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Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

Old 02-11-2014, 12:25 PM
  #9326
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XB-42 Mixmaster is correct!

Strange name for an aircraft, sounds like it would be more at home in the kitchen than on a runway!

Nevertheless an unusual and promising aircraft which, like so many, came to an end with the end of the war and the advent of jets.

Ernie, you are up!


Terry
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Old 02-11-2014, 12:38 PM
  #9327
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I'll tell you what, I have never seen the XB-42 Mixmaster before (that's why I'm loving this thread. I'm learning something new all the time.). But after I saw Ernie's answer I was mesmerized. What an interesting plane. Man that would make a really cool RC subject if the engineering could be worked out!!!! It's had me thinking all morning long, and i've been sketching on paper all morning to see if maybe it would be possible to build one!!! I know that Evin Quiros had a Dornier 335 that had a internal engine that ran a pusher prop (unfortunately I filmed the demise of the plane) so the engineering is possible. really have to think this one over!!!!



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Old 02-11-2014, 02:20 PM
  #9328
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i tripped over this one researching for another question. Didn't fit the clues so I stored it away for future use.

Looks like a 4 point landing would be all too easy to achieve!

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Old 02-11-2014, 02:54 PM
  #9329
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I was thinking that your landings would have to be perfect ever time or your going to have tail damage. and reading the wiki on it they say that was what happened to one of the prototypes on a hard landing.

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Old 02-11-2014, 04:10 PM
  #9330
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Redback View Post
XB-42 Mixmaster is correct!

Strange name for an aircraft, sounds like it would be more at home in the kitchen than on a runway!

Nevertheless an unusual and promising aircraft which, like so many, came to an end with the end of the war and the advent of jets.

Ernie, you are up!


Terry
Thank you, Sir! I hope this will keep every one entertained. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What famed aviator designer do I describe?

Clues:

(1) He began as a world famous pilot; and won or placed highly in several international competitions.
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Old 02-11-2014, 04:16 PM
  #9331
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RCKen View Post
I'll tell you what, I have never seen the XB-42 Mixmaster before (that's why I'm loving this thread. I'm learning something new all the time.). But after I saw Ernie's answer I was mesmerized. What an interesting plane. Man that would make a really cool RC subject if the engineering could be worked out!!!! It's had me thinking all morning long, and i've been sketching on paper all morning to see if maybe it would be possible to build one!!! I know that Evin Quiros had a Dornier 335 that had a internal engine that ran a pusher prop (unfortunately I filmed the demise of the plane) so the engineering is possible. really have to think this one over!!!!



Ken
I'd suggest you go with an electric moror, and keep the batteries and electrics as far forward as possible. The contra rotating propellers will be the big problem. Maybe have the forward (inner) propeller drive the plane, and have the rear propeller windmill? It won't be easy. Thanks; Ernie P.
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Old 02-11-2014, 06:53 PM
  #9332
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Late night clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What famed aviator designer do I describe?

Clues:

(1) He began as a world famous pilot; and won or placed highly in several international competitions.

(2) Then he became an aircraft designer. He began work with a couple of noted aircraft companies, then switched to a newly reconstituted, and famous, company; which already had the services of another pre-eminent designer.
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Old 02-12-2014, 02:10 AM
  #9333
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Early morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What famed aviator designer do I describe?

Clues:

(1) He began as a world famous pilot; and won or placed highly in several international competitions.

(2) Then he became an aircraft designer. He began work with a couple of noted aircraft companies, then switched to a newly reconstituted, and famous, company; which already had the services of another pre-eminent designer.

(3) He assisted in the design of a famed commercial airplane; one which was the basis for an iconic aircraft known to all warbird enthusiasts.
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Old 02-12-2014, 05:46 AM
  #9334
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And a mid-morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What famed aviator designer do I describe?

Clues:

(1) He began as a world famous pilot; and won or placed highly in several international competitions.

(2) Then he became an aircraft designer. He began work with a couple of noted aircraft companies, then switched to a newly reconstituted, and famous, company; which already had the services of another pre-eminent designer.

(3) He assisted in the design of a famed commercial airplane; one which was the basis for an iconic aircraft known to all warbird enthusiasts.

(4) Then he became the chief designer for the company, and headed the team of designers working on a new project. This aircraft was not particularly successful in its original role, but was far more successful in follow on uses. It remained in every day use and production for a long time, for the period.
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Old 02-12-2014, 08:22 AM
  #9335
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Afternoon clue (A bit early). Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What famed aviator designer do I describe?

Clues:

(1) He began as a world famous pilot; and won or placed highly in several international competitions.

(2) Then he became an aircraft designer. He began work with a couple of noted aircraft companies, then switched to a newly reconstituted, and famous, company; which already had the services of another pre-eminent designer.

(3) He assisted in the design of a famed commercial airplane; one which was the basis for an iconic aircraft known to all warbird enthusiasts.

(4) Then he became the chief designer for the company, and headed the team of designers working on a new project. This aircraft was not particularly successful in its original role, but was far more successful in follow on uses. It remained in every day use and production for a long time, for the period.

(5) He then moved to another, competitor, company. There he worked on a seminal aircraft which was not to see production; but one which was ground breaking in its design.
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Old 02-12-2014, 12:10 PM
  #9336
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Late afternoon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What famed aviator designer do I describe?

Clues:

(1) He began as a world famous pilot; and won or placed highly in several international competitions.

(2) Then he became an aircraft designer. He began work with a couple of noted aircraft companies, then switched to a newly reconstituted, and famous, company; which already had the services of another pre-eminent designer.

(3) He assisted in the design of a famed commercial airplane; one which was the basis for an iconic aircraft known to all warbird enthusiasts.

(4) Then he became the chief designer for the company, and headed the team of designers working on a new project. This aircraft was not particularly successful in its original role, but was far more successful in follow on uses. It remained in every day use and production for a long time, for the period.

(5) He then moved to another, competitor, company. There he worked on a seminal aircraft which was not to see production; but one which was ground breaking in its design.

(6) He then designed another aircraft. This one, which was initially considered to be too complicated and too filled with innovative ideas, was not put into production. This lead to his being fired by the man “whose name is on the door”; although a simplified version of his design was later put into limited production and considered to be a great aircraft.
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Old 02-12-2014, 02:36 PM
  #9337
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And an evening clue before I go try to find the snow shovel. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What famed aviator designer do I describe?

Clues:

(1) He began as a world famous pilot; and won or placed highly in several international competitions.

(2) Then he became an aircraft designer. He began work with a couple of noted aircraft companies, then switched to a newly reconstituted, and famous, company; which already had the services of another pre-eminent designer.

(3) He assisted in the design of a famed commercial airplane; one which was the basis for an iconic aircraft known to all warbird enthusiasts.

(4) Then he became the chief designer for the company, and headed the team of designers working on a new project. This aircraft was not particularly successful in its original role, but was far more successful in follow on uses. It remained in every day use and production for a long time, for the period.

(5) He then moved to another, competitor, company. There he worked on a seminal aircraft which was not to see production; but one which was ground breaking in its design.

(6) He then designed another aircraft. This one, which was initially considered to be too complicated and too filled with innovative ideas, was not put into production. This lead to his being fired by the man “whose name is on the door”; although a simplified version of his design was later put into limited production and considered to be a great aircraft.

(7) After being abruptly fired, he moved to yet another aircraft manufacturer, where he worked on a collaborative effort between the aircraft manufacturer and an engine company. This work lead him into a famous rivalry with a very well known aerospace designer; a rivalry which would last for many years.
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Old 02-12-2014, 02:44 PM
  #9338
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Hugh L. Dryden???

Ken
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Old 02-12-2014, 07:12 PM
  #9339
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RCKen View Post
Hugh L. Dryden???

Ken

No; not Dryden. But here's another clue to aid your search. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What famed aviator designer do I describe?

Clues:

(1) He began as a world famous pilot; and won or placed highly in several international competitions.

(2) Then he became an aircraft designer. He began work with a couple of noted aircraft companies, then switched to a newly reconstituted, and famous, company; which already had the services of another pre-eminent designer.

(3) He assisted in the design of a famed commercial airplane; one which was the basis for an iconic aircraft known to all warbird enthusiasts.

(4) Then he became the chief designer for the company, and headed the team of designers working on a new project. This aircraft was not particularly successful in its original role, but was far more successful in follow on uses. It remained in every day use and production for a long time, for the period.

(5) He then moved to another, competitor, company. There he worked on a seminal aircraft which was not to see production; but one which was ground breaking in its design.

(6) He then designed another aircraft. This one, which was initially considered to be too complicated and too filled with innovative ideas, was not put into production. This lead to his being fired by the man “whose name is on the door”; although a simplified version of his design was later put into limited production and considered to be a great aircraft.

(7) After being abruptly fired, he moved to yet another aircraft manufacturer, where he worked on a collaborative effort between the aircraft manufacturer and an engine company. This work lead him into a famous rivalry with a very well known aerospace designer; a rivalry which would last for many years.

(8) Although the ground breaking research and design effort in which he was involved (7) was at first troublesome, he eventually discovered a flaw in the wing design. After correcting that, the design worked; as any modern History book will attest.
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Old 02-13-2014, 03:19 AM
  #9340
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Early morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What famed aviator designer do I describe?

Clues:

(1) He began as a world famous pilot; and won or placed highly in several international competitions.

(2) Then he became an aircraft designer. He began work with a couple of noted aircraft companies, then switched to a newly reconstituted, and famous, company; which already had the services of another pre-eminent designer.

(3) He assisted in the design of a famed commercial airplane; one which was the basis for an iconic aircraft known to all warbird enthusiasts.

(4) Then he became the chief designer for the company, and headed the team of designers working on a new project. This aircraft was not particularly successful in its original role, but was far more successful in follow on uses. It remained in every day use and production for a long time, for the period.

(5) He then moved to another, competitor, company. There he worked on a seminal aircraft which was not to see production; but one which was ground breaking in its design.

(6) He then designed another aircraft. This one, which was initially considered to be too complicated and too filled with innovative ideas, was not put into production. This lead to his being fired by the man “whose name is on the door”; although a simplified version of his design was later put into limited production and considered to be a great aircraft.

(7) After being abruptly fired, he moved to yet another aircraft manufacturer, where he worked on a collaborative effort between the aircraft manufacturer and an engine company. This work lead him into a famous rivalry with a very well known aerospace designer; a rivalry which would last for many years.

(8) Although the ground breaking research and design effort in which he was involved (7) was at first troublesome, he eventually discovered a flaw in the wing design. After correcting that, the design worked; as any modern History book will attest.

(9) After the end of the war in which he gained such exposure, he moved to the United States to work with his main rival. He developed a method of predicting system reliability which today is considered a law in the field.
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Old 02-13-2014, 06:53 AM
  #9341
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A late morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What famed aviator designer do I describe?

Clues:

(1) He began as a world famous pilot; and won or placed highly in several international competitions.

(2) Then he became an aircraft designer. He began work with a couple of noted aircraft companies, then switched to a newly reconstituted, and famous, company; which already had the services of another pre-eminent designer.

(3) He assisted in the design of a famed commercial airplane; one which was the basis for an iconic aircraft known to all warbird enthusiasts.

(4) Then he became the chief designer for the company, and headed the team of designers working on a new project. This aircraft was not particularly successful in its original role, but was far more successful in follow on uses. It remained in every day use and production for a long time, for the period.

(5) He then moved to another, competitor, company. There he worked on a seminal aircraft which was not to see production; but one which was ground breaking in its design.

(6) He then designed another aircraft. This one, which was initially considered to be too complicated and too filled with innovative ideas, was not put into production. This lead to his being fired by the man “whose name is on the door”; although a simplified version of his design was later put into limited production and considered to be a great aircraft.

(7) After being abruptly fired, he moved to yet another aircraft manufacturer, where he worked on a collaborative effort between the aircraft manufacturer and an engine company. This work lead him into a famous rivalry with a very well known aerospace designer; a rivalry which would last for many years.

(8) Although the ground breaking research and design effort in which he was involved (7) was at first troublesome, he eventually discovered a flaw in the wing design. After correcting that, the design worked; as any modern History book will attest.

(9) After the end of the war in which he gained such exposure, he moved to the United States to work with his main rival. He developed a method of predicting system reliability which today is considered a law in the field.

(10) He then returned to his home country; working for one of the companies for which he had previously served as a designer. There, he predicted problems with that country’s modifications to a famous fighter aircraft; which was borne out in subsequent years.
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Old 02-13-2014, 09:24 AM
  #9342
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Afternoon clue. Not a lot of suitable clues left. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What famed aviator designer do I describe?

Clues:

(1) He began as a world famous pilot; and won or placed highly in several international competitions.

(2) Then he became an aircraft designer. He began work with a couple of noted aircraft companies, then switched to a newly reconstituted, and famous, company; which already had the services of another pre-eminent designer.

(3) He assisted in the design of a famed commercial airplane; one which was the basis for an iconic aircraft known to all warbird enthusiasts.

(4) Then he became the chief designer for the company, and headed the team of designers working on a new project. This aircraft was not particularly successful in its original role, but was far more successful in follow on uses. It remained in every day use and production for a long time, for the period.

(5) He then moved to another, competitor, company. There he worked on a seminal aircraft which was not to see production; but one which was ground breaking in its design.

(6) He then designed another aircraft. This one, which was initially considered to be too complicated and too filled with innovative ideas, was not put into production. This lead to his being fired by the man “whose name is on the door”; although a simplified version of his design was later put into limited production and considered to be a great aircraft.

(7) After being abruptly fired, he moved to yet another aircraft manufacturer, where he worked on a collaborative effort between the aircraft manufacturer and an engine company. This work lead him into a famous rivalry with a very well known aerospace designer; a rivalry which would last for many years.

(8) Although the ground breaking research and design effort in which he was involved (7) was at first troublesome, he eventually discovered a flaw in the wing design. After correcting that, the design worked; as any modern History book will attest.

(9) After the end of the war in which he gained such exposure, he moved to the United States to work with his main rival. He developed a method of predicting system reliability which today is considered a law in the field.

(10) He then returned to his home country; working for one of the companies for which he had previously served as a designer. There, he predicted problems with that country’s modifications to a famous fighter aircraft; which was borne out in subsequent years.

(11) Strangely enough, one of his more famous inventions came about because of his interest in a sport; and an injury he suffered while practicing the sport. He designed new equipment, which is in common use even today; and started a sports equipment company which was a major manufacturer within its field.
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Old 02-13-2014, 12:45 PM
  #9343
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Late afternoon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What famed aviator designer do I describe?

Clues:

(1) He began as a world famous pilot; and won or placed highly in several international competitions.

(2) Then he became an aircraft designer. He began work with a couple of noted aircraft companies, then switched to a newly reconstituted, and famous, company; which already had the services of another pre-eminent designer.

(3) He assisted in the design of a famed commercial airplane; one which was the basis for an iconic aircraft known to all warbird enthusiasts.

(4) Then he became the chief designer for the company, and headed the team of designers working on a new project. This aircraft was not particularly successful in its original role, but was far more successful in follow on uses. It remained in every day use and production for a long time, for the period.

(5) He then moved to another, competitor, company. There he worked on a seminal aircraft which was not to see production; but one which was ground breaking in its design.

(6) He then designed another aircraft. This one, which was initially considered to be too complicated and too filled with innovative ideas, was not put into production. This lead to his being fired by the man “whose name is on the door”; although a simplified version of his design was later put into limited production and considered to be a great aircraft.

(7) After being abruptly fired, he moved to yet another aircraft manufacturer, where he worked on a collaborative effort between the aircraft manufacturer and an engine company. This work lead him into a famous rivalry with a very well known aerospace designer; a rivalry which would last for many years.

(8) Although the ground breaking research and design effort in which he was involved (7) was at first troublesome, he eventually discovered a flaw in the wing design. After correcting that, the design worked; as any modern History book will attest.

(9) After the end of the war in which he gained such exposure, he moved to the United States to work with his main rival. He developed a method of predicting system reliability which today is considered a law in the field.

(10) He then returned to his home country; working for one of the companies for which he had previously served as a designer. There, he predicted problems with that country’s modifications to a famous fighter aircraft; which was borne out in subsequent years.

(11) Strangely enough, one of his more famous inventions came about because of his interest in a sport; and an injury he suffered while practicing the sport. He designed new equipment, which is in common use even today; and started a sports equipment company which was a major manufacturer within its field.

(12) Oddly (To my mind), I can find no record of his having served in WWI; although he was definitely old enough to have done so.
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Old 02-13-2014, 02:32 PM
  #9344
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Evening clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What famed aviator designer do I describe?

Clues:

(1) He began as a world famous pilot; and won or placed highly in several international competitions.

(2) Then he became an aircraft designer. He began work with a couple of noted aircraft companies, then switched to a newly reconstituted, and famous, company; which already had the services of another pre-eminent designer.

(3) He assisted in the design of a famed commercial airplane; one which was the basis for an iconic aircraft known to all warbird enthusiasts.

(4) Then he became the chief designer for the company, and headed the team of designers working on a new project. This aircraft was not particularly successful in its original role, but was far more successful in follow on uses. It remained in every day use and production for a long time, for the period.

(5) He then moved to another, competitor, company. There he worked on a seminal aircraft which was not to see production; but one which was ground breaking in its design.

(6) He then designed another aircraft. This one, which was initially considered to be too complicated and too filled with innovative ideas, was not put into production. This lead to his being fired by the man “whose name is on the door”; although a simplified version of his design was later put into limited production and considered to be a great aircraft.

(7) After being abruptly fired, he moved to yet another aircraft manufacturer, where he worked on a collaborative effort between the aircraft manufacturer and an engine company. This work lead him into a famous rivalry with a very well known aerospace designer; a rivalry which would last for many years.

(8) Although the ground breaking research and design effort in which he was involved (7) was at first troublesome, he eventually discovered a flaw in the wing design. After correcting that, the design worked; as any modern History book will attest.

(9) After the end of the war in which he gained such exposure, he moved to the United States to work with his main rival. He developed a method of predicting system reliability which today is considered a law in the field.

(10) He then returned to his home country; working for one of the companies for which he had previously served as a designer. There, he predicted problems with that country’s modifications to a famous fighter aircraft; which was borne out in subsequent years.

(11) Strangely enough, one of his more famous inventions came about because of his interest in a sport; and an injury he suffered while practicing the sport. He designed new equipment, which is in common use even today; and started a sports equipment company which was a major manufacturer within its field.

(12) Oddly (To my mind), I can find no record of his having served in WWI; although he was definitely old enough to have done so.

(13) His life and career literally stretched from the dawn of flight and aerial fighting to the genesis of the space age and its greatest accomplishments.
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Old 02-13-2014, 05:24 PM
  #9345
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Things I leaned chasing this question:

Kurt Tank and Willi Messerschmidt were born the same year (1898)

Lancaster designer Roy Chadwick was killed in a crash caused by reversed ailerons

Still don't have the answer though.

Terry
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Old 02-13-2014, 07:30 PM
  #9346
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Redback View Post
Things I leaned chasing this question:

Kurt Tank and Willi Messerschmidt were born the same year (1898)

Lancaster designer Roy Chadwick was killed in a crash caused by reversed ailerons

Still don't have the answer though.

Terry

Redback; you are probably closer to the answer than you think. Keep trying; and here's a late night clue to aid your search. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What famed aviator designer do I describe?

Clues:

(1) He began as a world famous pilot; and won or placed highly in several international competitions.

(2) Then he became an aircraft designer. He began work with a couple of noted aircraft companies, then switched to a newly reconstituted, and famous, company; which already had the services of another pre-eminent designer.

(3) He assisted in the design of a famed commercial airplane; one which was the basis for an iconic aircraft known to all warbird enthusiasts.

(4) Then he became the chief designer for the company, and headed the team of designers working on a new project. This aircraft was not particularly successful in its original role, but was far more successful in follow on uses. It remained in every day use and production for a long time, for the period.

(5) He then moved to another, competitor, company. There he worked on a seminal aircraft which was not to see production; but one which was ground breaking in its design.

(6) He then designed another aircraft. This one, which was initially considered to be too complicated and too filled with innovative ideas, was not put into production. This lead to his being fired by the man “whose name is on the door”; although a simplified version of his design was later put into limited production and considered to be a great aircraft.

(7) After being abruptly fired, he moved to yet another aircraft manufacturer, where he worked on a collaborative effort between the aircraft manufacturer and an engine company. This work lead him into a famous rivalry with a very well known aerospace designer; a rivalry which would last for many years.

(8) Although the ground breaking research and design effort in which he was involved (7) was at first troublesome, he eventually discovered a flaw in the wing design. After correcting that, the design worked; as any modern History book will attest.

(9) After the end of the war in which he gained such exposure, he moved to the United States to work with his main rival. He developed a method of predicting system reliability which today is considered a law in the field.

(10) He then returned to his home country; working for one of the companies for which he had previously served as a designer. There, he predicted problems with that country’s modifications to a famous fighter aircraft; which was borne out in subsequent years.

(11) Strangely enough, one of his more famous inventions came about because of his interest in a sport; and an injury he suffered while practicing the sport. He designed new equipment, which is in common use even today; and started a sports equipment company which was a major manufacturer within its field.

(12) Oddly (To my mind), I can find no record of his having served in WWI; although he was definitely old enough to have done so.

(13) His life and career literally stretched from the dawn of flight and aerial fighting to the genesis of the space age and its greatest accomplishments.

(14) He did a reliability study of adaptations being made to license-built F-104 fighters. The study was initially considered to be alarming; and later prophetic.
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Old 02-13-2014, 08:04 PM
  #9347
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OK Ernie, now I have it (or at least Google and I have it!!!)

Might take a leaf out of your book and let it stew for a bit longer, especially as I don't have a question handy!

Terry

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Old 02-14-2014, 04:42 AM
  #9348
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Redback View Post
OK Ernie, now I have it (or at least Google and I have it!!!)

Might take a leaf out of your book and let it stew for a bit longer, especially as I don't have a question handy!

Terry

Well, I predict some one will post a correct answer today. From here on out the clues will, as they must, become increasingly transparent. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What famed aviator designer do I describe?

Clues:

(1) He began as a world famous pilot; and won or placed highly in several international competitions.

(2) Then he became an aircraft designer. He began work with a couple of noted aircraft companies, then switched to a newly reconstituted, and famous, company; which already had the services of another pre-eminent designer.

(3) He assisted in the design of a famed commercial airplane; one which was the basis for an iconic aircraft known to all warbird enthusiasts.

(4) Then he became the chief designer for the company, and headed the team of designers working on a new project. This aircraft was not particularly successful in its original role, but was far more successful in follow on uses. It remained in every day use and production for a long time, for the period.

(5) He then moved to another, competitor, company. There he worked on a seminal aircraft which was not to see production; but one which was ground breaking in its design.

(6) He then designed another aircraft. This one, which was initially considered to be too complicated and too filled with innovative ideas, was not put into production. This lead to his being fired by the man “whose name is on the door”; although a simplified version of his design was later put into limited production and considered to be a great aircraft.

(7) After being abruptly fired, he moved to yet another aircraft manufacturer, where he worked on a collaborative effort between the aircraft manufacturer and an engine company. This work lead him into a famous rivalry with a very well known aerospace designer; a rivalry which would last for many years.

(8) Although the ground breaking research and design effort in which he was involved (7) was at first troublesome, he eventually discovered a flaw in the wing design. After correcting that, the design worked; as any modern History book will attest.

(9) After the end of the war in which he gained such exposure, he moved to the United States to work with his main rival. He developed a method of predicting system reliability which today is considered a law in the field.

(10) He then returned to his home country; working for one of the companies for which he had previously served as a designer. There, he predicted problems with that country’s modifications to a famous fighter aircraft; which was borne out in subsequent years.

(11) Strangely enough, one of his more famous inventions came about because of his interest in a sport; and an injury he suffered while practicing the sport. He designed new equipment, which is in common use even today; and started a sports equipment company which was a major manufacturer within its field.

(12) Oddly (To my mind), I can find no record of his having served in WWI; although he was definitely old enough to have done so.

(13) His life and career literally stretched from the dawn of flight and aerial fighting to the genesis of the space age and its greatest accomplishments.

(14) He did a reliability study of adaptations being made to license-built F-104 fighters. The study was initially considered to be alarming; and later prophetic.

(15) After his stint as a competitive aviator, he worked with the Klemm Light Aircraft Company. Then he moved to Heinkel.
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Old 02-14-2014, 11:45 AM
  #9349
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I suspect more than one of you already know the answer; but here is an afternoon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What famed aviator designer do I describe?

Clues:

(1) He began as a world famous pilot; and won or placed highly in several international competitions.

(2) Then he became an aircraft designer. He began work with a couple of noted aircraft companies, then switched to a newly reconstituted, and famous, company; which already had the services of another pre-eminent designer.

(3) He assisted in the design of a famed commercial airplane; one which was the basis for an iconic aircraft known to all warbird enthusiasts.

(4) Then he became the chief designer for the company, and headed the team of designers working on a new project. This aircraft was not particularly successful in its original role, but was far more successful in follow on uses. It remained in every day use and production for a long time, for the period.

(5) He then moved to another, competitor, company. There he worked on a seminal aircraft which was not to see production; but one which was ground breaking in its design.

(6) He then designed another aircraft. This one, which was initially considered to be too complicated and too filled with innovative ideas, was not put into production. This lead to his being fired by the man “whose name is on the door”; although a simplified version of his design was later put into limited production and considered to be a great aircraft.

(7) After being abruptly fired, he moved to yet another aircraft manufacturer, where he worked on a collaborative effort between the aircraft manufacturer and an engine company. This work lead him into a famous rivalry with a very well known aerospace designer; a rivalry which would last for many years.

(8) Although the ground breaking research and design effort in which he was involved (7) was at first troublesome, he eventually discovered a flaw in the wing design. After correcting that, the design worked; as any modern History book will attest.

(9) After the end of the war in which he gained such exposure, he moved to the United States to work with his main rival. He developed a method of predicting system reliability which today is considered a law in the field.

(10) He then returned to his home country; working for one of the companies for which he had previously served as a designer. There, he predicted problems with that country’s modifications to a famous fighter aircraft; which was borne out in subsequent years.

(11) Strangely enough, one of his more famous inventions came about because of his interest in a sport; and an injury he suffered while practicing the sport. He designed new equipment, which is in common use even today; and started a sports equipment company which was a major manufacturer within its field.

(12) Oddly (To my mind), I can find no record of his having served in WWI; although he was definitely old enough to have done so.

(13) His life and career literally stretched from the dawn of flight and aerial fighting to the genesis of the space age and its greatest accomplishments.

(14) He did a reliability study of adaptations being made to license-built F-104 fighters. The study was initially considered to be alarming; and later prophetic.

(15) After his stint as a competitive aviator, he worked with the Klemm Light Aircraft Company. Then he moved to Heinkel.

(16) From there, he moved to the Bavarian Aircraft Works before returning to Heinkel.
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Old 02-14-2014, 02:01 PM
  #9350
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Evening clue. After this, the clues will become more and more obvious. I'm leaving for a week's travel tomorrow morning, so some one will have to take over. But then again, I can't keep you guys outfoxed for much longer. Thanks; Ernie P.


Question: What famed aviator designer do I describe?

Clues:

(1) He began as a world famous pilot; and won or placed highly in several international competitions.

(2) Then he became an aircraft designer. He began work with a couple of noted aircraft companies, then switched to a newly reconstituted, and famous, company; which already had the services of another pre-eminent designer.

(3) He assisted in the design of a famed commercial airplane; one which was the basis for an iconic aircraft known to all warbird enthusiasts.

(4) Then he became the chief designer for the company, and headed the team of designers working on a new project. This aircraft was not particularly successful in its original role, but was far more successful in follow on uses. It remained in every day use and production for a long time, for the period.

(5) He then moved to another, competitor, company. There he worked on a seminal aircraft which was not to see production; but one which was ground breaking in its design.

(6) He then designed another aircraft. This one, which was initially considered to be too complicated and too filled with innovative ideas, was not put into production. This lead to his being fired by the man “whose name is on the door”; although a simplified version of his design was later put into limited production and considered to be a great aircraft.

(7) After being abruptly fired, he moved to yet another aircraft manufacturer, where he worked on a collaborative effort between the aircraft manufacturer and an engine company. This work lead him into a famous rivalry with a very well known aerospace designer; a rivalry which would last for many years.

(8) Although the ground breaking research and design effort in which he was involved (7) was at first troublesome, he eventually discovered a flaw in the wing design. After correcting that, the design worked; as any modern History book will attest.

(9) After the end of the war in which he gained such exposure, he moved to the United States to work with his main rival. He developed a method of predicting system reliability which today is considered a law in the field.

(10) He then returned to his home country; working for one of the companies for which he had previously served as a designer. There, he predicted problems with that country’s modifications to a famous fighter aircraft; which was borne out in subsequent years.

(11) Strangely enough, one of his more famous inventions came about because of his interest in a sport; and an injury he suffered while practicing the sport. He designed new equipment, which is in common use even today; and started a sports equipment company which was a major manufacturer within its field.

(12) Oddly (To my mind), I can find no record of his having served in WWI; although he was definitely old enough to have done so.

(13) His life and career literally stretched from the dawn of flight and aerial fighting to the genesis of the space age and its greatest accomplishments.

(14) He did a reliability study of adaptations being made to license-built F-104 fighters. The study was initially considered to be alarming; and later prophetic.

(15) After his stint as a competitive aviator, he worked with the Klemm Light Aircraft Company. Then he moved to Heinkel.

(16) From there, he moved to the Bavarian Aircraft Works before returning to Heinkel.

(17) From there, he moved to Fieseler.
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