount the two engines within the fuselage driving a pair of contra-rotating propellers mounted at the tail, leaving the wing and fuselage clean and free of drag-inducing protrusions.

    Two prototype aircraft were built, but the end of World War II changed priorities and the advent of the jet engine gave an alternative way toward achieving high speed.

    The XB-42 was developed initially as a private venture; an unsolicited proposal was presented to the United States Army Air Forces in May 1943. This resulted in an Air Force contract for two prototypes and one static test airframe, the USAAF seeing an intriguing possibility of finding a bomber capable of the Boeing B-29 Superfortress' range without its size or cost.

    The aircraft mounted a pair of Allison V-1710-125 liquid-cooled V-12 engines behind the crew's cabin, each driving one of the twin propellers. Air intakes were in the wing leading edge. The undercarriage was tricycle and a full, four surface cruciform tail was fitted, whose ventral fin/rudder unit prevented the coaxial propellers from striking the ground. The pilot and co-pilot sat under twin bubble canopies, and the bombardier sat in the extreme front behind a plexiglass nose.

    Defensive armament was two 0.50 in (12.7 mm) machine guns each side in the trailing edge of the wing, which retracted into the wing when not in use. These guns were aimed by the copilot through a sighting station at the rear of his cockpit. The guns had a limited field of fire and could only cover the rear, but with the aircraft's high speed it was thought unlikely that intercepting fighters would be attacking from any other angle.

    Two more guns were fitted to fire directly forward. Initially ordered as attack aircraft (XA-42) in the summer of 1943, this variant would have been armed with 16 machine guns or a 75 mm (2.95 in) cannon and two machine guns.

    The first XB-42 was delivered to the Army Air Force and flew at Palm Springs, California on 6 May 1944. Performance was excellent, being basically as described in the original proposal; as fast or faster than the de Havilland Mosquito but with defensive armament and twice the bombload. The twin bubble canopies proved a bad idea as communications were adversely affected and a single bubble canopy was substituted after the first flight.

    Testing revealed the XB-42 suffered from some instability as excessive yaw was encountered, vibrations, and poor engine cooling - all problems that could probably have been dealt with. Due to the vertical stabilizer and rudder located underneath the fuselage, careful handling during taxiing, takeoff and landing was required because of limited ground clearance.

    The end of World War II, though, allowed the Air Force to consider possibilities with a little more leisure and it was decided to wait for the development of better jet bombers rather than continue with the B-42 program.

    In December 1945, Captain Glen Edwards and Lt. Col. Henry E. Warden set a new transcontinental speed record when they flew the XB-42 from Long Beach, California to Bolling Air Force Base in Washington, D.C. (c. 2,300 miles) and in just 5 hours, 17 minutes, the XB-42 set a speed record of 433.6 mph (697.8 km/h).

    The record-breaking XB-42 prototype had been destroyed in a crash at Bolling Field attributed to a failure of the landing gear, but the other was used in flight test programs, including fulfilling a December 1943 proposal by Douglas to fit uprated engines and underwing Westinghouse 19XB-2A axial-flow turbojets of 1,600 lbf (7.1 kN) thrust each, making it the XB-42A.

    In this configuration, it first flew at Muroc (now Edwards Air Force Base) on 27 May 1947. In testing, it reached 488 mph (785 km/h). After 22 flights, the lower vertical stabilizer and rudder were damaged in a hard landing in 1947. The XB-42A was repaired but never flew again, and was taken off the AAF inventory on 30 June 1949.


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