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Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

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Old 05-15-2018, 06:35 AM
  #15826  
Ernie P.
 
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Originally Posted by FlyerInOKC View Post
Ok I think I'll take a shot: Heinrich Gontermann
Now there's a good guess, FlyerInOKC; but Gontermann didn't shoot down nearly as many aircraft, and he served a lot longer in combat, than our subject pilot. Perhaps this next clue will help you narrow down the field. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird pilot do I describe?

1. This pilot is, today, almost unknown. Yet he was, in many ways, one of the best there ever was.

2. He was born on a farm.

3. And entered military service at a young age.

4. And originally served, as seems natural, in a cavalry unit.

5. He first saw combat as part of a cavalry unit.

6. He switched his path and became a pilot a couple of years later.

7. He rose through the ranks quickly.

8. By the time he first engaged in air combat, he was already an experienced pilot.

9. He accomplished things in combat that have only been done by a very small handful of men.

10. And he did at least one thing no other pilot, before or since, has accomplished.

11. He did not become an ace on his first combat flight.

12. That had to wait for his second combat flight.

13. Against enemy aircraft considered to be pretty stiff competition.

14. Of course, both flights occurred on the same day.

15. He was the top scoring ace of his service.

16. And was compared to Baron von Richthofen himself.

17. He scored over 50 victories.

18. In a total combat career of three months.

19. It may be that he became too confident of his own abilities.

20. He was shot down and killed.

21. By enemy fighters.

22. After scoring three final victories.

23. While escorting a flight of bombers.

24. He was the highest scoring ace in his conflict.

25. And the highest scoring ace of his particular service.

26. He is one of the very few men who became an “ace in a day”, scoring five or more victories in a single day.

27. He is (I believe) the only pilot to become an ace on his first day in combat. I’m not entirely sure of that claim, though.
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Old 05-15-2018, 11:04 AM
  #15827  
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Afternoon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird pilot do I describe?

1. This pilot is, today, almost unknown. Yet he was, in many ways, one of the best there ever was.

2. He was born on a farm.

3. And entered military service at a young age.

4. And originally served, as seems natural, in a cavalry unit.

5. He first saw combat as part of a cavalry unit.

6. He switched his path and became a pilot a couple of years later.

7. He rose through the ranks quickly.

8. By the time he first engaged in air combat, he was already an experienced pilot.

9. He accomplished things in combat that have only been done by a very small handful of men.

10. And he did at least one thing no other pilot, before or since, has accomplished.

11. He did not become an ace on his first combat flight.

12. That had to wait for his second combat flight.

13. Against enemy aircraft considered to be pretty stiff competition.

14. Of course, both flights occurred on the same day.

15. He was the top scoring ace of his service.

16. And was compared to Baron von Richthofen himself.

17. He scored over 50 victories.

18. In a total combat career of three months.

19. It may be that he became too confident of his own abilities.

20. He was shot down and killed.

21. By enemy fighters.

22. After scoring three final victories.

23. While escorting a flight of bombers.

24. He was the highest scoring ace in his conflict.

25. And the highest scoring ace of his particular service.

26. He is one of the very few men who became an “ace in a day”, scoring five or more victories in a single day.

27. He is (I believe) the only pilot to become an ace on his first day in combat. I’m not entirely sure of that claim, though.

28. He is the only pilot to score a total of ten victories on his first day in combat.
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Old 05-15-2018, 07:18 PM
  #15828  
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Hiromichi Shinohara

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Old 05-16-2018, 02:01 AM
  #15829  
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Originally Posted by elmshoot View Post
Hiromichi Shinohara
You have it, elmshoot. Apparently, cut and paste is currently unavailable right now on RCU, so I will post some background data later. For the moment, please reflect upon how a pilot can shoot down 10 planes on his first day in combat; shoot down 11 planes exactly a month later; and die in combat exactly two months after that; and shoot down 58 planes in three months... and still be a virtual unknown. I can only attribute it to him having served in a war that is itself almost unknown, and overshadowed by the onset of WWII. Thanks; Ernie P.
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Old 05-16-2018, 04:33 AM
  #15830  
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Here you go, Ernie:
In June 1933 he went to the Tokorozawa Flying School (Tokorozawa Rikugun Koku Seibi Gakkō), graduating in January 1934 and he became enlisted as a corporal in the 1st Chutai of the 11th Hiko Datai,[4] posted in Harbin, Manchukuo (Manchuria). By the end of 1938 he had climbed through the ranks, becoming a warrant officer, he was 25 years old and had six years of flying experience by the time the Nomonhan Incident (Battles of Khalkhin Gol) began in May 1939. During his first combat sortie, on 27 May 1939, Shinohara, flying a Nakajima Ki-27, downed four Soviet Polikarpov I-16 fighters,[3] he became an ace within 24 hours, after he claimed six more victories, downing a Polikarpov R-Z reconnaissance plane and five Polikarpov I-15 biplane fighters. No other pilot in history scored 10 victories during his first day of combat, from then on his victories continued, culminating on 27 June 1939 in an Imperial Japanese Army Air Force record of eleven victories in a single day during an air battle over Tamsak-Bulak.[3]
[5]
[6] Only top ace of all time Erich Hartmann (12), Emil Lang (18), Hans-Joachim Marseille (17), Erich Rudorffer (13 in 17 minutes), have surpassed him.Shinohara's luck however ran out on him two months later when on 27 August 1939 he himself was shot down by Soviet Polikarpov I-16 fighters after claiming three victories during a bombing escort mission,[7] his aircraft fell in flames into Mohorehi Lake, ten kilometres south of Abdara Lake. [8]Warrant Officer Hiromichi Shinohara was posthumously promoted to the rank of second lieutenant, having claimed 58 victories in only three months of combat—the last three in the battle that would take him down—earning him the nickname of the Richthofen of the Orient.[5]
[9]
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Old 05-16-2018, 04:49 AM
  #15831  
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There are a few things to remember, when comparing Japanese combat records to those of other countries:
1) The Japanese military set a very high standard of ability that it's pilots had to achieve before they were able to fly in combat. This required almost three times the training of every other military but, at the same time, it limited the number of pilots the Japanese flying schools could produce
2) Japanese fighters were optimized for dogfighting and aerobatic performance. To achieve the required performance, the designers didn't install any armor or self sealing fuel tanks, a weakness that would become exploited by Allied fighter pilots in WWII
3) Japan, like Germany, didn't rotate their pilots back home to rest and train new pilots. This resulted in almost all of the elite prewar pilots being killed in combat by the end of 1943. The last great carrier battle, fought off the Mariana Islands in 1944, had Japanese pilots flying with less than half the training of the prewar pilots
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Old 05-16-2018, 04:57 AM
  #15832  
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I had given up on the clues given until I did a drive by and found some clues that were a bit more googleable.
The double ace was a pretty small list after ace in a day and then just some reading.
Quite remarkable accomplishment I must admit! I always view combat records with a bit of raised eyebrow with out some substantial evidence to the fact.
Combat from these remote wars is always hard to come by.
The other thing I learned there is Pakistan have a jet ace in a day the only one in history.
Lurkers have 24 hours to post something then Ill do something.
Sparky
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Old 05-16-2018, 10:37 AM
  #15833  
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All;

I appreciate the various postings. Thanks! Here is the info I tried to post earlier, and the clues I used or would have used. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird pilot do I describe?

1. This pilot is, today, almost unknown. Yet he was, in many ways, one of the best there ever was.

2. He was born on a farm.

3. And entered military service at a young age.

4. And originally served, as seems natural, in a cavalry unit.

5. He first saw combat as part of a cavalry unit.

6. He switched his path and became a pilot a couple of years later.

7. He rose through the ranks quickly.

8. By the time he first engaged in air combat, he was already an experienced pilot.

9. He accomplished things in combat that have only been done by a very small handful of men.

10. And he did at least one thing no other pilot, before or since, has accomplished.

11. He did not become an ace on his first combat flight.

12. That had to wait for his second combat flight.

13. Against enemy aircraft considered to be pretty stiff competition.

14. Of course, both flights occurred on the same day.

15. He was the top scoring ace of his service.

16. And was compared to Baron von Richthofen himself.

17. He scored over 50 victories.

18. In a total combat career of three months.

19. It may be that he became too confident of his own abilities.

20. He was shot down and killed.

21. By enemy fighters.

22. After scoring three final victories.

23. While escorting a flight of bombers.

24. He was the highest scoring ace in his conflict.

25. And the highest scoring ace of his particular service.

26. He is one of the very few men who became an “ace in a day”, scoring five or more victories in a single day.

27. He is (I believe) the only pilot to become an ace on his first day in combat. I’m not entirely sure of that claim, though.

28. He is the only pilot to score a total of ten victories on his first day in combat.

29. Nine of those victories were fighters.

30. The other was a recon bird.

31. He is one of only a single handful of aces to score more than ten victories in a single day.

32. He scored eleven victories in one day, exactly one month after his first combat sortie.

33. And exactly two months later, he died.

Answer: Warrant Officer Hiromichi Shinohara Hiromichi Shinohara (篠原弘道Shinohara Hiromichi; 1913 – 1939) was the highest-scoring fighter ace of the Imperial Japanese Army Air Service (IJAAF). On 27 June 1939 he set a Japanese record by downing 11 planes on a single day. He was shot down and killed on 27 August 1939, having claimed 58 victories in only three months of combat. He scored all his aerial victories while flying a Nakajima Ki-27.
Early life

Hiromichi Shinohara was born in August 1913 on a farm in Suzumenomiya, near Utsunomiya in the Tochigi Prefecture. After finishing his formal education he went into military service, joining the 27th Cavalry Regiment in 1931. In that capacity he took part in the Japanese invasion of Manchuria and was involved in the Jiangqiao Campaign in April 1932.
Imperial Japanese Army Air Force career

In June 1933 he went to the Tokorozawa Flying School (Tokorozawa Rikugun Koku Seibi Gakkō), graduating in January 1934 and he became enlisted as a corporal in the 1st Chutai of the 11th Hiko Datai, posted in Harbin, Manchukuo (Manchuria). By the end of 1938 he had climbed through the ranks, becoming a warrant officer. He was 25 years old and had six years of flying experience by the time the Nomonhan Incident (Battles of Khalkhin Gol) began in May 1939.

During his first combat sortie, on 27 May 1939, Shinohara, flying a Nakajima Ki-27, downed four Soviet Polikarpov I-16 fighters. He became an ace within 24 hours, after he claimed six more victories, downing a Polikarpov R-Z reconnaissance plane and five Polikarpov I-15 biplane fighters. No other pilot in history scored 10 victories during his first day of combat. From then on his victories continued, culminating on 27 June 1939 in an Imperial Japanese Army Air Force record of eleven victories in a single day during an air battle over Tamsak-Bulak. Only top ace of all time Erich Hartmann (12), Emil Lang (18), Hans-Joachim Marseille (17), Erich Rudorffer (13 in 17 minutes), have surpassed him.

Shinohara's luck however ran out on him two months later when on 27 August 1939 he himself was shot down by Soviet Polikarpov I-16 fighters after claiming three victories during a bombing escort mission. His aircraft fell in flames into Mohorehi Lake, ten kilometres south of Abdara Lake. Warrant Officer Hiromichi Shinohara was posthumously promoted to the rank of second lieutenant, having claimed 58 victories in only three months of combat—the last three in the battle that would take him down—earning him the nickname of the Richthofen of the Orient.
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Old 05-18-2018, 01:13 AM
  #15834  
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Does this mean NO ONE has a quiz ready to go? Okay then, I'll throw an easy one out to get things going again
Looking for a pilot in this case
1) This aviation pioneer was self taught
2) He made history less than a year after learning to fly
3) He was killed in a crash less than a year later
4) He was posthumously awarded a flying medal for the feats he previously performed
Good Luck

Last edited by Hydro Junkie; 05-18-2018 at 01:24 AM.
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Old 05-18-2018, 05:15 AM
  #15835  
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Lincoln Beachy
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Old 05-18-2018, 06:37 AM
  #15836  
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Not Lincoln Beachy, he learned to fly at a school run by Glenn Curtis and lived several years after learning to fly. This doesn't fit clue 1 or the timeline given in clues 2 and 3.
That said, time for another clue:
Looking for a pilot in this case
1) This aviation pioneer was self taught
2) He made history less than a year after learning to fly
3) He was killed in a crash less than a year later
4) He was posthumously awarded a flying medal for the feats he previously performed
5) In his first "history making" flight, he actually damaged his plane
6) His flight lasted only 2.5 miles
Good Luck
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Old 05-19-2018, 12:22 AM
  #15837  
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No other guesses? Time for another clue:
Looking for a pilot in this case
1) This aviation pioneer was self taught
2) He made history less than a year after learning to fly
3) He was killed in a crash less than a year later
4) He was posthumously awarded a flying medal for the feats he previously performed
5) In his first "history making" flight, he actually damaged his plane
6) His flight lasted only 2.5 miles
7) He fatally crashed in the southeastern part of his home country
8) His fatal crash was only two days short of his 25th birthday
Good Luck
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Old 05-20-2018, 04:25 PM
  #15838  
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Still no guesses? I guess it's time for another clue, or two:
Looking for a pilot in this case
1) This aviation pioneer was self taught
2) He made history less than a year after learning to fly
3) He was killed in a crash less than a year later
4) He was posthumously awarded a flying medal for the feats he previously performed
5) In his first "history making" flight, he actually damaged his plane
6) His flight lasted only 2.5 miles
7) He fatally crashed in the southeastern part of his home country
8) His fatal crash was only two days short of his 25th birthday
9) During his "history making" flights, he and his plane both were equipped with flotation since part of the flights were over water
10) Between two of his flights, he had a meal with a high ranking military officer
Good Luck
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Old 05-21-2018, 01:38 PM
  #15839  
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WOW!!!!!!!!!!!!!
I thought this would be an easy one. Guess I was wrong. Anyway, time for a few more clues:
Looking for a pilot in this case
1) This aviation pioneer was self taught
2) He made history less than a year after learning to fly
3) He was killed in a crash less than a year later
4) He was posthumously awarded a flying medal for the feats he previously performed
5) In his first "history making" flight, he actually damaged his plane
6) His flight lasted only 2.5 miles
7) He fatally crashed in the southeastern part of his home country
8) His fatal crash was only two days short of his 25th birthday
9) During his "history making" flights, he and his plane both were equipped with flotation since part of the flights were over water
10) Between two of his flights, he had a meal with a high ranking military officer
11) This person NEVER flew a combat mission
12) This person NEVER served in the military
13) This person flew a plane that was built by another aviation pioneer's company during his "history making" flights
Good Luck

Last edited by Hydro Junkie; 05-21-2018 at 01:42 PM.
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Old 05-21-2018, 08:05 PM
  #15840  
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Alrighty then, guess it's time for another clue, or two:
Looking for a pilot in this case
1) This aviation pioneer was self taught
2) He made history less than a year after learning to fly
3) He was killed in a crash less than a year later
4) He was posthumously awarded a flying medal for the feats he previously performed
5) In his first "history making" flight, he actually damaged his plane
6) His flight lasted only 2.5 miles
7) He fatally crashed in the southeastern part of his home country
8) His fatal crash was only two days short of his 25th birthday
9) During his "history making" flights, he and his plane both were equipped with flotation since part of the flights were over water
10) Between two of his flights, he had a meal with a high ranking military officer
11) This person NEVER flew a combat mission
12) This person NEVER served in the military
13) This person flew a plane that was built by another aviation pioneer's company during his "history making" flights
14) This person's flights indirectly led to an innovation in another country during a major conflict a few years later
15) The innovation referred to in clue 14 is still having a major affect on world politics and the military strategy of countries that use it, 100 years later
Good Luck

Last edited by Hydro Junkie; 05-21-2018 at 09:41 PM.
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Old 05-22-2018, 05:26 AM
  #15841  
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Archibald Hoxsey?
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Old 05-22-2018, 01:43 PM
  #15842  
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Nope, not Archibald Hoxsey.
He learned to fly from the Wright Brothers and died at 26, neither conform with clues 1 and 8 of self taught and not quite 25
Guess that means it's time for more clues:
Looking for a pilot in this case
1) This aviation pioneer was self taught
2) He made history less than a year after learning to fly
3) He was killed in a crash less than a year later
4) He was posthumously awarded a flying medal for the feats he previously performed
5) In his first "history making" flight, he actually damaged his plane
6) His flight lasted only 2.5 miles
7) He fatally crashed in the southeastern part of his home country
8) His fatal crash was only two days short of his 25th birthday
9) During his "history making" flights, he and his plane both were equipped with flotation since part of the flights were over water
10) Between two of his flights, he had a meal with a high ranking military officer
11) This person NEVER flew a combat mission
12) This person NEVER served in the military
13) This person flew a plane that was built by another aviation pioneer's company during his "history making" flights
14) This person's flights indirectly led to an innovation in another country during a major conflict a few years later
15) The innovation referred to in clue 14 is still having a major affect on world politics and the military strategy of countries that use it, 100 years later
16) This person had no contact, that I know of anyway, with the Wright Brothers or their planes
17) He was awarded his flying award, a DFC, 21 years after his fatal crash
Good Luck
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Old 05-22-2018, 08:42 PM
  #15843  
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I guess I'll have to get more specific on the next clue since I'm running out of clues.
Looking for a pilot in this case
1) This aviation pioneer was self taught
2) He made history less than a year after learning to fly
3) He was killed in a crash less than a year later
4) He was posthumously awarded a flying medal for the feats he previously performed
5) In his first "history making" flight, he actually damaged his plane
6) His flight lasted only 2.5 miles
7) He fatally crashed in the southeastern part of his home country
8) His fatal crash was only two days short of his 25th birthday
9) During his "history making" flights, he and his plane both were equipped with flotation since part of the flights were over water
10) Between two of his flights, he had a meal with a high ranking military officer
11) This person NEVER flew a combat mission
12) This person NEVER served in the military
13) This person flew a plane that was built by another aviation pioneer's company during his "history making" flights
14) This person's flights indirectly led to an innovation in another country during a major conflict a few years later
15) The innovation referred to in clue 14 is still having a major affect on world politics and the military strategy of countries that use it, 100 years later
16) This person had no contact, that I know of anyway, with the Wright Brothers or their planes
17) He was awarded his flying award, a DFC, 21 years after his fatal crash
18) The "history making" flights involved a city and an unrelated state
19) The runways for these flights had to be specially made just for the flights to be possible
Good Luck
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Old 05-23-2018, 01:19 PM
  #15844  
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Sorry, Hydro Junkie; but things have been stupid busy for the last couple of weeks. I think you're talking about Eugene Burton Ely, the first man to take off from, and later to land on, a ship. Ely didn't invent the tail hook, although he was the first to use it; nor did he come up with the idea of the platform from which he took off; but he was the first to accomplish the feats. Thanks; Ernie P.

Answer: Eugene Burton Ely

Eugene Burton Ely (October 21, 1886 – October 19, 1911) was an aviation pioneer, credited with the first shipboard aircraft take off and landing.

Ely was born in Williamsburg, Iowa and raised in Davenport, Iowa. Having completed the eighth grade, he graduated from Davenport Grammar School 4 in January 1901. Although some sources indicate that he attended and graduated from Iowa State University in 1904 (when he would have been 17), the registrar of ISU reports that there is no record of him having done so (nor did he attend the University of Iowa or the University of Northern Iowa). Ely likewise does not appear in the graduations lists for Davenport High School.

By 1904 he was employed as a chauffeur to the Rev. Fr. Smyth, a Catholic priest in
Cosgrove, Iowa, who shared Ely's love of fast driving; in Father Smyth's car (a red Franklin), Ely set the speed record between Iowa City and Davenport.


Ely was living in San Francisco at the time of the earthquake and fire and was active there in the early days of the sales and racing of automobiles. He married Mabel Hall on August 7, 1907; he was 21 and she was 17, which meant the marriage required her mother's consent; they honeymooned in Colorado.

The Elys relocated to
Nevada City, California in 1909, and for a time he drove an "auto stage" delivery route.
The couple moved to Portland, Oregon in early 1910, where he got a job as an auto salesman, working for E. Henry Wemme. Soon after, Wemme purchased one of Glenn Curtiss' first four-cylinder biplanes and acquired the franchise for the Pacific Northwest. Wemme was unable to fly the Curtiss biplane, but Ely, believing that flying was as easy as driving a car, offered to fly it. He ended up crashing it instead, and feeling responsible, bought the wreck from Wemme.

Within a few months he had repaired the aircraft and learned to fly. He flew it in the Portland area, then headed to
Minneapolis, Minnesota in June 1910 to participate in an exhibition, where he met Curtiss and started working for him.

After an unsuccessful attempt in
Sioux City, Iowa, Ely's first reported exhibition on behalf of Curtiss was in Winnipeg in July 1910. Ely received Aero Club of America pilot's license #17 on October 5, 1910.


In October, Ely and Curtiss met Captain Washington Chambers, USN, who had been appointed by George von Lengerke Meyer, the Secretary of the Navy, to investigate military uses for aviation within the Navy. This led to two experiments. On November 14, 1910, Ely took off in a Curtiss pusher from a temporary platform erected over the bow of the light cruiserUSS Birmingham. The airplane plunged downward as soon as it cleared the 83-foot platform runway; and the aircraft wheels dipped into the water before rising. Ely's goggles were covered with spray, and the aviator promptly landed on a beach rather than circling the harbor and landing at the Norfolk Navy Yard as planned. John Barry Ryan offered $500 to build the platform, and a $500 prize, for a ship to shore flight.

Two months later, on January 18, 1911, Ely landed his Curtiss pusher airplane on a platform on the armored cruiserUSS Pennsylvania anchored in San Francisco Bay. Ely flew from the Tanforan Racetrack in San Bruno, California and landed on the Pennsylvania, which was the first successful shipboard landing of an aircraft. This flight was also the first ever using a tailhook system, designed and built by circus performer and aviator Hugh Robinson. Ely told a reporter: "It was easy enough. I think the trick could be successfully turned nine times out of ten."

Ely communicated with the United States Navy requesting employment, but United States naval aviation was not yet organized. Ely continued flying in exhibitions while Captain Chambers promised to "keep him in mind" if Navy flying stations were created. Captain Chambers advised Ely to cut out the sensational features for his safety and the sake of aviation. When asked about retiring, The Des Moines Register quoted Ely as replying: "I guess I will be like the rest of them, keep at it until I am killed."

On October 19, 1911, while flying at an exhibition in Macon, Georgia, his plane was late pulling out of a dive and crashed. Ely jumped clear of the wrecked aircraft, but his neck was broken, and he died a few minutes later. Spectators picked the wreckage clean looking for souvenirs, including Ely's gloves, tie, and cap. On what would have been his twenty-fifth birthday, his body was returned to his birthplace for burial.

On February 16, 1933, Congress awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross posthumously to Ely, "for extraordinary achievement as a pioneer civilian aviator and for his significant contribution to the development of aviation in the United States Navy." An exhibit of retired naval aircraft at Naval Air Station Norfolk in Virginia bears Ely's name, and a granite historical marker in Newport News, Virginia, overlooks the waters where Ely made his historic flight in 1911 and recalls his contribution to military aviation, naval in particular.

Last edited by Ernie P.; 05-23-2018 at 01:22 PM.
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Old 05-23-2018, 05:58 PM
  #15845  
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Originally Posted by Ernie P. View Post
Sorry, Hydro Junkie; but things have been stupid busy for the last couple of weeks. I think you're talking about Eugene Burton Ely, the first man to take off from, and later to land on, a ship. Ely didn't invent the tail hook, although he was the first to use it; nor did he come up with the idea of the platform from which he took off; but he was the first to accomplish the feats. Thanks; Ernie P.

Answer: Eugene Burton Ely
And I would agree, he didn't invent any of the things needed to make his historic flights. What he did do was prove that taking off and landing on a ship was possible. In doing so, he also inadvertently changed the future of naval strategy and tactics.
Now, it's time for the clues:
1) This aviation pioneer was self taught
2) He made history less than a year after learning to fly He safely took off from a ship and, a few months later, landed on and took off from a ship
3) He was killed in a crash less than a year later He was killed doing and exhibition flight
4) He was posthumously awarded a flying medal for the feats he previously performed
5) In his first "history making" flight, he actually damaged his plane He bounced off the water and damaged his prop
6) His flight lasted only 2.5 miles Due to the damaged prop, he landed on the first land he found, Willoughby Spit
7) He fatally crashed in the southeastern part of his home country He died in Macon Georgia
8) His fatal crash was only two days short of his 25th birthday He crashed on October 19, 1912. His birthday was October 21st
9) During his "history making" flights, he and his plane both were equipped with flotation since part of the flights were over water He had flotation under the wings and bicycle inner tubes around his body
10) Between two of his flights, he had a meal with a high ranking military officer He had lunch with a Navy captain while his plane was being spotted for launch
11) This person NEVER flew a combat mission
12) This person NEVER served in the military
13) This person flew a plane that was built by another aviation pioneer's company during his "history making" flights He flew a Curtis Pusher during his flights, according to the Smithsonian Institude
14) This person's flights indirectly led to an innovation in another country during a major conflict a few years later His flights led to shipboard aircraft flying off of platforms on their gun turrets and, eventually, the conversion of the battlecruisers Furious and Courageous to handle aircraft as well as the conversion of a cruise liner into the flat decked carrier Argus
15) The innovation referred to in clue 14 is still having a major affect on world politics and the military strategy of countries that use it, 100 years later The invention of the aircraft carrier shaped naval strategy during WWII and, even today, is used to project power far from land bases of those countries that have them
16) This person had no contact, that I know of anyway, with the Wright Brothers or their planes
17) He was awarded his flying award, a DFC, 21 years after his fatal crash He was awarded his DFC in 1933
18) The "history making" flights involved a city and an unrelated state The ships he flew from, and to, were the USS Birmingham and USS Pennsylvania
19) The runways for these flights had to be specially made just for the flights to be possible The Birmingham was fitted with a 80 foot platform, allowing 57 feet of take off roll. The Pennsylvania was fitted with a 120 foot platform, allowing 97 feet to land and take off

Okay Ernie, you're up again

Last edited by Hydro Junkie; 05-23-2018 at 06:01 PM.
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Old 05-23-2018, 06:53 PM
  #15846  
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MY post above ment to be ELY but I got them switched and put down Beachy. I keep reading the clues thing of the first Carrier landings but thought I had already guessed the father of Tailhook aviation.
Sparky with 949 carrier landings
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Old 05-23-2018, 07:11 PM
  #15847  
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Actually, Ely was just a "stepchild".
The father of naval aviation was actually Captain Washington I Chambers. He was the person that set up everything needed to launch a plane from the Birmingham as well as land and launch from the Pennsylvania. Here is an excerpt from the Smithsonian Institude:
In the fall of 1910, the Navy identified Captain Washington I. Chambers “to observe everything that will be of use in the study of aviation and its influence upon the problems of naval warfare.” Chambers quickly realized the most important first step to prove that the airplane could operate at sea was to show that landings and take-offs from ships were possible. Chambers attended one of the first major flying meetings, being held at Belmont Park, NY, in October 1910. He met Glenn Curtiss and Eugene Ely at the competition and made a proposition. If he would supply the ship, would they make the attempt to land on board? Ely was excited at the prospect and agreed.
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Old 05-23-2018, 07:34 PM
  #15848  
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Thanks, Hydro Junkie; I'll get something up soon. And thanks for explaining the below clue. That had me a bit puzzled. Thanks; Ernie P.

18) The "history making" flights involved a city and an unrelated state The ships he flew from, and to, were the USS Birmingham and USS Pennsylvania
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Old 05-24-2018, 04:50 AM
  #15849  
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Okay; back to the planes for a bit. Thanks; Ernie P.



What warbird do I describe?



1. This aircraft never reached production.



2. But, it wasn’t because there was anything wrong with the aircraft itself.
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Old 05-24-2018, 05:02 AM
  #15850  
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The P-43 Lancer
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