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Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

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Old 03-03-2017, 09:43 PM
  #14001  
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Originally Posted by Ernie P. View Post
You know, that fits all the clues! I was too fixated on German planes for some reason. Thanks; Ernie P.
The Allied aerodrome landing automatically had me going that way too. There were all kinds of cool ideas on paper but not as many made it into service. You wonder had the European theatre continued another 6, 12 months what may have emerged.. at least on the desperate technological side which generally results in lots of interesting things to read about and gawk at in museums. Definitely not referring to the side of human toll.. just fascinating skunk works stuff.
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Old 03-04-2017, 11:01 AM
  #14002  
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Originally Posted by MJD View Post
The Allied aerodrome landing automatically had me going that way too. There were all kinds of cool ideas on paper but not as many made it into service. You wonder had the European theatre continued another 6, 12 months what may have emerged.. at least on the desperate technological side which generally results in lots of interesting things to read about and gawk at in museums. Definitely not referring to the side of human toll.. just fascinating skunk works stuff.
For me, I think it was clue (5) "All the victims were two or four engined aircraft." That made me think of the German defensive measures against the allied bombing campaign. Classic misdirection. And well done! Thanks; Ernie P.
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Old 03-04-2017, 11:17 AM
  #14003  
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Originally Posted by Top_Gunn View Post
How about the Sea Hurricanes. Launched from ships but unable to land, so the pilots bailed out and were usually picked up. Never knew much abvout them until this quiz came along (if I'm right).
And we have a winner!!!! We'll done Top_Gunn and thanks everyone for the comments.

Nicknamed the Hurricat, In total, there were nine combat launches. Eight aircraft and one pilot were lost for eight German aircraft destroyed and one damaged.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CAM_ship

I also found this:
Sept. 14 1941:
11:45 – Lookouts reported an aircraft flying at sea level, bearing 360°. At the time the visibility was about 7 miles and identification was not possible.
11:55 – The aircraft was again seen, bearing 045°. HMS Vanoc opened fire and reported a Focke Wolfe, at a distance of about 7 miles from the convoy.
11:58 – In 51 08N 11 53W, when at a distance of about 7 miles and on the same bearing, the aircraft was seen in silouhette, and Maplin identified it as a Focke Wolfe.
12:00 – The aircraft turned towards the convoy and appeared to be coming in for attack, so a Hurricane was flown off. The pilot, Sub Lt. C. Walker, R.N.V.R. saw the enemy immediately as he left the ship and went straight to meet it, carrying out a head-on attack until at point blank range. He saw that his ammunition entered the nose of the German aircraft.
He then turned and carried out an attack from astern, reporting that his ammunition again hit the enemy, which subsequently entered a cloud, with the Hurricane close on its tail. This part of the encounter was witnessed from Maplin, and her commander was “very disappointed” to see that the Focke Wolfe was able to continue flying.
Knowing the difficult conditions in which the Hurricane’s pilot had to operate he was ordered back to the ship and was directed to intercept. He was able to do so, but due to cloud, he could not fire anything other than short bursts, after the last of which the enemy jettisoned his bomb load from above cloud before taking off towards his base.
This was plotted out by RD/F to 40 miles on a course of 120°. As the bombs hit the water, the Hurricane came into view below cloud, and was again ordered to follow the Focke Wolfe, but as R/T failed at this point, it continued to orbit the convoy, and R/T contact was not regained while it was in the air.
13:54 – The pilot baled out and was picked up by HMS Rochester, then returned to Maplin at 14:17.

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Old 03-04-2017, 12:19 PM
  #14004  
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Some of the more obscure clues:

5. All the victims were two or four engined aircraft. FW Condor, He111 and JU-88
6. The type of mission resulted in frequent pilot rotation to ensure stick time was kept up. With only one flight per sailing trip the RAF were concerned the pilots would get rusty. To help avoid this, the pilots would launch the end of the trip to be able to get some flying time in.
9. It was seen as a stop gap measure to a particular menace. (two clues here) The somewhat cryptic reference was to the gap in air coverage in the North Atlantic where the Condors could fly unhindered. Once the escort carriers began arriving in numbers the need for the CAM ship reduced.
10. The aircraft that survived landed at an allied aerodrome. One plane landed in Russia from an Arctic convoy launch.
11. While not Me 163's rockets were involved. Rocket propelled catapults... sorry guys.
13. Visible and considered a success as a deterrent, dummy implementations were made to fool enemy attackers. At least two ships were fitted with a dummy catapult and Hurricane to try and scare off bombers.
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Old 03-04-2017, 01:01 PM
  #14005  
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That was an extraordinarily informative quiz. I'd read about the Sea Hurricanes but never saw a detailed discussion. It was the combination of low pilot losses and high aircraft losses that finally tipped me off.

New quiz. I'll start with ordinary, straightforward clues. If nobody gets it after a decent interval, I have a clue in reserve which will probably tip off a lot of people, but mostly, or even entirely, "people of a certain age," as the saying goes.

Looking for a pilot.

1. Joined the military in peacetime.

2. Fighter pilot with some kills, but not an ace.

3. Best known (apart from future old-person clue yet to come) for wartime aviation operations other than air-to-air combat.
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Old 03-04-2017, 01:28 PM
  #14006  
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Okay, I'll bite. Claire Chennault
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Old 03-04-2017, 02:00 PM
  #14007  
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Not Chennault. Not a bad guess, though.
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Old 03-04-2017, 08:50 PM
  #14008  
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Originally Posted by Top_Gunn View Post
That was an extraordinarily informative quiz. I'd read about the Sea Hurricanes but never saw a detailed discussion. It was the combination of low pilot losses and high aircraft losses that finally tipped me off.

New quiz. I'll start with ordinary, straightforward clues. If nobody gets it after a decent interval, I have a clue in reserve which will probably tip off a lot of people, but mostly, or even entirely, "people of a certain age," as the saying goes.

Looking for a pilot.

1. Joined the military in peacetime.

2. Fighter pilot with some kills, but not an ace.

3. Best known (apart from future old-person clue yet to come) for wartime aviation operations other than air-to-air combat.

How about General Spaatz; the head of Strategic Air Forces in Europe, during WWII? Thanks; Ernie P.


Carl Andrew "Tooey" Spaatz (June 28, 1891 – July 14, 1974) was an American World War II general. As commander of Strategic Air Forces in Europe in 1944, he successfully pressed for the bombing of the enemy’s oil production facilities as a priority over other targets. He became Chief of Staff of the newly formed United States Air Force in 1947.
Following America's entry into World War I, Spaatz was sent with the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF) in command of the 31st Aero Squadron. Spaatz was appointed Officer in Charge, American Aviation School at Issoudun, France but after receiving orders to return to the United States, he saw three weeks of action during the final months of the war with the 13th Aero Squadron as a supernumerary pilot. In this brief period, Spaatz shot down three enemy planes and was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross (DSC); during the time he was promoted to the temporary rank of Major on 17 June 1918.
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Old 03-05-2017, 06:31 AM
  #14009  
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Not Spaatz, but a good guess. Here's another clue and an amendment to clue 2::


Looking for a pilot.

1. Joined the military in peacetime.

2. Fighter pilot with some kills (according to one source; others don't mention these), but not an ace.

3. Best known (apart from future old-person clue yet to come) for wartime aviation operations other than air-to-air combat.

4. Known for aggressiveness, independence, and a willingness to try unorthodox methods.
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Old 03-05-2017, 01:39 PM
  #14010  
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OK, the last clue could apply to just about any great wartime pilot, so here's another one:

Looking for a pilot.

1. Joined the military in peacetime.

2. Fighter pilot with some kills (according to one source; others don't mention these), but not an ace.

3. Best known (apart from future old-person clue yet to come) for wartime aviation operations other than air-to-air combat.

4. Known for aggressiveness, independence, and a willingness to try unorthodox methods.

5. One of his successes involved gliders.
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Old 03-05-2017, 08:20 PM
  #14011  
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Originally Posted by Top_Gunn View Post
OK, the last clue could apply to just about any great wartime pilot, so here's another one:

Looking for a pilot.

1. Joined the military in peacetime.

2. Fighter pilot with some kills (according to one source; others don't mention these), but not an ace.

3. Best known (apart from future old-person clue yet to come) for wartime aviation operations other than air-to-air combat.

4. Known for aggressiveness, independence, and a willingness to try unorthodox methods.

5. One of his successes involved gliders.

Unless you're pitching curves, there are only a small handful. So; how about Happy Arnold? Thanks; Ernie P.


Henry Harley "Hap" Arnold(June 25, 1886 – January 15, 1950) was an American general officer holdingthe gradesof General of the Army and Generalof the Air Force. Arnold was an aviation pioneer, Chief ofthe AirCorps (1938–1941), Commanding General of the U.S. Army Air Forces, the only U.S. Air Forcegeneral to hold five-star rank, and the only officerto hold a five-star rank in two different U.S. military services.[SUP][1][/SUP] Arnold was also the founder of ProjectRAND, which evolved into one of the world's largest non-profit global policythink tanks, the RANDCorporation, and one of the founders of PanAmerican World Airways.

Major General Henry"Hap" Arnold, Acting Deputy Chief of Staff for Air(becoming Commanding General of the UnitedStates Army Air Forces on March 9, 1942), initiated a studywith view to develop a glider capable of being towed by aircraft. Thisdirective was set into motion through Classified Technical Instructions(CTI-198 on 24 February 1941, and CTI-203 on 4 March 1941), which authorizedthe procurement of 2-, 8-, and 15-place gliders and equipment. Eleven companieswere invited to participate in the experimental glider program, but only fourresponded with any interest, Frankfort Sailplane Company(XCG-1, XCG-2), WacoAircraft Company (XCG-3, XCG-4), St. Louis Aircraft Corp. (XCG-5, XCG-6), and Bowlus Sailplanes (XCG-7, XCG-8). Only Waco AircraftCompany was able to deliver the experimental glider prototypes that satisfiedthe requirements of Materiel Command, the eight-seat Waco CG-3 (modified tobecome a production nine-seat glider) and the fifteen-seat Waco CG-4. In October1941, Lewin B. Barringer was made Glider Specialist, AirStaff, HQ of the Army Air Forces, answering to General Arnold, and placed incharge of the glider program. The shock of the Japaneseattack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941 prompted the UnitedStates to set the number of glider pilots needed at 1,000 to fly 500 eight-seatgliders and 500 fifteen-seat gliders. The number of pilots required wasincreased to 6,000 by June 1942.[SUP][2][/SUP] After Barringer was lost at sea on aflight to Africa in January 1943, the program came under direction of RichardC. du Pont.[SUP][4][/SUP] Bigger gliders, such as the 30-troop Waco CG-13A and the42-troop Laister-Kauffman CG-10A were designed later.[SUP][5][/SUP]
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Old 03-06-2017, 05:24 AM
  #14012  
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Not Arnold. Here's this morning's clue, and clue 2 has been restored to its original form after further research.

Looking for a pilot.

1. Joined the military in peacetime.

2. Fighter pilot with some kills, but not an ace.

3. Best known (apart from future old-person clue yet to come) for wartime aviation operations other than air-to-air combat.

4. Known for aggressiveness, independence, and a willingness to try unorthodox methods.

5. One of his successes involved gliders.

6. Became well-known before ever flying in combat.
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Old 03-06-2017, 08:24 AM
  #14013  
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Originally Posted by Top_Gunn View Post
Not Arnold. Here's this morning's clue, and clue 2 has been restored to its original form after further research.

Looking for a pilot.

1. Joined the military in peacetime.

2. Fighter pilot with some kills, but not an ace.

3. Best known (apart from future old-person clue yet to come) for wartime aviation operations other than air-to-air combat.

4. Known for aggressiveness, independence, and a willingness to try unorthodox methods.

5. One of his successes involved gliders.

6. Became well-known before ever flying in combat.

Okay; next up is Billy Mitchell. Thanks; Ernie P.


Sent north in 1901, Mitchell successfully built telegraph lines in remote areas of Alaska. During this posting, he began studying Otto Lilienthal's glider experiments. This reading, combined with further research, led him to conclude in 1906 that future conflicts would be fought in the air. Two years later, he witnessed a flying demonstration given by Orville Wright at Fort Myer, VA. Sent to the Army Staff College, he became the only Signal Corps Officer on the Army General Staff in 1913. As aviation was assigned to the Signal Corps, Mitchell was well placed to further develop his interest.
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Old 03-06-2017, 09:28 AM
  #14014  
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Not Mitchell. With one possible exception (Spaatz), the guesses so far are all names that are well-known to people of any age who have even a passing interest in military aviation. I'm pretty sure that, though the pilot I'm looking for was well-known in his time, very few people under perhaps 50 or 60 will recognize his name today. But those of my generation will get it at once when the geezers' clue is revealed. That event will occur later this week; for now, here's another clue:

Looking for a pilot.

1. Joined the military in peacetime.

2. Fighter pilot with some kills, but not an ace.

3. Best known (apart from future old-person clue yet to come) for wartime aviation operations other than air-to-air combat.

4. Known for aggressiveness, independence, and a willingness to try unorthodox methods.

5. One of his successes involved gliders.

6. Became well-known before ever flying in combat.

7. He was a full colonel when he left the service about a year after the war in which he fought ended.
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Old 03-07-2017, 05:12 AM
  #14015  
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Today's clue. Clues for the elderly begin tomorrow.

Looking for a pilot.

1. Joined the military in peacetime.

2. Fighter pilot with some kills, but not an ace.

3. Best known (apart from future old-person clue yet to come) for wartime aviation operations other than air-to-air combat.

4. Known for aggressiveness, independence, and a willingness to try unorthodox methods.

5. One of his successes involved gliders.

6. Became well-known before ever flying in combat.

7. He was a full colonel when he left the service about a year after the war in which he fought ended.

8. Fought in Africa and Asia.
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Old 03-07-2017, 09:28 AM
  #14016  
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Hmm.. sounding like maybe Col. Phillip Cochran, the flip side of Flip Corkin/Terry and the Pirates and Steve Canyon. Africa and Burma.

The 1st Air Commando, among other missions, was assigned the task of supporting Allied Long Range Penetration Groups, of the British Army's Chindits, invading Japanese-held Burma. Some of these forces were designated to fly in by towed gliders; all required resupply by regular airdrops during their missions, as well as air support. Under Cochran's command, the 1st Air Commando's C-47 pilots perfected the tactic of snatching loaded gliders from small areas of ground cleared of jungle vegetation into the air using stretchable nylon ropes, all while flying at 15 to 30 feet using breaks in the jungle canopy.[SUP][11][/SUP] Upon witnessing one of these demonstrations, the Allied theater commander, Admiral Lord Louis Mountbatten exclaimed, "Jesus Christ All Bloody Mighty!"[SUP][11]


[/SUP]I hope this is it.. the connection of interest to me is that I was named after my mum's brother Mike - who served with the Chindits in Burma but did not survive the war. My most treasured heirloom is a centuries old Samurai sword presented to him by a surrendering Japanese general.. shark's tooth ivory inlays, silk wrapped handle, had been through the test of the twenty cuts, etc.
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Old 03-07-2017, 09:39 AM
  #14017  
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Originally Posted by MJD View Post
Hmm.. sounding like maybe Col. Phillip Cochran, the flip side of Flip Corkin/Terry and the Pirates and Steve Canyon. Africa and Burma.

The 1st Air Commando, among other missions, was assigned the task of supporting Allied Long Range Penetration Groups, of the British Army's Chindits, invading Japanese-held Burma. Some of these forces were designated to fly in by towed gliders; all required resupply by regular airdrops during their missions, as well as air support. Under Cochran's command, the 1st Air Commando's C-47 pilots perfected the tactic of snatching loaded gliders from small areas of ground cleared of jungle vegetation into the air using stretchable nylon ropes, all while flying at 15 to 30 feet using breaks in the jungle canopy.[SUP][11][/SUP] Upon witnessing one of these demonstrations, the Allied theater commander, Admiral Lord Louis Mountbatten exclaimed, "Jesus Christ All Bloody Mighty!"[SUP][11]


[/SUP]I hope this is it.. the connection of interest to me is that I was named after my mum's brother Mike - who served with the Chindits in Burma but did not survive the war. My most treasured heirloom is a centuries old Samurai sword presented to him by a surrendering Japanese general.. shark's tooth ivory inlays, silk wrapped handle, had been through the test of the twenty cuts, etc.
You know, I hope this is the correct answer; simply because it makes such a great story. Thanks for the education, Sir; Ernie P.
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Old 03-07-2017, 09:45 AM
  #14018  
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Missing the answer is cool - we see a bunch of interesting/obscure info cruise through here in the process!
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Old 03-07-2017, 10:33 AM
  #14019  
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It is indeed Philip Cochran, widely known even before he went overseas because he was the real-life model for Flip Corkin in "Terry and the Pirates" and then General Philerie in "Steve Canyon." Both strips by Milton Caniff, who knew Cochran.

Here's the Wikipedia Page, with the basics: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_Cochran

And here's an account from the Erie, PA hall of fame, with more detail: http://eriehalloffame.com/nominees/philip_cochran.asp

Good job getting it before I started dropping clues about the comics, MJD. And you are up!
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Old 03-07-2017, 01:04 PM
  #14020  
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Oh no, my turn again..! Later today..
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Old 03-09-2017, 01:42 PM
  #14021  
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I was gonna guess Col. Wilhelm Klink...
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Old 03-09-2017, 06:45 PM
  #14022  
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Originally Posted by MJD View Post
Oh no, my turn again..! Later today..
Sir; are you going to post your question? Thanks; Ernie P.
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Old 03-09-2017, 08:06 PM
  #14023  
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I saw a post in the 1/2A forum by MJD...he's actually building a model airplane!
Just sarcasm...I have not touched a kit or ARF in quite some time...don't get bugged at me...just joking...

I know that the e-mail notifications are iffy...I don't always get notifications...???
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Old 03-10-2017, 08:35 PM
  #14024  
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Originally Posted by MJD View Post
Oh no, my turn again..! Later today..
Sir; it has been three days since you acknowledged you had the lead. If you don't get something posted by tomorrow evening, we will regretfully have to move on. Thanks; Ernie P.
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Old 03-10-2017, 08:39 PM
  #14025  
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Originally Posted by proptop View Post
I saw a post in the 1/2A forum by MJD...he's actually building a model airplane!
Just sarcasm...I have not touched a kit or ARF in quite some time...don't get bugged at me...just joking...

I know that the e-mail notifications are iffy...I don't always get notifications...???
Believe it or not, I was actually at the flying field this morning. We were supposed to be doing preventive maintenance and routine repairs on our mowers; getting ready for flying season. Unfortunately, it was 39 degrees, windy, with rain/sleet/snow. We'll try again some time next week. Thanks; Ernie P.
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