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  1. #9901

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    Afternoon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What warbird do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) It was the first of its kind for the country which built it; and the first to perform a feat which is, today, not only commonplace, but essential.

    (2) It was also the first of its kind for a group of allies.

    (3) It was recognized fairly early on that this aircraft would have a short lifespan; but it was put pressed into service to bridge a gap until newer and better aircraft could be readied for production.

  2. #9902

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    Evening clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What warbird do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) It was the first of its kind for the country which built it; and the first to perform a feat which is, today, not only commonplace, but essential.

    (2) It was also the first of its kind for a group of allies.

    (3) It was recognized fairly early on that this aircraft would have a short lifespan; but it was put pressed into service to bridge a gap until newer and better aircraft could be readied for production.

    (4) It began life when concern began to grow over new enemy aircraft being introduced.

  3. #9903

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    The Gloster Meteor?

  4. #9904

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    Quote Originally Posted by SimonCraig1 View Post
    The Gloster Meteor?

    No, not the Meteor. Right logic, though. Keep trying and you'll get it. Thanks; Ernie P.

  5. #9905

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    A valuable morning clue for you. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What warbird do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) It was the first of its kind for the country which built it; and the first to perform a feat which is, today, not only commonplace, but essential.

    (2) It was also the first of its kind for a group of allies.

    (3) It was recognized fairly early on that this aircraft would have a short lifespan; but it was put pressed into service to bridge a gap until newer and better aircraft could be readied for production.

    (4) It began life when concern began to grow over new enemy aircraft being introduced.

    (5) After conflict broke out, the aircraft began to prove its value in multiple roles; although continual problems with the engines, and other minor problems continued.

  6. #9906

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    Afternoon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What warbird do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) It was the first of its kind for the country which built it; and the first to perform a feat which is, today, not only commonplace, but essential.

    (2) It was also the first of its kind for a group of allies.

    (3) It was recognized fairly early on that this aircraft would have a short lifespan; but it was put pressed into service to bridge a gap until newer and better aircraft could be readied for production.

    (4) It began life when concern began to grow over new enemy aircraft being introduced.

    (5) After conflict broke out, the aircraft began to prove its value in multiple roles; although continual problems with the engines, and other minor problems continued.

    (6) At the same time, new technology breakthroughs allowed the aircraft to assume a new role; one previously reserved to other, larger aircraft. Its value in this new role was considered to be crucial.

  7. #9907
    Redback's Avatar
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    Thinking hard, so far failing dismally!

    Terry

  8. #9908

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    Quote Originally Posted by Redback View Post
    Thinking hard, so far failing dismally!

    Terry

    Keep thinking, Terry; you can figure this one out. Maybe an evening clue will help. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What warbird do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) It was the first of its kind for the country which built it; and the first to perform a feat which is, today, not only commonplace, but essential.

    (2) It was also the first of its kind for a group of allies.

    (3) It was recognized fairly early on that this aircraft would have a short lifespan; but it was put pressed into service to bridge a gap until newer and better aircraft could be readied for production.

    (4) It began life when concern began to grow over new enemy aircraft being introduced.

    (5) After conflict broke out, the aircraft began to prove its value in multiple roles; although continual problems with the engines, and other minor problems continued.

    (6) At the same time, new technology breakthroughs allowed the aircraft to assume a new role; one previously reserved to other, larger aircraft. Its value in this new role was considered to be crucial.

    (7) Enemy defenses in the conflict forced the aircraft into a night role. Despite the limited number of airframes available, its value was obvious.

  9. #9909

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    Fairey Battle?

  10. #9910

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyS View Post
    Fairey Battle?

    No, JohnnyS; not the Fairey Battle; but this morning clue may help. Again, your logic is leading you in the right direction. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What warbird do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) It was the first of its kind for the country which built it; and the first to perform a feat which is, today, not only commonplace, but essential.

    (2) It was also the first of its kind for a group of allies.

    (3) It was recognized fairly early on that this aircraft would have a short lifespan; but it was put pressed into service to bridge a gap until newer and better aircraft could be readied for production.

    (4) It began life when concern began to grow over new enemy aircraft being introduced.

    (5) After conflict broke out, the aircraft began to prove its value in multiple roles; although continual problems with the engines, and other minor problems continued.

    (6) At the same time, new technology breakthroughs allowed the aircraft to assume a new role; one previously reserved to other, larger aircraft. Its value in this new role was considered to be crucial.

    (7) Enemy defenses in the conflict forced the aircraft into a night role. Despite the limited number of airframes available, its value was obvious.

    (8) At the same time, the aircraft was made available to another friendly nation.

  11. #9911

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    Royal Aircraft Factory F.E.2?

    Apparently the first allied fighter able to fire its machine gun forward. Introduced in response to the "Fokker scourge" as a stopgap until a synchronized machine gun that could fire through the prop, like what the Germans had, could be developed.

    Just a guess, inspired somewhat by a suspicion that Ernie has once again lured us into thinking about the wrong war. I am shocked, shocked, that anyone would do such a thing!
    Al Gunn
    Ultra Sport Brotherhood No. 9

  12. #9912

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    Quote Originally Posted by Top_Gunn View Post
    Royal Aircraft Factory F.E.2?

    Apparently the first allied fighter able to fire its machine gun forward. Introduced in response to the "Fokker scourge" as a stopgap until a synchronized machine gun that could fire through the prop, like what the Germans had, could be developed.

    Just a guess, inspired somewhat by a suspicion that Ernie has once again lured us into thinking about the wrong war. I am shocked, shocked, that anyone would do such a thing!

    Wrong answer, Al; but you are correct in one respect. I have to admit, I am a shocking person.... but a really nice one in some other respects. Here's an afternoon clue to set you thinking. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What warbird do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) It was the first of its kind for the country which built it; and the first to perform a feat which is, today, not only commonplace, but essential.

    (2) It was also the first of its kind for a group of allies.

    (3) It was recognized fairly early on that this aircraft would have a short lifespan; but it was put pressed into service to bridge a gap until newer and better aircraft could be readied for production.

    (4) It began life when concern began to grow over new enemy aircraft being introduced.

    (5) After conflict broke out, the aircraft began to prove its value in multiple roles; although continual problems with the engines, and other minor problems continued.

    (6) At the same time, new technology breakthroughs allowed the aircraft to assume a new role; one previously reserved to other, larger aircraft. Its value in this new role was considered to be crucial.

    (7) Enemy defenses in the conflict forced the aircraft into a night role. Despite the limited number of airframes available, its value was obvious.

    (8) At the same time, the aircraft was made available to another friendly nation.

    (9) During the same period, the aircraft began to prove its worth in its new role. Additional fuel tanks and another on-board aircraft system increased its capabilities.

  13. #9913

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    Evening clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What warbird do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) It was the first of its kind for the country which built it; and the first to perform a feat which is, today, not only commonplace, but essential.

    (2) It was also the first of its kind for a group of allies.

    (3) It was recognized fairly early on that this aircraft would have a short lifespan; but it was put pressed into service to bridge a gap until newer and better aircraft could be readied for production.

    (4) It began life when concern began to grow over new enemy aircraft being introduced.

    (5) After conflict broke out, the aircraft began to prove its value in multiple roles; although continual problems with the engines, and other minor problems continued.

    (6) At the same time, new technology breakthroughs allowed the aircraft to assume a new role; one previously reserved to other, larger aircraft. Its value in this new role was considered to be crucial.

    (7) Enemy defenses in the conflict forced the aircraft into a night role. Despite the limited number of airframes available, its value was obvious.

    (8) At the same time, the aircraft was made available to another friendly nation.

    (9) During the same period, the aircraft began to prove its worth in its new role. Additional fuel tanks and another on-board aircraft system increased its capabilities.

    (10) As the previous conflict wound down, and as other more capable aircraft began to be available, the aircraft was increasingly used in a reconnaissance role. In this role, its increased range resulted in new value to the aircraft.

  14. #9914

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    The English Electric Canberra?

  15. #9915

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    Quote Originally Posted by SimonCraig1 View Post
    The English Electric Canberra?

    No; not the Canberra, SimonCraig. But here's a big clue to reward your effort. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What warbird do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) It was the first of its kind for the country which built it; and the first to perform a feat which is, today, not only commonplace, but essential.

    (2) It was also the first of its kind for a group of allies.

    (3) It was recognized fairly early on that this aircraft would have a short lifespan; but it was put pressed into service to bridge a gap until newer and better aircraft could be readied for production.

    (4) It began life when concern began to grow over new enemy aircraft being introduced.

    (5) After conflict broke out, the aircraft began to prove its value in multiple roles; although continual problems with the engines, and other minor problems continued.

    (6) At the same time, new technology breakthroughs allowed the aircraft to assume a new role; one previously reserved to other, larger aircraft. Its value in this new role was considered to be crucial.

    (7) Enemy defenses in the conflict forced the aircraft into a night role. Despite the limited number of airframes available, its value was obvious.

    (8) At the same time, the aircraft was made available to another friendly nation.

    (9) During the same period, the aircraft began to prove its worth in its new role. Additional fuel tanks and another on-board aircraft system increased its capabilities.

    (10) As the previous conflict wound down, and as other more capable aircraft began to be available, the aircraft was increasingly used in a reconnaissance role. In this role, its increased range resulted in new value to the aircraft.

    (11) The aircraft’s new role extended its useful life. Still, by the late 1950’s, the aircraft no longer served a front line role.

  16. #9916

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    And a morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Question: What warbird do I describe?

    Clues:

    (1) It was the first of its kind for the country which built it; and the first to perform a feat which is, today, not only commonplace, but essential.

    (2) It was also the first of its kind for a group of allies.

    (3) It was recognized fairly early on that this aircraft would have a short lifespan; but it was put pressed into service to bridge a gap until newer and better aircraft could be readied for production.

    (4) It began life when concern began to grow over new enemy aircraft being introduced.

    (5) After conflict broke out, the aircraft began to prove its value in multiple roles; although continual problems with the engines, and other minor problems continued.

    (6) At the same time, new technology breakthroughs allowed the aircraft to assume a new role; one previously reserved to other, larger aircraft. Its value in this new role was considered to be crucial.

    (7) Enemy defenses in the conflict forced the aircraft into a night role. Despite the limited number of airframes available, its value was obvious.

    (8) At the same time, the aircraft was made available to another friendly nation.

    (9) During the same period, the aircraft began to prove its worth in its new role. Additional fuel tanks and another on-board aircraft system increased its capabilities.

    (10) As the previous conflict wound down, and as other more capable aircraft began to be available, the aircraft was increasingly used in a reconnaissance role. In this role, its increased range resulted in new value to the aircraft.

    (11) The aircraft’s new role extended its useful life. Still, by the late 1950’s, the aircraft no longer served a front line role.

    (12) A few continued as test aircraft into the 1970’s.

  17. #9917

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    North American B-45 Tornado?

  18. #9918
    uncljoe's Avatar
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    Republic F 84 ThunderJet
    Semper Fi
    Remove guess as in doesn't meet the question requirements
    Last edited by uncljoe; 07-24-2014 at 03:07 PM.
    Look towards the Horizon......your death awaits you there So Enjoy today ,,,,,,

  19. #9919

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyS View Post
    North American B-45 Tornado?
    Ding, Ding, Ding!!! Ladies and Gentlemen, we have a winner. The B-45 it is, JohnnyS. And, you're up. What's your question? The B-45 filled a crucial gap while the B-47 was being readied for production. And, with the reduced size of nuclear bombs, it was later capable of hauling nukes and adding to the US nuclear punch at a critical time. After that, it served as a recon platform. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Answer: The B-45 Tornado Light Bomber



    The North American B-45 Tornado was the United States Air Force's first operational jet bomber, and the first multi-jet engined bomber in the world to be refuelled in midair. The B-45 was an important part of the United States's nuclear deterrent for several years in the early 1950s, but was rapidly succeeded by the Boeing B-47 Stratojet. B-45s and RB-45s served in the United States Air Force's Strategic Air Command from 1950 until 1959. It was also the first jet bomber of the NATO Alliance, which was formed in 1949.

    The B-45 began development in 1944, when the War Department, alarmed by German jet bombers like the Arado Ar 234, called for a new family of jet bombers grossing between 80,000 lb (36,287 kg) and 200,000 lb (90,718 kg). The North American proposal (NA-130) won, and on September 8, 1944, the company began production of three prototypes based on the NA-130.

    The end of World War II resulted in the cancellation of many projects and delayed many others. In 1946, rising tensions with the Soviet Union caused the Air Force to assign higher priorities to jet bomber development and production. By mid-1946, the XB-45 and Convair XB-46 neared completion, but the Boeing XB-47 and Martin XB-48 were still two years away. The USAAF chose to evaluate the first two designs to determine which would be superior operationally. The B-45 proved a superior design, and on January 2, 1947, a contract for immediate production of B-45As was signed. It had been planned to equip five light bomb groups and three light reconnaissance groups with B-45As but as the B-47's development and flight testing made future production all but certain, the B-45's future became increasingly uncertain and in mid-1948 the Air Staff actually began to question the B-45's value. Soon afterwards, President Truman's budget restraints reduced Air Force expenditure and B-45 production was reduced to total of 142 airframes. Further budget cuts in the FY 1950 forced the Aircraft and Weapons Board to cancel 51 of the 190 aircraft on order. It was later replaced by the supersonic Convair B-58 Hustler.

    Continuously plagued by engine problems along with numerous other minor flaws, the B-45 regained importance when the United States entered the Korean War in 1950 and would prove its value both as a bomber and in a reconnaissance role. The mass dedication of U.S. forces to the Korean War revealed the vulnerability of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization forces in Europe to Soviet attack and it was in this light that the Air Force made an important decision about the future of the B-45. The B-45, like most post-World War II U.S. bombers, could carry both nuclear and conventional bombs. The progress of weapons technology had led to a great reduction in the weight and size of nuclear weapons in U.S. inventory, effectively allowing smaller aircraft such as the B-45 to carry out nuclear strikes, a mission which had initially been limited to heavy bombers. Suddenly, the small fleet of B-45s had great value again as a nuclear deterrent.

    Operation Fandango, sometimes called Operation Backbreaker, entailed modifications to the aircraft for nuclear missions. In addition, the 40 B-45s allocated to the program also were equipped with a new defensive system and extra fuel tanks. Despite the magnitude of the modification project, plus ongoing problems with the early jet engines, atomic-capable B-45s began reaching the United Kingdom in May 1952, and deployment of the 40 aircraft was completed in mid June. It was at about this same time that RB-45s of the 323rd Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron began to arrive in Japan to fly alongside the 91st Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron, supplementing the WWII era piston engine RB-29s which had proved to be easy targets for North Korean MiGs. The RB-45s would provide valuable intelligence throughout the remainder of the Korean War despite the limited number of airframes which were available. RB-45Cs flew many daylight missions until early 1952, when they were converted to night operations after an RB-45 was almost lost to a MiG-15.

    All 33 RB-45Cs built were assigned to the 91st Strategic Reconnaissance Wing's 322nd, 323rd and 324th Strategic Reconnaissance Squadrons. The RB-45C also flew several long-range reconnaissance missions over the Soviet Union during the mid-1950s. On July 29, 1952, an RB-45C made the first non-stop Trans-Pacific flight, having been refueled twice by KB-29s along the way. Maj. Lou Carrington and his crew of the 91st Reconnaissance Wing flew from Alaska to Japan in 9hrs 50mins, winning the MacKay Trophy for their achievement. Within the 91st SRW, by 1954 the RB-45C had been replaced by the RB-47E. The phased out RB-45Cs went to the 19th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron, which operated them until being withdrawn from operational use in the spring of 1958.

    By the end of the 1950s all B-45s were removed from active duty service. However, a few continued to act as test aircraft into the early 1970s.

    The only other nation to use the RB-45C was Britain, which were operated by an ad hoc unit of crews largely drawn from Nos. 35 and 115 squadrons. Whilst the USAF were prohibited by the President of the United States from overflying the Soviet Union unless under a state of war, allies closer to the European theatre of war might. Whilst successive Labour governments had refused, the return of Winston Churchill and a Conservative administration to Downing Street brought a change of options.

    As a result under Operation Ju-jitsu, in July 1951 four aircraft were bailed to Britain from the 91st Strategic Reconnaissance Wing to form a Royal Air Force (RAF) Special Duty Flight commanded by Squadron Leader John Crampton. Stripped of all USAF markings and then applied with RAF markings, the four aircraft were attached to a USAF squadron based in RAF Sculthorpe, Norfolk in eastern England.

    The aircraft were tasked with flying deep level reconnaissance missions over the Soviet Union to gather electronic and photographic intelligence. The special duties flight conducted missions during the period 1952–54.

    On April 17, 1952, three aircraft were tasked to head for Kiev from Germany, scheduled to return to Sculthorpe ten hours later. Flying at 36,000 feet (11,000 m), Crampton's aircraft was tracked by ground radar and came under anti-aircraft fire. Applying full power, he immediately turned and headed for Germany, none too soon as Soviet night fighters had been dispatched to hunt down his aircraft.

    Subsequent flights over the Soviet Union were carried out using English Electric Canberras under the codename Operation Robin, operating at higher altitudes of around 54,000 ft (16,000 m). It was not until 1994 (under the "fifty year rule" of the Public Records Act 1958) that the existence of the spy missions became public knowledge.

  20. #9920

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyS View Post
    North American B-45 Tornado?
    Ding, Ding, Ding!!! Ladies and Gentlemen, we have a winner. The B-45 it is, JohnnyS. And, you're up. What's your question? The B-45 filled a crucial gap while the B-47 was being readied for production. And, with the reduced size of nuclear bombs, it was later capable of hauling nukes and adding to the US nuclear punch at a critical time. After that, it served as a recon platform. Thanks; Ernie P.


    Answer: The B-45 Tornado Light Bomber



    The North American B-45 Tornado was the United States Air Force's first operational jet bomber, and the first multi-jet engined bomber in the world to be refuelled in midair. The B-45 was an important part of the United States's nuclear deterrent for several years in the early 1950s, but was rapidly succeeded by the Boeing B-47 Stratojet. B-45s and RB-45s served in the United States Air Force's Strategic Air Command from 1950 until 1959. It was also the first jet bomber of the NATO Alliance, which was formed in 1949.

    The B-45 began development in 1944, when the War Department, alarmed by German jet bombers like the Arado Ar 234, called for a new family of jet bombers grossing between 80,000 lb (36,287 kg) and 200,000 lb (90,718 kg). The North American proposal (NA-130) won, and on September 8, 1944, the company began production of three prototypes based on the NA-130.

    The end of World War II resulted in the cancellation of many projects and delayed many others. In 1946, rising tensions with the Soviet Union caused the Air Force to assign higher priorities to jet bomber development and production. By mid-1946, the XB-45 and Convair XB-46 neared completion, but the Boeing XB-47 and Martin XB-48 were still two years away. The USAAF chose to evaluate the first two designs to determine which would be superior operationally. The B-45 proved a superior design, and on January 2, 1947, a contract for immediate production of B-45As was signed. It had been planned to equip five light bomb groups and three light reconnaissance groups with B-45As but as the B-47's development and flight testing made future production all but certain, the B-45's future became increasingly uncertain and in mid-1948 the Air Staff actually began to question the B-45's value. Soon afterwards, President Truman's budget restraints reduced Air Force expenditure and B-45 production was reduced to total of 142 airframes. Further budget cuts in the FY 1950 forced the Aircraft and Weapons Board to cancel 51 of the 190 aircraft on order. It was later replaced by the supersonic Convair B-58 Hustler.

    Continuously plagued by engine problems along with numerous other minor flaws, the B-45 regained importance when the United States entered the Korean War in 1950 and would prove its value both as a bomber and in a reconnaissance role. The mass dedication of U.S. forces to the Korean War revealed the vulnerability of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization forces in Europe to Soviet attack and it was in this light that the Air Force made an important decision about the future of the B-45. The B-45, like most post-World War II U.S. bombers, could carry both nuclear and conventional bombs. The progress of weapons technology had led to a great reduction in the weight and size of nuclear weapons in U.S. inventory, effectively allowing smaller aircraft such as the B-45 to carry out nuclear strikes, a mission which had initially been limited to heavy bombers. Suddenly, the small fleet of B-45s had great value again as a nuclear deterrent.

    Operation Fandango, sometimes called Operation Backbreaker, entailed modifications to the aircraft for nuclear missions. In addition, the 40 B-45s allocated to the program also were equipped with a new defensive system and extra fuel tanks. Despite the magnitude of the modification project, plus ongoing problems with the early jet engines, atomic-capable B-45s began reaching the United Kingdom in May 1952, and deployment of the 40 aircraft was completed in mid June. It was at about this same time that RB-45s of the 323rd Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron began to arrive in Japan to fly alongside the 91st Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron, supplementing the WWII era piston engine RB-29s which had proved to be easy targets for North Korean MiGs. The RB-45s would provide valuable intelligence throughout the remainder of the Korean War despite the limited number of airframes which were available. RB-45Cs flew many daylight missions until early 1952, when they were converted to night operations after an RB-45 was almost lost to a MiG-15.

    All 33 RB-45Cs built were assigned to the 91st Strategic Reconnaissance Wing's 322nd, 323rd and 324th Strategic Reconnaissance Squadrons. The RB-45C also flew several long-range reconnaissance missions over the Soviet Union during the mid-1950s. On July 29, 1952, an RB-45C made the first non-stop Trans-Pacific flight, having been refueled twice by KB-29s along the way. Maj. Lou Carrington and his crew of the 91st Reconnaissance Wing flew from Alaska to Japan in 9hrs 50mins, winning the MacKay Trophy for their achievement. Within the 91st SRW, by 1954 the RB-45C had been replaced by the RB-47E. The phased out RB-45Cs went to the 19th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron, which operated them until being withdrawn from operational use in the spring of 1958.

    By the end of the 1950s all B-45s were removed from active duty service. However, a few continued to act as test aircraft into the early 1970s.

    The only other nation to use the RB-45C was Britain, which were operated by an ad hoc unit of crews largely drawn from Nos. 35 and 115 squadrons. Whilst the USAF were prohibited by the President of the United States from overflying the Soviet Union unless under a state of war, allies closer to the European theatre of war might. Whilst successive Labour governments had refused, the return of Winston Churchill and a Conservative administration to Downing Street brought a change of options.

    As a result under Operation Ju-jitsu, in July 1951 four aircraft were bailed to Britain from the 91st Strategic Reconnaissance Wing to form a Royal Air Force (RAF) Special Duty Flight commanded by Squadron Leader John Crampton. Stripped of all USAF markings and then applied with RAF markings, the four aircraft were attached to a USAF squadron based in RAF Sculthorpe, Norfolk in eastern England.

    The aircraft were tasked with flying deep level reconnaissance missions over the Soviet Union to gather electronic and photographic intelligence. The special duties flight conducted missions during the period 195254.

    On April 17, 1952, three aircraft were tasked to head for Kiev from Germany, scheduled to return to Sculthorpe ten hours later. Flying at 36,000 feet (11,000 m), Crampton's aircraft was tracked by ground radar and came under anti-aircraft fire. Applying full power, he immediately turned and headed for Germany, none too soon as Soviet night fighters had been dispatched to hunt down his aircraft.

    Subsequent flights over the Soviet Union were carried out using English Electric Canberras under the codename Operation Robin, operating at higher altitudes of around 54,000 ft (16,000 m). It was not until 1994 (under the "fifty year rule" of the Public Records Act 1958) that the existence of the spy missions became public knowledge.

  21. #9921

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    That was a good one, Ernie!

    OK, here's one that is interesting.

    1. 4 engined (first prototype only)
    2. Single massive weapons bay.
    3. Never reached production. There were 3 prototypes only, and of those only the first and last ever flew.
    4. Crew of 2.

  22. #9922

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    1. 4 engined (first prototype only)
    2. Single massive weapons bay.
    3. Never reached production. There were 3 prototypes only, and of those only the first and last ever flew.
    4. Crew of 2.
    5. The first prototype had dual nosewheels, which were taken from B-24 Liberators.

  23. #9923

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyS View Post
    1. 4 engined (first prototype only)
    2. Single massive weapons bay.
    3. Never reached production. There were 3 prototypes only, and of those only the first and last ever flew.
    4. Crew of 2.
    5. The first prototype had dual nosewheels, which were taken from B-24 Liberators.

    JohnnyS; if you're going where I think you're going with this, it's a really good question. And very good work on the wording of the clues. Thanks; Ernie P.

  24. #9924

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    Thanks, Ernie!

    New clue for Saturday.

    1. 4 engined (first prototype only)
    2. Single massive weapons bay.
    3. Never reached production. There were 3 prototypes only, and of those only the first and last ever flew.
    4. Crew of 2.
    5. The first prototype had dual nosewheels, which were taken from B-24 Liberators.
    6. The third prototype was completed and flown in a different country than the country where its original construction started.

  25. #9925
    RCU Forum Manager/Admin RCKen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyS View Post
    Thanks, Ernie!

    New clue for Saturday.

    1. 4 engined (first prototype only)
    2. Single massive weapons bay.
    3. Never reached production. There were 3 prototypes only, and of those only the first and last ever flew.
    4. Crew of 2.
    5. The first prototype had dual nosewheels, which were taken from B-24 Liberators.
    6. The third prototype was completed and flown in a different country than the country where its original construction started.
    I'm pretty sure that I have the answer here on this one. I'm putting it out but if I'm right it will be tomorrow before I'll have the next quiz ready and up. Anyway, here goes my guess"

    Junkers Ju-287

    Click image for larger version. 

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