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Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

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Old 03-07-2018, 08:11 PM
  #15501  
Ernie P.
 
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Evening clue. Thanks; Ernie P.



What WWI warbird pilot do I describe?

1. He did not become a pilot until late in 1917.

2. He scored his first victory early in 1918.

3. He was barely in the top 40 on some lists.

4. And barely in the top five on another list.

5. But most assuredly on the top of one list of aces.

6. He was the highest scoring ace in his category.
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Old 03-08-2018, 05:53 AM
  #15502  
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Morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.



What WWI warbird pilot do I describe?

1. He did not become a pilot until late in 1917.

2. He scored his first victory early in 1918.

3. He was barely in the top 40 on some lists.

4. And barely in the top five on another list.

5. But most assuredly on the top of one list of aces.

6. He was the highest scoring ace in his category.

7. His first victory came a few months after he started his flying career.
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Old 03-08-2018, 11:19 AM
  #15503  
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I'll take a stab: Léon Bourjade top French balloon buster and second only to the legendary Willy Coppens
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Old 03-08-2018, 11:23 AM
  #15504  
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Originally Posted by SimonCraig1 View Post
I'll take a stab: Léon Bourjade top French balloon buster and second only to the legendary Willy Coppens
Good guess, SimonbCraig1; but not correct. Here's a bonus clue for your efforts. Thanks; Ernie P.



What WWI warbird pilot do I describe?

1. He did not become a pilot until late in 1917.

2. He scored his first victory early in 1918.

3. He was barely in the top 40 on some lists.

4. And barely in the top five on another list.

5. But most assuredly on the top of one list of aces.

6. He was the highest scoring ace in his category.

7. His first victory came a few months after he started his flying career.

8. And in less than three months, he scored eight more.
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Old 03-08-2018, 02:26 PM
  #15505  
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Just a guess: Charles Gass, top scoring observer?I think the Wiki list has him just under the top five of British aces, but WWI scores vary some from one list to another, so I figured a little leeway shouldn't keep me from tossing out his name. Also, I couldn't for the life of me find anything online that said when he became a pilot.
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Old 03-08-2018, 02:51 PM
  #15506  
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Originally Posted by Top_Gunn View Post
Just a guess: Charles Gass, top scoring observer?I think the Wiki list has him just under the top five of British aces, but WWI scores vary some from one list to another, so I figured a little leeway shouldn't keep me from tossing out his name. Also, I couldn't for the life of me find anything online that said when he became a pilot.
Top_Gunn; this was a pilot, not an observer. With that said, you may be closer than you think. And here's another clue to aid your search. Thanks; Ernie P.



What WWI warbird pilot do I describe?

1. He did not become a pilot until late in 1917.

2. He scored his first victory early in 1918.

3. He was barely in the top 40 on some lists.

4. And barely in the top five on another list.

5. But most assuredly on the top of one list of aces.

6. He was the highest scoring ace in his category.

7. His first victory came a few months after he started his flying career.

8. And in less than three months, he scored eight more.

9. Then, a couple of weeks later, he shot down five enemy aircraft in a single engagement.
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Old 03-08-2018, 03:16 PM
  #15507  
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Ah, I overlooked the "looking for a pilot" line. How about Alfred Atkey, then? Became an ace in a day (along with Gass, who was his observer) in 1918. Fifth highest scoring Canadian pilot, and highest scoring pilot of a two-seater airplane?
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Old 03-08-2018, 08:27 PM
  #15508  
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Originally Posted by Top_Gunn View Post
Ah, I overlooked the "looking for a pilot" line. How about Alfred Atkey, then? Became an ace in a day (along with Gass, who was his observer) in 1918. Fifth highest scoring Canadian pilot, and highest scoring pilot of a two-seater airplane?
And there we have it!! Good job, Top_Gunn. Atkey scored a lot of victories in a very short time. And now you are up, Sir. Thanks; Ernie P.



What WWI warbird pilot do I describe?

1. He did not become a pilot until late in 1917.

2. He scored his first victory early in 1918.

3. He was barely in the top 40 on some lists.

4. And barely in the top five on another list.

5. But most assuredly on the top of one list of aces.

6. He was the highest scoring ace in his category.

7. His first victory came a few months after he started his flying career.

8. And in less than three months, he scored eight more.

9. Then, a couple of weeks later, he shot down five enemy aircraft in a single engagement.

10. Two days later, he again shot down five enemy aircraft in a single day.

11. In a little over two weeks, he added 19 more to his credit.

12. He was then posted away from the front, into an administrative position.

13. From first to last, his victory string lasted less than four months.

14. It is believed all of his victims were enemy scout aircraft.



Answer: Captain Alfred Clayburn Atkey

Captain Alfred Clayburn Atkey MC & Bar (16 August 1894 – 14 February 1971) was a Canadian First World War flying ace, officially credited with thirty-eight aerial victories, making him the fifth highest scoring Canadian ace. However, all those above him flew in single-seat fighters, whereas Atkey gained all his victories in heavier two-seater aircraft, becoming the highest scoring two-seater pilot of the war.



Atkey was born in Toronto, Ontario, the second of five children born to Alfred Atkey, a builder and farmer, and his wife Annie Evelyn (née Shaw). His grandfather, also Alfred, was born in Newport, Isle of Wight, in 1848, and had emigrated to Canada with his parents in the 1850s. In 1906, his family moved west to Nunebor, Saskatchewan. Atkey later returned to Toronto to work for the Toronto Evening Telegram as a journalist.



Atkey enlisted into the British Army, joining the 2/24th Battalion, London Regiment, a Territorial Force unit that was stationed in England until sent to France in June 1916. On 19 October 1916 Atkey was commissioned as a second lieutenant (on probation) in the Royal Flying Corps, and was confirmed in his rank in September 1917. He was then posted to No. 18 Squadron to fly the Airco DH.4 day bomber. He and his gunners claimed nine victories between 4 February and 21 April 1918.



He was then transferred to No. 22 Squadron to fly the Bristol F.2b fighter/reconnaissance aircraft in "A" Flight, paired with Lieutenant Charles George Gass as his gunner/observer. On 7 May 1918 Atkey and Gass took part in an historic dogfight north-east of Arras, known as the "Two Against Twenty", when Atkey and Gass, with John Gurdon and Anthony Thornton, fought twenty German scout aircraft. Atkey and Gass shot down five enemy aircraft while Gurdon and Thornton accounted for three. Two days later, Atkey and Gass again shot down five enemy aircraft in a single day. The next day, 10 May, Atkey was appointed a flight commander with the acting rank of captain. Atkey claimed a further 19 aircraft between 15 May and 2 June 1918, and was then was posted to back to the Home Establishment in England.





Atkey was subsequently twice awarded the Military Cross.





The first was gazetted on 22 June 1918. His citation read:Second Lieutenant Alfred Clayburn Atkey, RFC, Special Reserve. "For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When engaged on reconnaissance and bombing work, he attacked four scouts, one of which he shot down in flames. Shortly afterwards he attacked four two-seater planes, one of which he brought down out of control. On two previous occasions his formation was attacked by superior numbers of the enemy, three of whom in all were shot down out of control. He has shown exceptional ability and initiative on all occasions."





His second was gazetted on 13 September 1918:Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) Alfred Clayburn Atkey, MC, RAF. "For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During recent operations he destroyed seven enemy machines. When engaged with enemy aircraft, often far superior in numbers, he proved himself a brilliant fighting pilot, and displayed dash and gallantry of a high order."





Atkey was transferred to the RAF unemployed list on 3 May 1919.





In March 1919 Atkey married Irene E. Marshall (b. 1900 in London, England) in Portsmouth, Hampshire. They moved to the United States, and in 1920 were resident in Brooklyn, New York.

On 23 January 1924, Atkey was living in Los Angeles, employed as a writer, when he filed a "Declaration of Intention", the first step in becoming a naturalized American citizen. In the declaration he stated that he had arrived in Seattle from Vancouver aboard the SS Princess Victoria in November 1923, and had previously resided at North Battleford, Canada, and that his wife was currently living in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.



It is unclear if Atkey actually became an American citizen, but on 26 August 1942 he was married for a second time to Dulcie May Boadway (b. circa 1914) in Toronto, Ontario. They had four children, Alfred (b. 1943), Donna (b. 1945), George (b. 1951) and Susan (b. 1953).



Atkey died in Toronto, on 10 February 1971, and is buried in Springcreek Cemetery, Mississauga, Ontario. His gravestone describes him as a Flying Officer in the Royal Canadian Air Force, though details of his later military service are unknown.
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Old 03-09-2018, 05:43 AM
  #15509  
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Here we go again.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Played a prominent role in a successful and still highly regarded motion picture.

2. Single piston engine.

3. Crew of one or two.
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Old 03-09-2018, 01:40 PM
  #15510  
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D.H. Tiger Moth? Used in many, many, WWI movies...
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Old 03-09-2018, 02:21 PM
  #15511  
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Good guess, but not what I have in mind. So far as I know, this one had a major role in only one movie, though it may have appeared occasionally in others. Here's the additional clue for your guess (though it would fit the Tiger Moth, too).

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Played a prominent role in a successful and still highly regarded motion picture.

2. Single piston engine.

3. Crew of one or two.

4. Fixed landing gear.
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Old 03-09-2018, 02:48 PM
  #15512  
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JN-4 Jenny.
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Old 03-09-2018, 04:05 PM
  #15513  
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Another good guess, but not what I have in mind. So you've earned another clue.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Played a prominent role in a successful and still highly regarded motion picture.

2. Single piston engine.

3. Crew of one or two.

4. Fixed landing gear.

5. Top speed around 100 mph.
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Old 03-10-2018, 05:52 AM
  #15514  
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Another good guess, but not what I have in mind. So you've earned another clue.

This morning's clue:

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Played a prominent role in a successful and still highly regarded motion picture.

2. Single piston engine.

3. Crew of one or two.

4. Fixed landing gear.

5. Top speed around 100 mph.

6. Used by the armed forces of nine countries, and by some civilian users as well. (This includes users of a license-built version with a different engine.)
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Old 03-10-2018, 05:03 PM
  #15515  
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Originally Posted by Top_Gunn View Post
Another good guess, but not what I have in mind. So you've earned another clue.

This morning's clue:

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Played a prominent role in a successful and still highly regarded motion picture.

2. Single piston engine.

3. Crew of one or two.

4. Fixed landing gear.

5. Top speed around 100 mph.

6. Used by the armed forces of nine countries, and by some civilian users as well. (This includes users of a license-built version with a different engine.)
Al; Just for clarification: Are you saying this plane had a single engine that was piston driven? Or that it had an engine with a single piston? Thanks; Ernie P.
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Old 03-10-2018, 06:34 PM
  #15516  
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Single engine, piston driven.
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Old 03-11-2018, 05:09 AM
  #15517  
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This morning's clue:

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Played a prominent role in a successful and still highly regarded motion picture.

2. Single piston engine.

3. Crew of one or two.

4. Fixed landing gear.

5. Top speed around 100 mph.

6. Used by the armed forces of nine countries, and by some civilian users as well. (This includes users of a license-built version with a different engine.

7. In the US, it was used by the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, the Post Office, and a couple of airlines. I haven't been able to find out whether the Post Office itself flew any of these. I know that they had some mail carried on some of them flown by airlines.

Last edited by Top_Gunn; 03-11-2018 at 05:18 AM.
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Old 03-12-2018, 04:21 AM
  #15518  
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This morning's clue, plus an additional sentence tacked on to yesterday's clue. And think about that movie. Chances are you've all seen it, and probably more than once.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Played a prominent role in a successful and still highly regarded motion picture.

2. Single piston engine.

3. Crew of one or two.

4. Fixed landing gear.

5. Top speed around 100 mph.

6. Used by the armed forces of nine countries, and by some civilian users as well. (This includes users of a license-built version with a different engine.)

7. In the US, it was used by the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, the Post Office, and a couple of airlines. I haven't been able to find out whether the Post Office itself flew any of these. I know that they had some mail carried on some of them flown by airlines. This was considered a big deal, at least by post-office standards, at the time.

8. Total production under 400, plus less than 200 of the foreign license-built version.
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Old 03-12-2018, 05:26 AM
  #15519  
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Curtis Model N?
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Old 03-12-2018, 06:25 AM
  #15520  
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Not the Curtiss Model N, but your guess earns you another clue: one that will rule out the Model N, I think.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Played a prominent role in a successful and still highly regarded motion picture.

2. Single piston engine.

3. Crew of one or two.

4. Fixed landing gear.

5. Top speed around 100 mph.

6. Used by the armed forces of nine countries, and by some civilian users as well. (This includes users of a license-built version with a different engine.)

7. In the US, it was used by the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, the Post Office, and a couple of airlines. I haven't been able to find out whether the Post Office itself flew any of these. I know that they had some mail carried on some of them flown by airlines. This was considered a big deal, at least by post-office standards, at the time.

8. Total production under 400, plus less than 200 of the foreign license-built version.

9. All but the earliest versions had tricycle landing gear.
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Old 03-12-2018, 01:45 PM
  #15521  
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This may sound strange but what about the DHC-2 Beaver or the Pilatus PC-6 Porter
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Old 03-12-2018, 02:19 PM
  #15522  
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Originally Posted by Hydro Junkie View Post
This may sound strange but what about the DHC-2 Beaver or the Pilatus PC-6 Porter
Neither of those. New clue tomorrow. Keep trying; I'm running short of clues that don't give everything away.

I will point out that if you combine clues 6, 7, and 8, you end up with users who had a pretty low average number of these apiece. You've got at least seven mentioned users in the US alone, plus several foreign countries, and a low production number.
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Old 03-12-2018, 07:17 PM
  #15523  
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Boeing 40?
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Old 03-13-2018, 07:33 AM
  #15524  
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Not the Boeing 40. Today's clue should narrow the possibilities down some.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Played a prominent role in a successful and still highly regarded motion picture.

2. Single piston engine.

3. Crew of one or two.

4. Fixed landing gear.

5. Top speed around 100 mph.

6. Used by the armed forces of nine countries, and by some civilian users as well. (This includes users of a license-built version with a different engine.)

7. In the US, it was used by the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, the Post Office, and a couple of airlines. I haven't been able to find out whether the Post Office itself flew any of these. I know that they had some mail carried on some of them flown by airlines. This was considered a big deal, at least by post-office standards, at the time.

8. Total production under 400, plus less than 200 of the foreign license-built version.

9. All but the earliest versions had tricycle landing gear.

10. The tricycle gear version, which is the one used in the motion picture and by far the most common, first flew in 1946.
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Old 03-14-2018, 04:18 AM
  #15525  
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Today's clue.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Played a prominent role in a successful and still highly regarded motion picture.

2. Single piston engine.

3. Crew of one or two.

4. Fixed landing gear.

5. Top speed around 100 mph.

6. Used by the armed forces of nine countries, and by some civilian users as well. (This includes users of a license-built version with a different engine.)

7. In the US, it was used by the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, the Post Office, and a couple of airlines. I haven't been able to find out whether the Post Office itself flew any of these. I know that they had some mail carried on some of them flown by airlines. This was considered a big deal, at least by post-office standards, at the time.

8. Total production under 400, plus less than 200 of the foreign license-built version.

9. All but the earliest versions had tricycle landing gear.

10. The tricycle gear version, which is the one used in the motion picture and by far the most common, first flew in 1946.

11. I suppose it's possible that somebody somewhere attached armament to some of them; with nine countries using them there's no way to tell. But they were normally not armed. The one used in the movie and the many that served in the real-life role which that one portrayed were not. Their role was closely related to combat but did not involve shooting people or blowing stuff up. It did sometimes expose its crews to being shot at.
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