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  1. #9401

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    clarke comes to mind first. maybe goddard
    \"any crash you can walk away from is a good crash\" Launch pad Mcquack

  2. #9402

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    Quote Originally Posted by psb667 View Post
    clarke comes to mind first. maybe goddard

    Neither is correct. This designer produced a famous warbird, remember. But then again, you may be closer than might first appear. Perhaps this next clue will help. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What famed aviator designer do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) He is considered to be, at minimum, a genius.

    (2) He designed one of the deadliest aircraft to fight in a major conflict.

    (3) The above (2) despite working exclusively in the aircraft industry for a relatively short period of time.

    (4) He left industry to become first an assistant, and then a full, professor in a college.

    (5) He had a very wide range of interests, which ranged from ball games to musical instruments to philosophy.

    (6) He was a noted and prolific author; and usually a best selling one.

    (7) The aircraft he designed was often mistaken for another of the same nation; and, in fact, was often compared to the other even when its identity was known.

  3. #9403

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    Evening clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What famed aviator designer do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) He is considered to be, at minimum, a genius.

    (2) He designed one of the deadliest aircraft to fight in a major conflict.

    (3) The above (2) despite working exclusively in the aircraft industry for a relatively short period of time.

    (4) He left industry to become first an assistant, and then a full, professor in a college.

    (5) He had a very wide range of interests, which ranged from ball games to musical instruments to philosophy.

    (6) He was a noted and prolific author; and usually a best selling one.

    (7) The aircraft he designed was often mistaken for another of the same nation; and, in fact, was often compared to the other even when its identity was known.

    (8) His name was in the international news toward the end of the last century; and, indeed, within the past five years.

  4. #9404
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    Oops, hit wrong button!

  5. #9405

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    Morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What famed aviator designer do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) He is considered to be, at minimum, a genius.

    (2) He designed one of the deadliest aircraft to fight in a major conflict.

    (3) The above (2) despite working exclusively in the aircraft industry for a relatively short period of time.

    (4) He left industry to become first an assistant, and then a full, professor in a college.

    (5) He had a very wide range of interests, which ranged from ball games to musical instruments to philosophy.

    (6) He was a noted and prolific author; and usually a best selling one.

    (7) The aircraft he designed was often mistaken for another of the same nation; and, in fact, was often compared to the other even when its identity was known.

    (8) His name was in the international news toward the end of the last century; and, indeed, within the past five years.

    (9) The aircraft he designed was noted for being exceptionally maneuverable.

  6. #9406

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    Jiro Horikoshi?


  7. #9407

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyS View Post
    Jiro Horikoshi?

    No JohnnyS; not the designer of the famous Japanese Zero (Codename Zeke). But here's a bonus clue to assist your search. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What famed aviator designer do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) He is considered to be, at minimum, a genius.

    (2) He designed one of the deadliest aircraft to fight in a major conflict.

    (3) The above (2) despite working exclusively in the aircraft industry for a relatively short period of time.

    (4) He left industry to become first an assistant, and then a full, professor in a college.

    (5) He had a very wide range of interests, which ranged from ball games to musical instruments to philosophy.

    (6) He was a noted and prolific author; and usually a best selling one.

    (7) The aircraft he designed was often mistaken for another of the same nation; and, in fact, was often compared to the other even when its identity was known.

    (8) His name was in the international news toward the end of the last century; and, indeed, within the past five years.

    (9) The aircraft he designed was noted for being exceptionally maneuverable.

    (10) But he is now best known for another endeavor.

  8. #9408

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    Afternoon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What famed aviator designer do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) He is considered to be, at minimum, a genius.

    (2) He designed one of the deadliest aircraft to fight in a major conflict.

    (3) The above (2) despite working exclusively in the aircraft industry for a relatively short period of time.

    (4) He left industry to become first an assistant, and then a full, professor in a college.

    (5) He had a very wide range of interests, which ranged from ball games to musical instruments to philosophy.

    (6) He was a noted and prolific author; and usually a best selling one.

    (7) The aircraft he designed was often mistaken for another of the same nation; and, in fact, was often compared to the other even when its identity was known.

    (8) His name was in the international news toward the end of the last century; and, indeed, within the past five years.

    (9) The aircraft he designed was noted for being exceptionally maneuverable.

    (10) But he is now best known for another endeavor.

    (11) He also excelled with musical instruments; playing a variety of them.

  9. #9409

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    Evening clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What famed aviator designer do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) He is considered to be, at minimum, a genius.

    (2) He designed one of the deadliest aircraft to fight in a major conflict.

    (3) The above (2) despite working exclusively in the aircraft industry for a relatively short period of time.

    (4) He left industry to become first an assistant, and then a full, professor in a college.

    (5) He had a very wide range of interests, which ranged from ball games to musical instruments to philosophy.

    (6) He was a noted and prolific author; and usually a best selling one.

    (7) The aircraft he designed was often mistaken for another of the same nation; and, in fact, was often compared to the other even when its identity was known.

    (8) His name was in the international news toward the end of the last century; and, indeed, within the past five years.

    (9) The aircraft he designed was noted for being exceptionally maneuverable.

    (10) But he is now best known for another endeavor.

    (11) He also excelled with musical instruments; playing a variety of them.

    (12) Around 6,000 of the aircraft in (2) were built.

  10. #9410

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    Early morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What famed aviator designer do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) He is considered to be, at minimum, a genius.

    (2) He designed one of the deadliest aircraft to fight in a major conflict.

    (3) The above (2) despite working exclusively in the aircraft industry for a relatively short period of time.

    (4) He left industry to become first an assistant, and then a full, professor in a college.

    (5) He had a very wide range of interests, which ranged from ball games to musical instruments to philosophy.

    (6) He was a noted and prolific author; and usually a best selling one.

    (7) The aircraft he designed was often mistaken for another of the same nation; and, in fact, was often compared to the other even when its identity was known.

    (8) His name was in the international news toward the end of the last century; and, indeed, within the past five years.

    (9) The aircraft he designed was noted for being exceptionally maneuverable.

    (10) But he is now best known for another endeavor.

    (11) He also excelled with musical instruments; playing a variety of them.

    (12) Around 6,000 of the aircraft in (2) were built.

    (13) From the study of brain waves to baton twirling, his interests were widespread. In school, he dedicated himself to studying many different subjects, and still skipped grades.

  11. #9411

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    Afternoon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What famed aviator designer do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) He is considered to be, at minimum, a genius.

    (2) He designed one of the deadliest aircraft to fight in a major conflict.

    (3) The above (2) despite working exclusively in the aircraft industry for a relatively short period of time.

    (4) He left industry to become first an assistant, and then a full, professor in a college.

    (5) He had a very wide range of interests, which ranged from ball games to musical instruments to philosophy.

    (6) He was a noted and prolific author; and usually a best selling one.

    (7) The aircraft he designed was often mistaken for another of the same nation; and, in fact, was often compared to the other even when its identity was known.

    (8) His name was in the international news toward the end of the last century; and, indeed, within the past five years.

    (9) The aircraft he designed was noted for being exceptionally maneuverable.

    (10) But he is now best known for another endeavor.

    (11) He also excelled with musical instruments; playing a variety of them.

    (12) Around 6,000 of the aircraft in (2) were built.

    (13) From the study of brain waves to baton twirling, his interests were widespread. In school, he dedicated himself to studying many different subjects, and still skipped grades.

    (14) In the 1950’s, he even got involved in rocketry.

  12. #9412

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    Evening clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What famed aviator designer do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) He is considered to be, at minimum, a genius.

    (2) He designed one of the deadliest aircraft to fight in a major conflict.

    (3) The above (2) despite working exclusively in the aircraft industry for a relatively short period of time.

    (4) He left industry to become first an assistant, and then a full, professor in a college.

    (5) He had a very wide range of interests, which ranged from ball games to musical instruments to philosophy.

    (6) He was a noted and prolific author; and usually a best selling one.

    (7) The aircraft he designed was often mistaken for another of the same nation; and, in fact, was often compared to the other even when its identity was known.

    (8) His name was in the international news toward the end of the last century; and, indeed, within the past five years.

    (9) The aircraft he designed was noted for being exceptionally maneuverable.

    (10) But he is now best known for another endeavor.

    (11) He also excelled with musical instruments; playing a variety of them.

    (12) Around 6,000 of the aircraft in (2) were built.

    (13) From the study of brain waves to baton twirling, his interests were widespread. In school, he dedicated himself to studying many different subjects, and still skipped grades.

    (14) In the 1950’s, he even got involved in rocketry.

    (15) He studied Mah Jong, English plays and philosophy.

  13. #9413

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    Hideo Itokawa?


  14. #9414
    Redback's Avatar
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    Thank goodness! Been bashing my brains out on this one!

    Fit is too good to be wrong!

    Terry

  15. #9415

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    It was the Mah Jong reference. That finally gave me enough Google-fu to find it...

  16. #9416

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyS View Post
    Hideo Itokawa?
    Yeah, I guess there haven't been all that many aircraft designers and true geniuses who were college professors, played multiple musical instruments, and were into rocketry, brain waves, baton twirling, ball games, English plays, philosophy and Mah Jong. I figured one of you sharpshooters would pick up on the Mah Jong thing, but couldn't leave it out. Somehow, my reference to the Zero (Zeke) and the Ki-43 (Oscar) Itokawa designed being called "the Army Zero" escaped detection. His being called the father of Japanese rocketry would have given it away immediately, I'm sure. The Oscar was the top scoring Japanese aircraft of WWII. Good job, JohnnyS; and you are up. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What famed aviator designer do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) He is considered to be, at minimum, a genius.

    (2) He designed one of the deadliest aircraft to fight in a major conflict.

    (3) The above (2) despite working exclusively in the aircraft industry for a relatively short period of time.

    (4) He left industry to become first an assistant, and then a full, professor in a college.

    (5) He had a very wide range of interests, which ranged from ball games to musical instruments to philosophy.

    (6) He was a noted and prolific author; and usually a best selling one.

    (7) The aircraft he designed was often mistaken for another of the same nation; and, in fact, was often compared to the other even when its identity was known.

    (8) His name was in the international news toward the end of the last century; and, indeed, within the past five years.

    (9) The aircraft he designed was noted for being exceptionally maneuverable.

    (10) But he is now best known for another endeavor.

    (11) He also excelled with musical instruments; playing a variety of them.

    (12) Around 6,000 of the aircraft in (2) were built.

    (13) From the study of brain waves to baton twirling, his interests were widespread. In school, he dedicated himself to studying many different subjects, and still skipped grades.

    (14) In the 1950’s, he even got involved in rocketry.

    (15) He studied Mah Jong, English plays and philosophy.

    (16) He left the university professorship and founded an institute.

    (17) After his death, of the things named for him, some are literally out of this world.

    Answer: Hideo Itokawa

    The Nakajima Ki-43 Hayabusa (隼, "Peregrine Falcon") was a single-engine land-based tactical fighter used by the Imperial Japanese Army Air Force in World War II. The army designation was "Army Type 1 Fighter" (一式戦闘機); the Allied reporting name was "Oscar", but it was often called the "Army Zero" by American pilots for its resemblance to the Mitsubishi A6M Zero, which was flown by the Japanese Navy.

    Like the A6M, the radial-engined Ki-43 was light and easy to fly, and became legendary for its combat performance in East Asia in the early years of the war. It could outmaneuver any opponent, but did not have armor or self-sealing tanks, and its armament was poor until the last version, which was produced as late as 1944. Allied pilots often reported that the nimble Ki-43s were difficult targets, but burned easily or broke apart with few hits. In spite of its drawbacks, the Ki-43 shot down more Allied aircraft than any other Japanese fighter and almost all the JAAF'S aces achieved most of their kills in it.

    Total production amounted to 5,919 aircraft. Many of these were used during the last months of the war for kamikaze missions against the American fleet.

    The Ki-43 was designed by Hideo Itokawa, who would later become famous as a pioneer of Japanese rocketry. The Ki-43 prototype was produced in response to a December 1937 specification for a successor to the popular fixed-gear Nakajima Ki-27 Nate. The specification called for a top speed of 500 km/h (311 mph), a climb rate of 5,000 m (16,400 ft) in five minutes and a range of 800 km (500 mi). Maneuverability was to be at least good as the Ki-27.



    Hideo Itokawa (糸川 英夫, Itokawa Hideo?, July 20, 1912 – February 21, 1999) was a pioneer of Japanese rocketry and of the Japanese space program. In Japan, he was popularly known as Dr. Rocket, and he has been described in the media as the father of Japanese space development.

    The asteroid 25143 Itokawa, named in honor of Itokawa, is notable as the target of the Hayabusa mission.


    Born in Tokyo, he graduated from the Tokyo Imperial University in 1935, having majored in aeronautical engineering. During World War II, he was involved in designing aircraft at the Nakajima Aircraft Company and designed the Nakajima Ki-43 Hayabusa "Oscar" fighter.

    In 1941, he became an assistant professor of the Imperial University of Tokyo, and became a professor in 1948. He retired from his post in 1967 and established an institute.

    In 1955 Itokawa worked on the Pencil Rocket for Japan's space program.

    Itokawa was a genius who skipped grades in school and studied many topics. He wrote 49 books, and was, many times, a best-selling author.

    Topics that Itokawa became interested in or took as a hobby, include such sports as basketball, golf and swimming, as well as orchestral arrangements and such instruments as cello, harmonica, organ, piano, violin and taishōgoto (a string instrument invented in Japan). He was also interested in baton twirling, brain waves, English plays, Mah Jong, philosophy, rocket engineering and novel writing.

    Hayabusa (はやぶさ?, literally "Peregrine Falcon") was an unmanned spacecraft developed by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) to return a sample of material from a small near-Earth asteroid named 25143 Itokawa to Earth for further analysis.

    Hayabusa, formerly known as MUSES-C for Mu Space Engineering Spacecraft C, was launched on 9 May 2003 and rendezvoused with Itokawa in mid-September 2005. After arriving at Itokawa, Hayabusa studied the asteroid's shape, spin, topography, colour, composition, density, and history. In November 2005, it landed on the asteroid and collected samples in the form of tiny grains of asteroidal material, which were returned to Earth aboard the spacecraft on 13 June 2010.

    The spacecraft also carried a detachable minilander, MINERVA, which failed to reach the surface.

  17. #9417

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    OK, here goes:

    1. Crew of 1.
    2. Never went into production: Prototypes only.
    3. Designed to be operated by military personnel with very little training, although this was not achieved.
    4. Designed for reconnaissance.

  18. #9418

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyS View Post


    OK, here goes:

    1. Crew of 1.
    2. Never went into production: Prototypes only.
    3. Designed to be operated by military personnel with very little training, although this was not achieved.
    4. Designed for reconnaissance.

    I can't resist longshots. The Goodyear Inflatoplane? Thanks; Ernie P.


    The Goodyear Inflatoplane was an experimental aircraft made by the Goodyear Aircraft Company, a subsidiary of Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company, well known for the Goodyear blimp. Although it seemed an improbable project, the finished aircraft proved to be capable of meeting its design objectives although its sponsor, the United States Army, ultimately cancelled the project when it could not find a "valid military use for an aircraft that could be brought down by a well-aimed bow and arrow."

    The original concept of an all-fabric inflatable aircraft was based on Taylor McDaniel inflatable rubber glider experiments in 1931. Designed and built in only 12 weeks, the Goodyear Inflatoplane was built in 1956, with the idea that it could be used by the military as a rescue plane to be dropped in a hardened container behind enemy lines. The 44 cubic ft (1.25 cubic meter) container could also be transported by truck, jeep trailer or aircraft. The inflatable surface of this aircraft was actually a sandwich of two rubber-type materials connected by a mesh of nylon threads, forming an I-beam. When the nylon was exposed to air, it absorbed and repelled water as it stiffened, giving the aircraft its shape and rigidity. Structural integrity was retained in flight with forced air being continually circulated by the aircraft's motor.



    Goodyear inflatoplane on display at the Smithsonian Institution

    There were at least two versions: The GA-468 was a single-seater. It took about five minutes to inflate to about 25 psi (170 kPa); at full size, it was 19 ft 7 in (5.97 m) long, with a 22 ft (6.7 m) wingspan. A pilot would then hand-start the two-stroke cycle,[2] 40 horsepower (30 kW) Nelson engine, and takeoff with a maximum load of 240 pounds (110 kg). On 20 US gallons (76 L) of fuel, the aircraft could fly 390 miles (630 km), with an endurance of 6.5 hours. Maximum speed was 72 miles per hour (116 km/h), with a cruise speed of 60 mph. Later, a 42 horsepower (31 kW) engine was used in the aircraft.

    Takeoff from turf was in 250 feet with 575 feet needed to clear a 50 foot obstacle. It landed in 350 feet. Rate of climb was 550 feet per minute. Its service ceiling was estimated at 10,000 ft.

    The GA-466 was the two-seater version, 2 in (51 mm) shorter, but with a 6 ft (1.8 m) longer wingspan than the GA-468. A more powerful 60 horsepower (45 kW) McCulloch 4318 engine could power the 740 pounds (340 kg) of plane and passenger to 70 miles per hour (110 km/h), although the range of the plane was limited to 275 miles (443 km).

    The test program at Goodyear's facilities near Wingfoot Lake, Akron, Ohio showed that the inflation could be accomplished with as little as 8 psi (544 mbar), less than a car tire. The flight test program had a fatal crash when Army aviator Lt. "Pug" Wallace was killed. The aircraft was in a descending turn when one of the control cables under the wing came off the pulley and was wedged in the pulley bracket, locking the stick. The turn tightened until one of the wings folded up over the prop and was chopped up. With the wings flapping because of loss of air, one of the aluminum wing tip skids hit the pilot alongside the head, as was clear from marks on his helmet. Wallace was pitched out over the nose of the aircraft and fell into the shallow lake. His chute never opened. He may have been knocked unconscious and rendered unable to open it. Only 12 Goodyear Inflatoplanes were built, but development continued until the project was cancelled in 1973.

    Goodyear donated two Inflatoplanes for museum display at the end of the project, one to the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia and one to the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.

  19. #9419

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    Nope, not the inflatoplane!

    Another clue:

    1. Crew of 1.
    2. Never went into production: Prototypes only.
    3. Designed to be operated by military personnel with very little training, although this was not achieved.
    4. Designed for reconnaissance.
    5. It had an outboard motor.

  20. #9420
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    The take off is optional, but the landing is MANDATORY!!
    RCU Forum Manager
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  21. #9421

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    No, not the Canberra.

    Another clue:

    1. Crew of 1.
    2. Never went into production: Prototypes only.
    3. Designed to be operated by military personnel with very little training, although this was not achieved.
    4. Designed for reconnaissance.
    5. It had an outboard motor.
    6. Seriously, it had an OUTBOARD MOTOR!

  22. #9422

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyS View Post
    No, not the Canberra.

    Another clue:

    1. Crew of 1.
    2. Never went into production: Prototypes only.
    3. Designed to be operated by military personnel with very little training, although this was not achieved.
    4. Designed for reconnaissance.
    5. It had an outboard motor.
    6. Seriously, it had an OUTBOARD MOTOR!

    While there have been a number of aircraft powered with outboard motors, to include the early production by the Johnson Brothers around 1910, and many others with outboard motors powering ancillary equipment, I'm guessing you refer to the HZ-1 Aerocycle. Thanks; Ernie P.


    The HZ-1 Aerocycle, also known as the YHO-2 and by the manufacturer's designation DH-4 Heli-Vector, was an American one-man "personal helicopter" developed by de Lackner Helicopters in the mid-1950s. Intended to be operated by inexperienced pilots with a minimum of 20 minutes of instruction, the HZ-1 was expected to become a standard reconnaissance machine with the United States Army. Although early testing showed that the craft had promise for providing mobility on the atomic battlefield, more extensive evaluation proved that the aircraft was in fact too difficult to control for operation by untrained infantrymen, and after a pair of crashes the project was abandoned. A single model of the craft was put on display.

    During the early 1950s, Charles H. Zimmerman of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) developed a system for control of a rotorcraft in which, with the rotors mounted on the underside of the aircraft, the machine could be steered by the pilot through the simple shifting of his weight, and kept stable through the actions of his natural reflexes. Known as kinesthetic control, and similar in principle to the mechanics of riding a bicycle or a surfboard, it was hoped that the concept would allow for pilots to operate an aircraft with little to no training time. NACA testing proved that the idea had merit, and several companies, including Bensen Aircraft, Hiller Aircraft, and de Lackner Helicopters, began development of rotorcraft using the concept.

    The concept proposed by de Lackner Helicopters was a one-man flying platform, and it received the company designation "DH-4". The DH-4 was expected to be able to carry up to 120 pounds (54 kg) of cargo or an auxiliary 5-US-gallon (19 l; 4.2 imp gal) fuel tank to extend its range up to 50 miles (80 km) in addition to its pilot; in addition, a cargo lifting line could be threaded through the rotor shaft for the carrying of slung loads underneath the craft.

    The machine was a simple, cross-shaped frame, with the pilot standing on a platform, secured by a safety harness. The harness also secured the aircraft's engine, which was an outboard motor manufactured by Mercury Marine. The engine was controlled by a twist-grip motorcycle-style throttle and transferred power to the 15-foot (4.6 m) diameter, contra-rotating rotors via belt drive with a chain reduction unit. The aircraft's landing gear consisted of airbags at the end of each arm of the frame along with a large rubber float in the middle, allowing for amphibious capability, although this arrangement was later replaced by a pair of conventional helicopter-type skids.

    Originally designated YHO-2 by the U.S. Army, then later re-designated HZ-1 and named "Aerocycle", the prototype made its first tethered flight on 22 November 1954, with its first free flight taking place in January 1955 at the Brooklyn Army Terminal.[2] Over 160 flights totaling more than 15 hours of flight time were conducted, and the results of this early test flight program were considered promising enough that a dozen examples of the type were ordered (serial numbers 56-6928 to 56-6939). Predictions were made that the craft could provide transport to a modern version of the old horse cavalry, providing airborne "eyes and ears" for the Army.

    In 1956, the test program was transferred to Fort Eustis, Virginia, where Captain Selmer Sundby took over test-flying duties. The HZ-1 had been designed to be very easy to fly, and early testing indicated that untrained soldiers could learn to operate the craft in less than 20 minutes, and some claiming that only five minutes of instruction were required. In addition, the HZ-1 proved to be faster than other flying platform designs evaluated by the Army. Sundby, however, quickly determined that the craft was much more difficult to fly than had been expected, and would not be safe in the hands of an inexperienced pilot. In addition, the low-mounted rotors proved to be prone to kicking up small rocks and other debris.

    Over a series of tethered and free-flying test flights lasting up to 43 minutes, the HZ-1 suffered a pair of accidents. Both crashes occurred under similar conditions – the contra-rotating rotors intermeshed and collided, the blades shattering, causing an immediate loss of control resulting in a crash. Aerodynamic testing was conducted in the full-scale wind tunnel at the Langley Research Center, and it was discovered that the Aerocycle's forwards speed was limited by an uncontrollable pitching motion, but rotor-tip clearance was always sufficient. The inability to determine the precise cause of the intermeshing, combined with the fact that the "personal lifting device" concept was failing to live up to its expectations, led to the decision to terminate the project.

    Sundby was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for his test-flying work with the HZ-1, going on to test-fly the H-21 and H-34 helicopters, as well as seeing combat in the Vietnam War before retiring with the rank of colonel.

  23. #9423

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    And Ernie has it right!!

    So far this month I have had the privilege of providing the following clues for a couple of different aircraft: "Mama Mia! Atsa spicy meatball!!" and "Seriously, it had an OUTBOARD MOTOR!"

    This is FUN!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyS View Post
    And Ernie has it right!!

    So far this month I have had the privilege of providing the following clues for a couple of different aircraft: "Mama Mia! Atsa spicy meatball!!" and "Seriously, it had an OUTBOARD MOTOR!"

    This is FUN!!!

    Thank you, JohnnyS and glad you're enjoying the ride. Your question was excellent, and I apologize for jumping on it so fast. I have good intentions of laying back a bit, but I am very weak willed. Since I will be away overnight, I'll drop several clues quickly. Since the men are always more interesting than the machines.... Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What famed pilot do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) Justifiably famous, even today, for his exploits, he was on top of the heap at the time of his death.

    (2) Noted for being insubordinate and impossible to control; following orders only if he felt like it.

  25. #9425
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    WAG..
    Richard Bong...
    Jim Buzzeo AMA 74894
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