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Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

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Old 11-10-2017, 12:12 AM
  #15001
Hydro Junkie
 
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Nope, not the HE-112. Time for another clue:
Looking for an aircraft in this quick quiz:
1) This plane was used in combat by a country OTHER than the one that built it
2) This plane never saw combat for it's own country
3) It was smaller, lighter and faster than it's three operational predecessors
4) It was powered by the same engine as the two planes previously produced by it's manufacturer as well as two other successful designs by other companies
5) Well over 1,000 examples were manufactured, many by a second company under license
Good Luck
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Old 11-10-2017, 03:49 PM
  #15002
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No guesses? I guess it's time for another clue, or two
Looking for an aircraft in this quick quiz:
1) This plane was used in combat by a country OTHER than the one that built it
2) This plane never saw combat for it's own country
3) It was smaller, lighter and faster than it's three operational predecessors
4) It was powered by the same engine as the two planes previously produced by it's manufacturer as well as two other successful designs by other companies
5) Well over 1,000 examples were manufactured, many by a second company under license
6) The prototype was armed with the same weapon type and number as the initial "service version" of an earlier "relative", one that did see combat while in use with it's country of origins military
7) This plane's profile was markedly different from it's predecessors since one of the major design features of the earlier aircraft wasn't included on this aircraft
Good Luck
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Old 11-10-2017, 05:55 PM
  #15003
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And still no guesses? Time for another clue:
Looking for an aircraft in this quick quiz:
1) This plane was used in combat by a country OTHER than the one that built it
2) This plane never saw combat for it's own country
3) It was smaller, lighter and faster than it's three operational predecessors
4) It was powered by the same engine as the two planes previously produced by it's manufacturer as well as two other successful designs by other companies
5) Well over 1,000 examples were manufactured, many by a second company under license
6) The prototype was armed with the same weapon type and number as the initial "service version" of an earlier "relative", one that did see combat while in use with it's country of origins military
7) This plane's profile was markedly different from it's predecessors since one of the major design features of the earlier aircraft wasn't included on this aircraft
8) Of all the aircraft of this type produced, only 10 are still in flying condition today
9) This plane could carry almost as much ordinance as a slightly larger, slightly older and slightly faster plane, built by a competitor referred to in clue 4
Good Luck
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Old 11-10-2017, 08:23 PM
  #15004
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And it looks like it's clue time again:
Looking for an aircraft in this quick quiz:
1) This plane was used in combat by a country OTHER than the one that built it
2) This plane never saw combat for it's own country
3) It was smaller, lighter and faster than it's three operational predecessors
4) It was powered by the same engine as the two planes previously produced by it's manufacturer as well as two other successful designs by other companies
5) Well over 1,000 examples were manufactured, many by a second company under license
6) The prototype was armed with the same weapon type and number as the initial "service version" of an earlier "relative", one that did see combat while in use with it's country of origins military
7) This plane's profile was markedly different from it's predecessors since one of the major design features of the earlier aircraft wasn't included on this aircraft
8) Of all the aircraft of this type produced, only 10 are still in flying condition today
9) This plane could carry almost as much ordinance as a slightly larger, slightly older and slightly faster plane, built by a competitor referred to in clue 4
10) The reason this plane was designed and built was to combat one specific threat
11) The perceived threat was considered so dire that the weapons carried were "upgraded" for more striking power
12) This plane, while a successful design, were only in service in it's home country's military for seven years
Good Luck

Last edited by Hydro Junkie; 11-10-2017 at 08:41 PM.
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Old 11-11-2017, 06:52 PM
  #15005
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Time for another clue, by the looks of it:
Looking for an aircraft in this quick quiz:
1) This plane was used in combat by a country OTHER than the one that built it
2) This plane never saw combat for it's own country
3) It was smaller, lighter and faster than it's three operational predecessors
4) It was powered by the same engine as the two planes previously produced by it's manufacturer as well as two other successful designs by other companies
5) Well over 1,000 examples were manufactured, many by a second company under license
6) The prototype was armed with the same weapon type and number as the initial "service version" of an earlier "relative", one that did see combat while in use with it's country of origins military
7) This plane's profile was markedly different from it's predecessors since one of the major design features of the earlier aircraft wasn't included on this aircraft
8) Of all the aircraft of this type produced, only 10 are still in flying condition today
9) This plane could carry almost as much ordinance as a slightly larger, slightly older and slightly faster plane, built by a competitor referred to in clue 4
10) The reason this plane was designed and built was to combat one specific threat
11) The perceived threat was considered so dire that the weapons carried were "upgraded" for more striking power
12) This plane, while a successful design, were only in service in it's home country's military for seven years
13) This "single seater" was only sold to three countries but, when "phased out" of service by one, it was given to a fourth country and later found it's way to a fifth
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Old 11-11-2017, 11:27 PM
  #15006
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Gee, I figured this quiz would go fairly fast, guess I was wrong. Sounds like it's clue time again:
Looking for an aircraft in this quick quiz:
1) This plane was used in combat by a country OTHER than the one that built it
2) This plane never saw combat for it's own country
3) It was smaller, lighter and faster than it's three operational predecessors
4) It was powered by the same engine as the two planes previously produced by it's manufacturer as well as two other successful designs by other companies
5) Well over 1,000 examples were manufactured, many by a second company under license
6) The prototype was armed with the same weapon type and number as the initial "service version" of an earlier "relative", one that did see combat while in use with it's country of origins military
7) This plane's profile was markedly different from it's predecessors since one of the major design features of the earlier aircraft wasn't included on this aircraft
8) Of all the aircraft of this type produced, only 10 are still in flying condition today
9) This plane could carry almost as much ordinance as a slightly larger, slightly older and slightly faster plane, built by a competitor referred to in clue 4
10) The reason this plane was designed and built was to combat one specific threat
11) The perceived threat was considered so dire that the weapons carried were "upgraded" for more striking power
12) This plane, while a successful design, were only in service in it's home country's military for seven years
13) This "single seater" was only sold to three countries but, when "phased out" of service by one, it was given to a fourth country and later found it's way to a fifth
14) This plane used a 12ft prop
15) Just like it's two immediate predecessors, this plane had versions that were capable of night fighting
Good Luck
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Old 11-12-2017, 05:24 AM
  #15007
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Hydro Junkie; I keep coming up with answers that don't fit all the clues after due reflection. But let's get this one out of the way. How about the F8F Bearcat? Thanks; Ernie P.



Answer: Grumman F8F Bearcat

The Grumman F8F Bearcat is an American single-engine carrier-basedfighter aircraft introduced in late World War II. It went on to serve into the mid-20th century in the United States Navy, the United States Marine Corps, and the air forces of other nations. It would be Grumman Aircraft's final piston engined fighter aircraft. Modified versions have broken speed records for piston-engined aircraft, and are popular among warbird owners. The Bearcat concept began during a meeting between Battle of Midway veteran F4F Wildcat pilots and Grumman Vice President Jake Swirbul at Pearl Harbor on 23 June 1942. At the meeting, Lieutenant Commander Jimmie Thach emphasized one of the most important requirements in a good fighter plane was "climb rate". Climb performance is strongly related to the power-to-weight ratio, and is maximized by wrapping the smallest and lightest possible airframe around the most powerful available engine. Another goal was that the G-58 (Grumman's design designation for the aircraft) should be able to operate from escort carriers, which were then limited to the obsolescent F4F Wildcat as the Grumman F6F Hellcat was too large and heavy. A small, lightweight aircraft would make this possible. After intensively analyzing carrier warfare in the Pacific Theater of Operations for a year and a half, Grumman began development of the G-58 Bearcat in late 1943. There is considerable debate among sources as to whether or not the Focke-Wulf Fw 190 influenced the design of the G-58. It is known that test pilots from Grumman examined and flew a captured Fw 190 in England in early 1943, and the G-58 has a number of design notes in common with the Fw 190 that the Hellcat did not, especially in the cowling and landing gear arrangements. However, no definitive evidence has been presented that these tests had a direct input to the G-58 design.
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Old 11-12-2017, 07:20 PM
  #15008
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I was beginning to think this one would go on for a long time. Ernie, the Bearcat is what I am looking for. Now, as for the clues:
1) This plane was used in combat by a country OTHER than the one that built it Only France bought and flew this "Cat" in combat, specifically over south east Asia
2) This plane never saw combat for it's own country While the US did have in excess of 20 squadrons of F8Fs, they were not used in combat since the F9F was deployed into front line squadrons just prior to the start of the Korean War
3) It was smaller, lighter and faster than it's three operational predecessors The three predecessors were the Wildcat, Hellcat and Tigercat. The Bearcat was smaller and lighter than any of them due to several weight reduction measures taken during the design and construction which, in turn, made the Bearcat almost 50mph faster than the Hellcat
4) It was powered by the same engine as the two planes previously produced by it's manufacturer as well as two other successful designs by other companies The Hellcat, Tigercat and Bearcat all used the P&W Double Wasp, as did the F4U Corsair and P-47 Thunderbolt
5) Well over 1,000 examples were manufactured, many by a second company under license Many Bearcats were produced by General Motors, just like the FM-2 Wildcat and TBM Avenger
6) The prototype was armed with the same weapon type and number as the initial "service version" of an earlier "relative", one that did see combat while in use with it's country of origins military The Bearcat was initially armed with four of the proven Browning .50 caliber machine guns, just like the F4F-3 Wildcat
7) This plane's profile was markedly different from it's predecessors since one of the major design features of the earlier aircraft wasn't included on this aircraft Unlike every other Grumman fighter design previously made, the Bearcat had a bubble canopy rather than the "razorback" design
8) Of all the aircraft of this type produced, only 10 are still in flying condition today
9) This plane could carry almost as much ordinance as a slightly larger, slightly older and slightly faster plane, built by a competitor referred to in clue 4 The aircraft referred to was the F4U Corsair. Depending on which variant you look at, I've found the Corsair could carry between 2500 and 4000lbs of ordinance. The Bearcat could handle roughly 2000lbs of bombs and/or rockets
10) The reason this plane was designed and built was to combat one specific threat I've found several references claiming the Bearcat was built to counter the fast climbing Japanese fighters that could get away from the earlier fighters. Others claimed the Bearcat was built to counter the Japanese suicide planes. Both lines of thought would jive with the referenced above's comments from Jimmy Thatch, considering he flew earlier planes that couldn't match the Japanese planes in rate of climb
11) The perceived threat was considered so dire that the weapons carried were "upgraded" for more striking power The -2 was rearmed with four 20mm cannon, just like was used on some Corsairs
12) This plane, while a successful design, were only in service in it's home country's military for seven years The Bearcat was first assigned to front line squadrons in February 1945. It was phased out prior to the end of 1951
13) This "single seater" was only sold to three countries but, when "phased out" of service by one, it was given to a fourth country and later found it's way to a fifth The F8F was sold to the US, France and Thailand. When the French phased it out, the planes were "given" to Viet Nam where, understandably, some ended up in the north while others ended up in the south
14) This plane used a 12ft prop
15) Just like it's two immediate predecessors, this plane had versions that were capable of night fighting Some Bearcats were equipped with a radar in the same way the Hellcat and Corsair were to make them capable of intercepting "bogies" in the dark
I guess this means Ernie's up!!

Last edited by Hydro Junkie; 11-12-2017 at 07:23 PM.
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Old 11-12-2017, 08:28 PM
  #15009
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Hydro, Junkie; I thought about the Bearcat early on, but one of the clues initially seemed to rule it out. But, it kept coming to mind, so I gave it a try. Thanks. Okay; this will be fast because (1) I am going to get busy toward the end of the week; and (2) There simply isn't all that much to say about the subject. So, I'll drop a few clues to start. Thanks; Ernie P.



What aircraft do I describe?



Clues:

1. It was designed as a fighter. That is significant to the story.

2. It was designed by a governmental department.

3. It was then farmed out to a private company for manufacture.
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Old 11-13-2017, 06:27 AM
  #15010
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And a small handful of morning clues. Thanks; Ernie P.



What aircraft do I describe?



Clues:

1. It was designed as a fighter. That is significant to the story.

2. It was designed by a governmental department.

3. It was then farmed out to a private company for manufacture.

4. But the government built a few as well.

5. And the manufacturer selected added in some wrinkles of its own.

6. By the time it was all done, there were nearly as many variants as aircraft produced.
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Old 11-13-2017, 12:33 PM
  #15011
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And another small handful for the afternoon. Thanks; Ernie P.



What aircraft do I describe?



Clues:

1. It was designed as a fighter. That is significant to the story.

2. It was designed by a governmental department.

3. It was then farmed out to a private company for manufacture.

4. But the government built a few as well.

5. And the manufacturer selected added in some wrinkles of its own.

6. By the time it was all done, there were nearly as many variants as aircraft produced.

7. Even though a single variant accounted for the majority of the small production run.

8. The service which needed the fighter simply didn’t have any fighters of their own.

9. So, they designed their own.
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Old 11-13-2017, 03:09 PM
  #15012
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And a handful of evening clues. Thanks; Ernie P.



What aircraft do I describe?



Clues:

1. It was designed as a fighter. That is significant to the story.

2. It was designed by a governmental department.

3. It was then farmed out to a private company for manufacture.

4. But the government built a few as well.

5. And the manufacturer selected added in some wrinkles of its own.

6. By the time it was all done, there were nearly as many variants as aircraft produced.

7. Even though a single variant accounted for the majority of the small production run.

8. The service which needed the fighter simply didn’t have any fighters of their own.

9. So, they designed their own.

10. They designed an aircraft with a feature not unique, but certainly unusual.

11. The first aircraft delivered had wheels.

12. Which was entirely appropriate for the intended use.
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Old 11-13-2017, 06:47 PM
  #15013
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How about a Kingfisher? I've seen pictures with both floats AND LANDING LANDING GEAR
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Old 11-13-2017, 08:05 PM
  #15014
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hydro Junkie View Post
How about a Kingfisher? I've seen pictures with both floats AND LANDING LANDING GEAR
Not the Kingfisher, Hydro Junkie; but there's nothing wrong with your thought process. Keep trying. And here's a few more clues to encourage your efforts. Thanks; Ernie P.



What aircraft do I describe?



Clues:

1. It was designed as a fighter. That is significant to the story.

2. It was designed by a governmental department.

3. It was then farmed out to a private company for manufacture.

4. But the government built a few as well.

5. And the manufacturer selected added in some wrinkles of its own.

6. By the time it was all done, there were nearly as many variants as aircraft produced.

7. Even though a single variant accounted for the majority of the small production run.

8. The service which needed the fighter simply didn’t have any fighters of their own.

9. So, they designed their own.

10. They designed an aircraft with a feature not unique, but certainly unusual.

11. The first aircraft delivered had wheels.

12. Which was entirely appropriate for the intended use.

13. So the owning service promptly designed a set of floats for it.

14. Which was also appropriate for its use.

15. The owning service built several planes themselves, to see if they could do so at a competitive cost.
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Old 11-14-2017, 02:51 AM
  #15015
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And some morning clues. Thanks; Ernie P.



What aircraft do I describe?



Clues:

1. It was designed as a fighter. That is significant to the story.

2. It was designed by a governmental department.

3. It was then farmed out to a private company for manufacture.

4. But the government built a few as well.

5. And the manufacturer selected added in some wrinkles of its own.

6. By the time it was all done, there were nearly as many variants as aircraft produced.

7. Even though a single variant accounted for the majority of the small production run.

8. The service which needed the fighter simply didn’t have any fighters of their own.

9. So, they designed their own.

10. They designed an aircraft with a feature not unique, but certainly unusual.

11. The first aircraft delivered had wheels.

12. Which was entirely appropriate for the intended use.

13. So the owning service promptly designed a set of floats for it.

14. Which was also appropriate for its use.

15. The owning service built several planes themselves, to see if they could do so at a competitive cost.

16. And then it build several more to test different engines.

17. The manufacturer then built a couple more, but made them all metal designs.

18. And a couple more were built as racers.
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Old 11-14-2017, 09:44 AM
  #15016
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And some for the afternoon. Thanks; Ernie P.



What aircraft do I describe?



Clues:

1. It was designed as a fighter. That is significant to the story.

2. It was designed by a governmental department.

3. It was then farmed out to a private company for manufacture.

4. But the government built a few as well.

5. And the manufacturer selected added in some wrinkles of its own.

6. By the time it was all done, there were nearly as many variants as aircraft produced.

7. Even though a single variant accounted for the majority of the small production run.

8. The service which needed the fighter simply didn’t have any fighters of their own.

9. So, they designed their own.

10. They designed an aircraft with a feature not unique, but certainly unusual.

11. The first aircraft delivered had wheels.

12. Which was entirely appropriate for the intended use.

13. So the owning service promptly designed a set of floats for it.

14. Which was also appropriate for its use.

15. The owning service built several planes themselves, to see if they could do so at a competitive cost.

16. And then it build several more to test different engines.

17. The manufacturer then built a couple more, but made them all metal designs.

18. And a couple more were built as racers.

19. It was in service for only seven years.

20. But that wasn’t all that unusual for the time.

21. It was not liked by all who flew it. The short wheel struts, and the short distance between the wheels themselves, caused some issues with ground looping.
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Old 11-14-2017, 09:10 PM
  #15017
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And a few more for the (late) evening. Thanks; Ernie P.



What aircraft do I describe?



Clues:

1. It was designed as a fighter. That is significant to the story.

2. It was designed by a governmental department.

3. It was then farmed out to a private company for manufacture.

4. But the government built a few as well.

5. And the manufacturer selected added in some wrinkles of its own.

6. By the time it was all done, there were nearly as many variants as aircraft produced.

7. Even though a single variant accounted for the majority of the small production run.

8. The service which needed the fighter simply didn’t have any fighters of their own.

9. So, they designed their own.

10. They designed an aircraft with a feature not unique, but certainly unusual.

11. The first aircraft delivered had wheels.

12. Which was entirely appropriate for the intended use.

13. So the owning service promptly designed a set of floats for it.

14. Which was also appropriate for its use.

15. The owning service built several planes themselves, to see if they could do so at a competitive cost.

16. And then it build several more to test different engines.

17. The manufacturer then built a couple more, but made them all metal designs.

18. And a couple more were built as racers.

19. It was in service for only seven years.

20. But that wasn’t all that unusual for the time.

21. It was not liked by all who flew it. The short wheel struts, and the short distance between the wheels themselves, caused some issues with ground looping.

22. The position of the lower wing, not being directly connected to the fuselage, made the short wheel struts necessary.

23. It was flown from carriers and, in its floatplane configuration, from other ships.

24. It was a single seater.
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Old 11-15-2017, 03:23 AM
  #15018
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And a few morning clues. Thanks; Ernie P.



What aircraft do I describe?



Clues:

1. It was designed as a fighter. That is significant to the story.

2. It was designed by a governmental department.

3. It was then farmed out to a private company for manufacture.

4. But the government built a few as well.

5. And the manufacturer selected added in some wrinkles of its own.

6. By the time it was all done, there were nearly as many variants as aircraft produced.

7. Even though a single variant accounted for the majority of the small production run.

8. The service which needed the fighter simply didn’t have any fighters of their own.

9. So, they designed their own.

10. They designed an aircraft with a feature not unique, but certainly unusual.

11. The first aircraft delivered had wheels.

12. Which was entirely appropriate for the intended use.

13. So the owning service promptly designed a set of floats for it.

14. Which was also appropriate for its use.

15. The owning service built several planes themselves, to see if they could do so at a competitive cost.

16. And then it build several more to test different engines.

17. The manufacturer then built a couple more, but made them all metal designs.

18. And a couple more were built as racers.

19. It was in service for only seven years.

20. But that wasn’t all that unusual for the time.

21. It was not liked by all who flew it. The short wheel struts, and the short distance between the wheels themselves, caused some issues with ground looping.

22. The position of the lower wing, not being directly connected to the fuselage, made the short wheel struts necessary.

23. It was flown from carriers and, in its floatplane configuration, from other ships.

24. It was a single seater.

25. Armed with a single .30 caliber machine gun.

26. It initially used a radial engine, then other engines were tried.
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Old 11-15-2017, 06:25 AM
  #15019
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What the hey; a couple more for S&G. Thanks; Ernie P.



What aircraft do I describe?



Clues:

1. It was designed as a fighter. That is significant to the story.

2. It was designed by a governmental department.

3. It was then farmed out to a private company for manufacture.

4. But the government built a few as well.

5. And the manufacturer selected added in some wrinkles of its own.

6. By the time it was all done, there were nearly as many variants as aircraft produced.

7. Even though a single variant accounted for the majority of the small production run.

8. The service which needed the fighter simply didn’t have any fighters of their own.

9. So, they designed their own.

10. They designed an aircraft with a feature not unique, but certainly unusual.

11. The first aircraft delivered had wheels.

12. Which was entirely appropriate for the intended use.

13. So the owning service promptly designed a set of floats for it.

14. Which was also appropriate for its use.

15. The owning service built several planes themselves, to see if they could do so at a competitive cost.

16. And then it build several more to test different engines.

17. The manufacturer then built a couple more, but made them all metal designs.

18. And a couple more were built as racers.

19. It was in service for only seven years.

20. But that wasn’t all that unusual for the time.
21. It was not liked by all who flew it. The short wheel struts, and the short distance between the wheels themselves, caused some issues with ground looping.

22. The position of the lower wing, not being directly connected to the fuselage, made the short wheel struts necessary.

23. It was flown from carriers and, in its floatplane configuration, from other ships.

24. It was a single seater.

25. Armed with a single .30 caliber machine gun.

26. It initially used a radial engine, then other engines were tried.

27. Some later variants eliminated the suspended lower wing and carried two machine guns.

28. Did I mention it was a biplane?
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Old 11-15-2017, 07:04 AM
  #15020
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I think I got the TS-1. Originally designed by the Naval Aircraft Factory and handed over to Curtis.
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Old 11-15-2017, 01:00 PM
  #15021
Ernie P.
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyerInOKC View Post
I think I got the TS-1. Originally designed by the Naval Aircraft Factory and handed over to Curtis.
And we have a winner!! Congratulations, FlyerInOKC. Good job. And now you are up. The TS-1 was the very first U.S. Navy aircraft designed as a fighter. With nine separate variants, and a total of 46 aircraft, it must have been confusing. Thanks; Ernie P.



What aircraft do I describe?



Clues:

1. It was designed as a fighter. That is significant to the story.

2. It was designed by a governmental department.

3. It was then farmed out to a private company for manufacture.

4. But the government built a few as well.

5. And the manufacturer selected added in some wrinkles of its own.

6. By the time it was all done, there were nearly as many variants as aircraft produced.



7. Even though a single variant accounted for the majority of the small production run.



8. The service which needed the fighter simply didn’t have any fighters of their own.

9. So, they designed their own.



10. They designed an aircraft with a feature not unique, but certainly unusual.

11. The first aircraft delivered had wheels.



12. Which was entirely appropriate for the intended use.



13. So the owning service promptly designed a set of floats for it.



14. Which was also appropriate for its use.



15. The owning service built several planes themselves, to see if they could do so at a competitive cost.

16. And then it build several more to test different engines.



17. The manufacturer then built a couple more, but made them all metal designs.



18. And a couple more were built as racers.



19. It was in service for only seven years.



20. But that wasn’t all that unusual for the time. 21. It was not liked by all who flew it. The short wheel struts, and the short distance between the wheels themselves, caused some issues with ground looping.

22. The position of the lower wing, not being directly connected to the fuselage, made the short wheel struts necessary. 23. It was flown from carriers and, in its floatplane configuration, from other ships.

24. It was a single seater. 25. Armed with a single .30 caliber machine gun.

26. It initially used a radial engine, then other engines were tried. 27. Some later variants eliminated the suspended lower wing and carried two machine guns.

28. Did I mention it was a biplane?



Answer: The Curtiss TS-1.



The Curtiss TS-1.The Naval Aircraft Factory TS-1 was an early biplanefighter aircraft of the United States Navy, serving from 1922-1929.

Development

While the Vought VE-7s were serving the Navy well in the early 1920s, they were not originally designed as fighters. The Naval Aircraft Factory came up with a simple design driven by a 200 hp (150 kW) Lawrance J-1 air-cooled radial engine. Its boxy fuselage was suspended between the upper and lower wings (essentially having both dorsal and ventral sets of cabane struts), with the center area of the lower wing enlarged to accommodate a fuel tank. The NAF provided Curtiss with the plans to build the aircraft, and the result, designated TS-1, arrived at Anacostia on May 9, 1922. The TS-1 from Curtiss was delivered with wheels, so the NAF also designed wooden floats to enable their use on vessels other than aircraft carriers. Testing went well, and in late 1922 the Navy ordered 34 planes from Curtiss, with the first arriving on board the USS Langley (CV-1) in December. The NAF built another five themselves, as a test of relative costs, as well as four more used to experiment with water-cooled inline engines. Two all-metal versions of the aircraft, F4C-1s, were developed by Curtiss. This aircraft made its first flight on September 4, 1924. The wings had tubular spars and stamped duraluminum ribs, the fuselage was constructed of duraluminum tubing in a Warren truss form. Compared to the TS-1, the lower wing was raised to the base of the fuselage. The F4C-1 was armed with two .30 in (7.62 mm) machine guns and was powered by a 200-hp nine-cylinder Wright J-3 radial.

Operational history

In addition to operating from the carrier deck, the TS-1s served for several years in floatplane configuration aboard destroyers, cruisers, and battleships. The aircraft were slung over the side by crane. Squadron VO-1 operated this way from 1922, and VF-1 flew its float-equipped TS-1s from battleships in 1925 and 1926. The TS-1 was not universally liked by its crews. Positioning of the lower wing below the fuselage resulted in short wheel struts. This, and the wheel's placement close to each other caused considerable problems with ground looping.

Variants

NAF TS-1

five built

[img]file:///C:/Users/Ernie/AppData/Local/Temp/msohtmlclip1/01/clip_image002.jpg[/img]

Curtiss TS-1

Curtiss TS-1

34 built

NAF TS-2

two built, 240 hp (180 kW) Aeromarine engine

NAF TS-3

two built, 180 hp (130 kW) Wright-Hispano E engine

[img]file:///C:/Users/Ernie/AppData/Local/Temp/msohtmlclip1/01/clip_image004.jpg[/img]The first F4C-1 in 1924. [img]file:///C:/Users/Ernie/AppData/Local/Temp/msohtmlclip1/01/clip_image006.jpg[/img]

An F4C-1

NAF TR-2one built, TS-3 modified by changing the airfoil section on the wings for the 1922 Curtiss Marine Trophy raceCurtiss-Hall F4C-1two built all metal versions for comparison to the original wood and wire construction

Operators

[img]file:///C:/Users/Ernie/AppData/Local/Temp/msohtmlclip1/01/clip_image008.jpg[/img] United States

Survivors

Specifications (TS-1)

Data from Gordon Swanborough, Peter M. Bowers: United States Navy aircraft since 1911. Naval Institute Press, Annapolis 1990 (ISBN0-87021-792-5), p. 370. General characteristics
  • Crew: one
  • Length: 22 ft 1 in (6.7 m)
  • Wingspan: 25 ft (7.62 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 7 in (2.9 m)
  • Wing area: 228 ft² (21 m²)
  • Empty weight: 1,240 lb (562.5 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 2,133 lb (967.5 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Lawrance J-1 radial, 200 hp (149 kW)


Performance Armament
1 fixed forward-firing 0.3 in
Browning machine gun
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Old 11-15-2017, 01:37 PM
  #15022
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OK here we go, good luck to one and all.
What airplane do I describe.

1. The name is quite well known aviation enthusiasts but is probably not easily recognized by the general public..
2. it is a single seat Warbird.
3. It is a monoplane
4. the airplane was introduced 16 months after its first flight.
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Old 11-15-2017, 07:06 PM
  #15023
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Clue 4 means it can't be the F-117, am I right?
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Old 11-15-2017, 08:44 PM
  #15024
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It is NOT the F-117.

Your reward another clue!

What airplane do I describe.

1. The name is quite well known aviation enthusiasts but is probably not easily recognized by the general public..
2. it is a single seat Warbird.
3. It is a monoplane
4. the airplane was introduced 16 months after its first flight.
5. It was used by the country of origin and 5 others.
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Old Yesterday, 08:23 AM
  #15025
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Time for another clue! Just to keep things moving I'll give you a double dose.

What airplane do I describe?

1. The name is quite well known aviation enthusiasts but is probably not easily recognized by the general public..
2. it is a single seat Warbird.
3. It is a monoplane
4. the airplane was introduced 16 months after its first flight.
5. It was used by the country of origin and 5 others.
6. The airplane in question served in both war time and peace time.
7. The last country to retire this Warbird did so more than 10 years after the first flight.
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