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Old 01-22-2018, 11:32 AM
  #15301  
Top_Gunn
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Nieuport 17?
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Old 01-22-2018, 05:46 PM
  #15302  
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Originally Posted by Top_Gunn View Post
Nieuport 17?
Now, see? That's the answer I expected to get by clue (6) at the very latest. It is, of course, incorrect. Otherwise, this wouldn't be much of a challenge. But you are on the right track, Top_Gunn; so stick with it. And here's yet another clue to aid your search. Thanks; Ernie P.



What warbird do I describe?



Clues:

1. This aircraft served in WWI.

2. It was a single seat “scout” aircraft.

3. It was powered by a rotary engine.

4. Armament varied; usually one or two machine guns.

5. It was a sesquiplane design.

6. The wing area was just under fifteen (15) square meters.

7. The design was sound, but production was delayed by engine production problems.

8. By the time the plane was available in significant numbers, it was on the verge of being obsolescent.

9. It was a “vee strutter”.

10. It served as an advanced trainer after being withdrawn from front line service.

11. It was largely overshadowed by the arrival of a famous plane of much superior capability.

12. The performance figures available are somewhat suspect; and appear to have been drawn from one of the earlier designs of the plane from which its design was drawn.
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Old 01-23-2018, 08:53 AM
  #15303  
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Newport 10

Sparky
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Old 01-23-2018, 12:42 PM
  #15304  
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Originally Posted by elmshoot View Post
Newport 10

Sparky
Not the Nieuport 10; or even the 11. But you're at least on the right trail; although chasing the wrong deer. Here's a new clue for today. Thanks; Ernie P.



What warbird do I describe?



Clues:

1. This aircraft served in WWI.

2. It was a single seat “scout” aircraft.

3. It was powered by a rotary engine.

4. Armament varied; usually one or two machine guns.

5. It was a sesquiplane design.

6. The wing area was just under fifteen (15) square meters.

7. The design was sound, but production was delayed by engine production problems.

8. By the time the plane was available in significant numbers, it was on the verge of being obsolescent.

9. It was a “vee strutter”.

10. It served as an advanced trainer after being withdrawn from front line service.

11. It was largely overshadowed by the arrival of a famous plane of much superior capability.

12. The performance figures available are somewhat suspect; and appear to have been drawn from one of the earlier designs of the plane from which its design was drawn.

13. Its design was dictated by the ascendancy of an enemy aircraft which was dominant at the time.
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Old 01-24-2018, 07:09 AM
  #15305  
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Morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.



What warbird do I describe?



Clues:

1. This aircraft served in WWI.

2. It was a single seat “scout” aircraft.

3. It was powered by a rotary engine.

4. Armament varied; usually one or two machine guns.

5. It was a sesquiplane design.

6. The wing area was just under fifteen (15) square meters.

7. The design was sound, but production was delayed by engine production problems.

8. By the time the plane was available in significant numbers, it was on the verge of being obsolescent.

9. It was a “vee strutter”.

10. It served as an advanced trainer after being withdrawn from front line service.

11. It was largely overshadowed by the arrival of a famous plane of much superior capability.

12. The performance figures available are somewhat suspect; and appear to have been drawn from one of the earlier designs of the plane from which its design was drawn.

13. Its design was dictated by the ascendancy of an enemy aircraft which was dominant at the time.

14. This aircraft first appeared in mid-1917.
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Old 01-24-2018, 11:53 AM
  #15306  
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Afternoon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.



What warbird do I describe?



Clues:

1. This aircraft served in WWI.

2. It was a single seat “scout” aircraft.

3. It was powered by a rotary engine.

4. Armament varied; usually one or two machine guns.

5. It was a sesquiplane design.

6. The wing area was just under fifteen (15) square meters.

7. The design was sound, but production was delayed by engine production problems.

8. By the time the plane was available in significant numbers, it was on the verge of being obsolescent.

9. It was a “vee strutter”.

10. It served as an advanced trainer after being withdrawn from front line service.

11. It was largely overshadowed by the arrival of a famous plane of much superior capability.

12. The performance figures available are somewhat suspect; and appear to have been drawn from one of the earlier designs of the plane from which its design was drawn.

13. Its design was dictated by the ascendancy of an enemy aircraft which was dominant at the time.

14. This aircraft first appeared in mid-1917.

15. The engine was a rotary type producing 110 H.P.
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Old 01-24-2018, 06:15 PM
  #15307  
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Siemens-Schuckert D.I ?
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Old 01-25-2018, 02:15 AM
  #15308  
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Originally Posted by SimonCraig1 View Post
Siemens-Schuckert D.I ?
Now see? That was pretty easy, wasn't it? The Siemens-Schuckert D.1 was a straight out copy of the famous Nieuport 17. It differed greatly in only one respect; the choice of engine. And that didn't work out well. All in all, a fascinating aircraft. And now, you are up SimonCraig1. Thanks; Ernie P.



What warbird do I describe?



Clues:

1. This aircraft served in WWI.

2. It was a single seat “scout” aircraft.

3. It was powered by a rotary engine.

4. Armament varied; usually one or two machine guns.

5. It was a sesquiplane design.

6. The wing area was just under fifteen (15) square meters.

7. The design was sound, but production was delayed by engine production problems.

8. By the time the plane was available in significant numbers, it was on the verge of being obsolescent.

9. It was a “vee strutter”.

10. It served as an advanced trainer after being withdrawn from front line service.

11. It was largely overshadowed by the arrival of a famous plane of much superior capability.

12. The performance figures available are somewhat suspect; and appear to have been drawn from one of the earlier designs of the plane from which its design was drawn.

13. Its design was dictated by the ascendancy of an enemy aircraft which was dominant at the time.

14. This aircraft first appeared in mid-1917.

15. The engine was a rotary type producing 110 H.P.

16. But a rather unusual, and difficult to produce, rotary engine.

17. By the time it was ready for combat, other, superior, aircraft were already available.

18. So, less than 100 were produced.

19. The interplane struts were tube steel; with wood fairings.

20. Large, pointed propeller spinners were used.


Answer: The Siemens-Schuckert D.1 The Siemens-Schuckert D.I was a single-seat fighter built by Siemens-Schuckert Werke in 1916. It was a German copy of the French Nieuport 17 that was obsolete by the time it was available in numbers, so that it served mainly as an advanced trainer.
Design and development

The French Nieuport 17 fighter, which reached the front in March 1916, established such ascendency over existing German fighters that captured examples were supplied to several German aircraft manufacturers with a request to "study" the type. The Siemens-Schuckert Werke produced the D.I, based very closely on the Nieuport. The most important difference from the Nieuport 17 was the powerplant - instead of the Le Rhone 9J of the Nieuport (licensed and un-licensed versions of which were actually available in Germany at the time), Siemens-Schukert chose to use their own 110 hp (82 kW) Siemens-Halske Sh.I rotary engine - in which the cylinders, still attached to the propeller, rotated at 900 rpm in one direction, with the crankshaft and internals rotating in the opposite direction at the same rate: producing an effective 1800 rpm. Visually, the effect of this was that in place of the Nieuport 17's circular, fully "closed" cowling the D.I had a small, close fitting, semi-circular cowling with an open bottom, to allow adequate cooling for the slow revving Siemens-Halske. This gives some photographs of the type the appearance of the earlier Nieuport 11. The wing area (14.4 m²) was a little less than the famous 15 m² of the Nieuport - the gap between the wings was reduced slightly, and the interplane struts were of steel tube, with broad wooden fairings, in place of the tape wrapped wooden struts of the original.
Production history

An order for 150 aircraft for the Luftstreitkräfte was placed on 25 November 1916, but initial deliveries were slow, due to production difficulties with the complicated geared engines, so that the type was not available for service until well into 1917, by which time many Jagdstaffeln were already equipped with the very much superior Albatros D.III. A backup order for a further 100 machines, placed on 21 March 1917, was cancelled, and only 95 were produced in total. Late production models were fitted with modified tailskids, and had large pointed spinners on their propellers.
Operational History

The S.S.W. D.I was obsolete before it was available in numbers, so that most of the examples produced were sent to the fighter training schools, although a few Jastas received one or two examples during 1917. The type is poorly documented - in particular no reliable details are available for its performance: the published figures are essentially those of the Nieuport 11, whereas such a close copy of the 17, with a powerplant of similar output, might have been expected to have a performance roughly equivalent to that of the original from which it was derived.
Variants

A single D.Ia was produced with a greater wing area - two examples of the D.Ib had a higher compression version of the Siemens-Halske Sh.I. Neither was ordered into production. Development continued through a series of D.II prototypes to the Siemens-Schuckert D.III.
Specifications(D.I)

Data from The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft (Part Work 1982-1985), German Aircraft of the First World WarGeneral characteristics· Crew: One· Length: 6.0 m (19 ft 8¼ in)· Wingspan: 7.50 m (24 ft 7⅜ in)· Height: 2.59 m [2] (8 ft 5⅞ in)· Wing area: 14.4 m² (156 sq ft)· Empty weight: 430 kg (946 lb)· Loaded weight: 675 kg (1,485 lb)· Powerplant: 1 × Siemens-Halske Sh.I geared rotary engine, 110 hp (82 kW) Performance· Maximum speed: 155 km/h (84 knots, 97 mph)· Endurance: 2 h 20 min· Climb to 4,000 m (13,125 ft): 24 min 18 s Armament· One or two 7.92 mmLMG 08/15machine guns
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Old 01-25-2018, 05:50 AM
  #15309  
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Way to go SimonCraig!
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Old 01-25-2018, 10:01 AM
  #15310  
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That took a lot of searching, I try and get a clue up shortly.
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Old 01-25-2018, 10:43 AM
  #15311  
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Extra bonus! While researching this question I found an amazing web site I'll share with you one the clues are solved.

I'm looking for a pilot:
1. While he flew many operational flights he is better known for other skills he applied to flying.
2. On one operation he was shot down but manage to evade capture and eventually was able to resume his active duties.
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Old 01-25-2018, 12:07 PM
  #15312  
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This looks like it's going to be fun!
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Old 01-25-2018, 03:12 PM
  #15313  
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I'm looking for a pilot:
1. While he flew many operational flights he is better known for other skills he applied to flying.
2. On one operation he was shot down but manage to evade capture and eventually was able to resume his active duties.
3. He flew an unusual aircraft configuration while working for a civil airline.
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Old 01-25-2018, 07:20 PM
  #15314  
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I'm looking for a pilot:
1. While he flew many operational flights he is better known for other skills he applied to flying.
2. On one operation he was shot down but manage to evade capture and eventually was able to resume his active duties.
3. He flew an unusual aircraft configuration while working for a civil airline.
4. Early in his war, he set up a system to help ensure the ongoing supply of aircraft for his air force.
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Old 01-26-2018, 06:09 AM
  #15315  
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How about D.C.T. Bennett, who devised the first (I think) ferry route across the North Atlantic early in WWII?
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Old 01-26-2018, 07:00 AM
  #15316  
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Karl Richthofen?
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Old 01-26-2018, 10:21 AM
  #15317  
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Originally Posted by Top_Gunn View Post
How about D.C.T. Bennett, who devised the first (I think) ferry route across the North Atlantic early in WWII?
Well that did not take long.... Don Bennett it is. Navigation and instrument flying expert, famous for forming and leading the RAF Bomber Command Path Finder Force. The ferry system was arguably more important to the war effort than the formation of the Path Finder Force, given the time when it occurred. The unusual configuration was the Short Mayo/Mercury composite flying boat and the target he was shot down over was the Turpitz battleship then moored in Norway.

This is the web site I referred to: https://www.webofstories.com/storytellers it is a series of video recordings of reminiscences of well known scientist and other notable people. Given their ages there are several WW2 descriptions that are worth listening to. Bernard Lovell on developing airborne radar; Ken Adams on almost shooting himself down firing rockets from a Typhoon. Mostly they are not war related but engrossing nevertheless, the discovery of DNA and Pulsars for instance not to mention Stan Lee describing how he spoofed DC superheros.

You're up Top_Gunn
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Old 01-26-2018, 03:12 PM
  #15318  
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Interesting that two of Australia's best-known pilots, Bennett and Sir Patrick Gordon Taylor, became famous as much for being outstanding navigators as for their flying. This may have had something to do with the fact that a lot of early long-distance flying in Australia was over oceans, which posed more-serious navigational difficulties and perhaps heavier penalties for navigational mistakes than a lot of flying over land in the early days of aviation.

I have a plane in mind for a quiz, but need some time to think of questions. Back tomorrow.
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Old 01-26-2018, 09:21 PM
  #15319  
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Originally Posted by elmshoot View Post
Karl Richthofen?
Sparky
Sparky; I have to ask. Where did that answer come from? I'm assuming you mean Karl Bolko von Richthofen, although I may be wrong. I'm not aware of any real aviation innovations by the gentleman. Am I wrong? Thanks; Ernie P.
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Old 01-26-2018, 09:32 PM
  #15320  
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I think you got the name right. As I understand it he was a cousin of the red baron. While A pilot he was also largely responsible for developing the logistics for the invasion of Russia.
I am listening to a book on tape it is a collection of interviews from 4 German aces Kapinski and Galand so far. Kapinski mentioned what a brilliant job he did. They didn't anticipate the invasion lasting through the winter....
Oops I cant mention this next part as it will be the subject of my quiz when I get a chance.
Needless to say there were gallant pilots on both sides of the battles.
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Old 01-27-2018, 05:18 AM
  #15321  
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Looking for the name of an airplane.

1. Not many produced: Under 200, which was very few for a successful airplane of its type at the time.

2. But the low production number was not was not due to poor performance.
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Old 01-27-2018, 07:13 AM
  #15322  
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Originally Posted by elmshoot View Post
I think you got the name right. As I understand it he was a cousin of the red baron. While A pilot he was also largely responsible for developing the logistics for the invasion of Russia.
I am listening to a book on tape it is a collection of interviews from 4 German aces Kapinski and Galand so far. Kapinski mentioned what a brilliant job he did. They didn't anticipate the invasion lasting through the winter....
Oops I cant mention this next part as it will be the subject of my quiz when I get a chance.
Needless to say there were gallant pilots on both sides of the battles.
Sparky
Sparky; The Red Baron had several cousins, so I'm not exactly sure if you're thinking about the right cousin. As I pointed out in this forum a few years ago, the reason the Red baron pursued Lt. May so arduously in the combat in which he was killed, could have been because May had attacked the Baron's cousin; who was engaged in his first combat.

Richthofen received a fatal wound just after 11:00 am on 21 April 1918 while flying over Morlancourt Ridge near the Somme River, 49°56′0.60″N 2°32′43.71″E. At the time, he had been pursuing a Sopwith Camel at very low altitude, piloted by novice Canadian pilot Lieutenant Wilfrid "Wop" May of No. 209 Squadron, Royal Air Force.[47] May had just fired on the Red Baron's cousin Lt. Wolfram von Richthofen. On seeing his cousin being attacked, Manfred flew to his rescue and fired on May, causing him to pull away and saving Wolfram's life.[48] Richthofen pursued May across the Somme. The Baron was spotted and briefly attacked by a Camel piloted by May's school friend and flight commander, Canadian Captain Arthur "Roy" Brown. Brown had to dive steeply at very high speed to intervene, and then had to climb steeply to avoid hitting the ground.[47] Richthofen turned to avoid this attack, and then resumed his pursuit of May.

This would be the cousin who later became a celebrated Feld Marshal in WWII, and a German hero for organizing things in the Russian Campaign.


Wolfram Freiherr
[Notes 1] von Richthofen
(10 October 1895 – 12 July 1945) was a German field marshal of the Luftwaffe (German Air Force) during World War II. Born in 1895 into a family of the Prussian nobility, Richthofen grew up in prosperous surroundings. At the age of eighteen, after leaving school, he opted to join the German Army rather than choose an academic career, and joined the army's cavalry arm in 1913.


On the outbreak of the First World War, Richthofen fought on the Western Front, winning the Iron Cross Second Class. In 1915 he was posted to the Eastern Front, where he stayed until 1917. The Richthofen family produced several notable personalities that would become famous during the First War. His cousins, the brothers Lothar and Manfred von Richthofen both became flying aces and they encouraged him to join the Luftstreitkräfte (German Imperial Air Service). He did so, and joined Manfred's Geschwader (Wing), Jagdgeschwader 1 (Fighter Wing 1). Manfred, known as the Red Baron, was the highest scoring ace of the war, with 80 victories. On his first mission with his cousin, on 21 April 1918, Manfred was killed. Wolfram continued flying and went on to claim eight aerial victories before the armistice in November 1918. Lothar survived the war but was killed in a flying accident in 1922.

When the Second World War broke out in September 1939, Richthofen commanded a specialised ground-attack air unit, Fliegerkorps VIII (8th Air Corps), first as a small active service unit in the Polish Campaign, and then as a full-sized Air Corps in Western Europe, from May to June 1940. The effectiveness of his units proved decisive at certain points in the French Campaign, particularly covering the German thrust to the English Channel. He was awarded the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross on 23 May 1940, in view of his achievements. He continued in frontline service during the Battle of Britain and the Balkans Campaign in 1940 and 1941.

Richthofen achieved his greatest success on the Eastern Front. In particular, he achieved notable success in the Crimean Campaigns during 1942. Despite offering vital tactical and operational support to Army Group South, after the victory at the Third Battle of Kharkov he was moved to the Mediterranean Theatre of Operations, where he commanded Luftwaffe forces in the Italian Campaign. He remained in active service until late 1944, when he was retired on medical grounds. Soon after the capitulation of Germany in May 1945, he was taken prisoner by the United States Army, but on 12 July he died in captivity of a brain tumour.



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Old 01-28-2018, 06:17 AM
  #15323  
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Today's clues:

Looking for the name of an airplane.

1. Not many produced: Under 200, which was very few for a successful airplane of its type at the time.

2. But the low production number was not was not due to poor performance.

3. It was fast, maneuverable, and heavily armed.

4. Crew of one.
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Old 01-28-2018, 02:30 PM
  #15324  
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Originally Posted by Top_Gunn View Post
Today's clues:

Looking for the name of an airplane.

1. Not many produced: Under 200, which was very few for a successful airplane of its type at the time.

2. But the low production number was not was not due to poor performance.

3. It was fast, maneuverable, and heavily armed.

4. Crew of one.
The most likely explanation of the low production figure is either an Emergency Fighter, or one where time simply ran out and the war ended. So, how about the CAC Boomerang? Thanks; Ernie P.

The CAC Boomerang was a fighter aircraft designed and manufactured in Australia by the Commonwealth Aircraft Corporation between 1942 and 1945. Approved for production shortly following the Empire of Japan's entry into the Second World War, the Boomerang was rapidly designed as to meet the urgent demands for fighter aircraft to equip the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF). The type holds the distinction of being the first combat aircraft to be both designed and constructed in Australia.

Different variants of the Boomerang were manufactured under a series of corresponding production contract numbers CA-12, CA-13, CA-14 and CA-19, the aircraft supplied under each subsequent contract would incorporate various modifications, typically aimed at improving the aircraft's performance. The effectiveness of the Boomerang has been contested, the aircraft proving to be slower than contemporary fighter aircraft and thus rarely engaging in aerial combat. During early wartime operations, the Boomerang was mainly dispatched to equip home-based squadrons, freeing up other fighters for use elsewhere overseas. In later service, the Boomerang would commonly be used for ground support duties, cooperating with Allied army units, in addition to secondary roles such as aerial reconnaissance and air sea rescue.
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Old 01-28-2018, 02:58 PM
  #15325  
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Those are good explanations for a low production figure. But neither of them applies to this airplane. New clue:

Looking for the name of an airplane.

1. Not many produced: Under 200, which was very few for a successful airplane of its type at the time.

2. But the low production number was not was not due to poor performance.

3. It was fast, maneuverable, and heavily armed.

4. Crew of one.

5. Although few were produced, the plane's wartime service lasted a little over two years.

Last edited by Top_Gunn; 01-28-2018 at 03:01 PM.
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