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Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

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Old 09-12-2018, 08:09 AM
  #16326  
Top_Gunn
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A further thought:
I'm thinking this almost had to be a pilot flying over China, Europe or Africa as a pilot shot down over the Pacific was usually stuck on an island with no place to run, that is unless they found a friendly coast watcher to hide them
Yes, but ....
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Old 09-12-2018, 08:11 AM
  #16327  
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I don't think Galland ever really flew one in combat. Richard Bong and Thomas McGuire would probably have said differently since they had 40 and 38 kills respectively. Even today, their kill totals still lead all US fighter pilots though, truth be told, that doesn't tell the whole story. All of their kills were over the Pacific and many came after the elite Japanese prewar pilots were pretty much gone, most being killed over the Solomon Islands by Navy and Marine pilots flying Wildcats and later, Corsairs.
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Old 09-13-2018, 04:35 AM
  #16328  
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Today's clue.

Looking for the name of a pilot.

1. An ace.

2. Not a spectacularly high-scoring ace, but he is one of a small number of pilots to have achieved a particular kind of success during the one war he fought in.

3. He is remembered today not for his score, not primarily for the kind of success mentioned in clue no. 2, but mostly for what he did on one particular flight.

4. He was once shot down behind enemy lines and was captured, but he escaped. (This was not one of the things referred to in earlier clues.)

5. The feat for which he is remembered is one that some pilots have done accidentally. He did it on purpose.

6. One of the planes he flew is now in a museum.

7. If you've seen that plane, or even a picture of it, you almost certainly remember it.

8. The feat for which he is most remembered was the shooting down of one particular airplane.

9. The plane he shot down had two engines.

10. And it was unarmed.

11. Going back to clue 2: He was one of only three pilots from his country to have shot down a particular combination of enemy planes. Those victories were quite unlike the one to which clues 3, 5, 8, 9, and 10 refer.

12. None of the 12 or 13 people (accounts vary) on board the plane he shot down on his most memorable flight were killed, and none of the accounts I've read says that any were injured. Several sources say that he was decorated for shooting that plane down, but this is almost certainly not true.

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Old 09-14-2018, 04:23 AM
  #16329  
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Today's clue.

Looking for the name of a pilot.

1. An ace.

2. Not a spectacularly high-scoring ace, but he is one of a small number of pilots to have achieved a particular kind of success during the one war he fought in.

3. He is remembered today not for his score, not primarily for the kind of success mentioned in clue no. 2, but mostly for what he did on one particular flight.

4. He was once shot down behind enemy lines and was captured, but he escaped. (This was not one of the things referred to in earlier clues.)

5. The feat for which he is remembered is one that some pilots have done accidentally. He did it on purpose.

6. One of the planes he flew is now in a museum.

7. If you've seen that plane, or even a picture of it, you almost certainly remember it.

8. The feat for which he is most remembered was the shooting down of one particular airplane.

9. The plane he shot down had two engines.

10. And it was unarmed.

11. Going back to clue 2: He was one of only three pilots from his country to have shot down a particular combination of enemy planes. Those victories were quite unlike the one to which clues 3, 5, 8, 9, and 10 refer.

12. None of the 12 or 13 people (accounts vary) on board the plane he shot down on his most memorable flight were killed, and none of the accounts I've read says that any were injured. Several sources say that he was decorated for shooting that plane down, but this is almost certainly not true.

13. He flew P-38s early in the war and later flew P-51s. His most-memorable flight was in a P-51D, which is now in a museum.
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Old 09-14-2018, 07:06 AM
  #16330  
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Originally Posted by Hydro Junkie View Post
I don't think Galland ever really flew one in combat. Richard Bong and Thomas McGuire would probably have said differently since they had 40 and 38 kills respectively. Even today, their kill totals still lead all US fighter pilots though, truth be told, that doesn't tell the whole story. All of their kills were over the Pacific and many came after the elite Japanese prewar pilots were pretty much gone, most being killed over the Solomon Islands by Navy and Marine pilots flying Wildcats and later, Corsairs.
Hydro Junkie; there is even more to the story. By the time the P-38's were in combat, the U.S. pilots had learned to adapt their tactics to exploit the strengths of their aircraft, speed, firepower and armor, and minimize the strengths, mainly low speed maneuverability, of the Japanese fighters. The Zero could maneuver very well; but above 200 MPH, and especially above 250, not so much. The new tactics of the American pilots were pretty simple: Keep your speed up; don't get into a turning fight; dive down and if you miss, simply repeat the maneuver. IOW, boom and zoom. Maneuvering is essentially a defensive tactic. Don't play the game. Dive, shoot, zoom and repeat as necessary. Once the Americans learned that, the game was pretty much over. Thanks; Ernie P.
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Old 09-14-2018, 01:02 PM
  #16331  
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Originally Posted by Ernie P. View Post
Hydro Junkie; there is even more to the story. By the time the P-38's were in combat, the U.S. pilots had learned to adapt their tactics to exploit the strengths of their aircraft, speed, firepower and armor, and minimize the strengths, mainly low speed maneuverability, of the Japanese fighters. The Zero could maneuver very well; but above 200 MPH, and especially above 250, not so much. The new tactics of the American pilots were pretty simple: Keep your speed up; don't get into a turning fight; dive down and if you miss, simply repeat the maneuver. IOW, boom and zoom. Maneuvering is essentially a defensive tactic. Don't play the game. Dive, shoot, zoom and repeat as necessary. Once the Americans learned that, the game was pretty much over. Thanks; Ernie P.
And while all of that is true, you have to remember that there wasn't a significant amount of P-38s, or Corsairs for that matter, around until mid to late 1943. On April 18, 1943, there were only 18 total on Guadalcanal and all were slated to go in Operation Vengeance. Regardless, as I said in my last post, a majority of the elite Japanese pilots were gone, using the same tactics you just described. It wasn't until an intact A6M (other than the vertical stab, which was replaced using one from another captured wreck) was found in Alaska, after the Battle of Midway, and tested that the American pilots really knew how to defeat them. Claire Chenault previously had taught the same tactics to the AVG(otherwise known as the "Flying Tigers") which brought them much success. It must also be remembered that the A6M was optimized to fight below 15,000 feet. This fell right into the Allison's performance envelope considering that the Allison was also very good below 15,000 feet. I do have to agree, the A6M's controls got heavier as the speed increased, limiting the plane's ability and taxing the pilot's endurance.
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Old 09-15-2018, 04:17 AM
  #16332  
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Originally Posted by Hydro Junkie View Post
I don't think Galland ever really flew one in combat. Richard Bong and Thomas McGuire would probably have said differently since they had 40 and 38 kills respectively. Even today, their kill totals still lead all US fighter pilots though, truth be told, that doesn't tell the whole story. All of their kills were over the Pacific and many came after the elite Japanese prewar pilots were pretty much gone, most being killed over the Solomon Islands by Navy and Marine pilots flying Wildcats and later, Corsairs.
Well, of course he didn't fly them in combat; he was a German. The P-38 did badly against German fighters, and in the end was used only for recon in Europe. Eric Brown, whose name came up earlier in this thread, said the Americans found this surprising , because Bong was doing so well in the Pacific. Kurt Bühlingen, who shot down 13 of them, said they were easy pickings.

Now, back to the quiz.
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Old 09-15-2018, 04:19 AM
  #16333  
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Today's clue.

Looking for the name of a pilot.

1. An ace.

2. Not a spectacularly high-scoring ace, but he is one of a small number of pilots to have achieved a particular kind of success during the one war he fought in.

3. He is remembered today not for his score, not primarily for the kind of success mentioned in clue no. 2, but mostly for what he did on one particular flight.

4. He was once shot down behind enemy lines and was captured, but he escaped. (This was not one of the things referred to in earlier clues.)

5. The feat for which he is remembered is one that some pilots have done accidentally. He did it on purpose.

6. One of the planes he flew is now in a museum.

7. If you've seen that plane, or even a picture of it, you almost certainly remember it.

8. The feat for which he is most remembered was the shooting down of one particular airplane.

9. The plane he shot down had two engines.

10. And it was unarmed.

11. Going back to clue 2: He was one of only three pilots from his country to have shot down a particular combination of enemy planes. Those victories were quite unlike the one to which clues 3, 5, 8, 9, and 10 refer.

12. None of the 12 or 13 people (accounts vary) on board the plane he shot down on his most memorable flight were killed, and none of the accounts I've read says that any were injured. Several sources say that he was decorated for shooting that plane down, but this is almost certainly not true.

13. He flew P-38s early in the war and later flew P-51s. His most-memorable flight was in a P-51D, which is now in a museum.

14. Almost all (and maybe all) of the pictures of his P-51 show the kill markings clearly.
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Old 09-16-2018, 05:03 AM
  #16334  
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Today's clue.

Looking for the name of a pilot.

1. An ace.

2. Not a spectacularly high-scoring ace, but he is one of a small number of pilots to have achieved a particular kind of success during the one war he fought in.

3. He is remembered today not for his score, not primarily for the kind of success mentioned in clue no. 2, but mostly for what he did on one particular flight.

4. He was once shot down behind enemy lines and was captured, but he escaped. (This was not one of the things referred to in earlier clues.)

5. The feat for which he is remembered is one that some pilots have done accidentally. He did it on purpose.

6. One of the planes he flew is now in a museum.

7. If you've seen that plane, or even a picture of it, you almost certainly remember it.

8. The feat for which he is most remembered was the shooting down of one particular airplane.

9. The plane he shot down had two engines.

10. And it was unarmed.

11. Going back to clue 2: He was one of only three pilots from his country to have shot down a particular combination of enemy planes. Those victories were quite unlike the one to which clues 3, 5, 8, 9, and 10 refer.

12. None of the 12 or 13 people (accounts vary) on board the plane he shot down on his most memorable flight were killed, and none of the accounts I've read says that any were injured. Several sources say that he was decorated for shooting that plane down, but this is almost certainly not true.

13. He flew P-38s early in the war and later flew P-51s. His most-memorable flight was in a P-51D, which is now in a museum.

14. Almost all (and maybe all) of the pictures of his P-51 show the kill markings clearly.

15. No other airplane has ever had kill markings representing all of the countries his had.
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Old 09-16-2018, 10:04 AM
  #16335  
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I have no clue but I'm pretty sure I saw a picture of a P-51 with both German and Jap kills on it.
Sparky
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Old 09-16-2018, 10:45 AM
  #16336  
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That's close enough for a bonus clue, Sparky. He had those, though he was not the only pilot who did. But he had more. And I'm sort of hoping that a Hoosier gets this one, for reasons that may become clear, eventually. Could be someone from Arizona, though.

Looking for the name of a pilot.

1. An ace.

2. Not a spectacularly high-scoring ace, but he is one of a small number of pilots to have achieved a particular kind of success during the one war he fought in.

3. He is remembered today not for his score, not primarily for the kind of success mentioned in clue no. 2, but mostly for what he did on one particular flight.

4. He was once shot down behind enemy lines and was captured, but he escaped. (This was not one of the things referred to in earlier clues.)

5. The feat for which he is remembered is one that some pilots have done accidentally. He did it on purpose.

6. One of the planes he flew is now in a museum.

7. If you've seen that plane, or even a picture of it, you almost certainly remember it.

8. The feat for which he is most remembered was the shooting down of one particular airplane.

9. The plane he shot down had two engines.

10. And it was unarmed.

11. Going back to clue 2: He was one of only three pilots from his country to have shot down a particular combination of enemy planes. Those victories were quite unlike the one to which clues 3, 5, 8, 9, and 10 refer.

12. None of the 12 or 13 people (accounts vary) on board the plane he shot down on his most memorable flight were killed, and none of the accounts I've read says that any were injured. Several sources say that he was decorated for shooting that plane down, but this is almost certainly not true.

13. He flew P-38s early in the war and later flew P-51s. His most-memorable flight was in a P-51D, which is now in a museum.

14. Almost all (and maybe all) of the pictures of his P-51 show the kill markings clearly.

15. No other airplane has ever had kill markings representing all of the countries his had.

16. He fought in North Africa, Europe, and the Pacific.
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Old 09-17-2018, 04:20 AM
  #16337  
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Today's clue.

Looking for the name of a pilot.

1. An ace.

2. Not a spectacularly high-scoring ace, but he is one of a small number of pilots to have achieved a particular kind of success during the one war he fought in.

3. He is remembered today not for his score, not primarily for the kind of success mentioned in clue no. 2, but mostly for what he did on one particular flight.

4. He was once shot down behind enemy lines and was captured, but he escaped. (This was not one of the things referred to in earlier clues.)

5. The feat for which he is remembered is one that some pilots have done accidentally. He did it on purpose.

6. One of the planes he flew is now in a museum.

7. If you've seen that plane, or even a picture of it, you almost certainly remember it.

8. The feat for which he is most remembered was the shooting down of one particular airplane.

9. The plane he shot down had two engines.

10. And it was unarmed.

11. Going back to clue 2: He was one of only three pilots from his country to have shot down a particular combination of enemy planes. Those victories were quite unlike the one to which clues 3, 5, 8, 9, and 10 refer.

12. None of the 12 or 13 people (accounts vary) on board the plane he shot down on his most memorable flight were killed, and none of the accounts I've read says that any were injured. Several sources say that he was decorated for shooting that plane down, but this is almost certainly not true.

13. He flew P-38s early in the war and later flew P-51s. His most-memorable flight was in a P-51D, which is now in a museum.

14. Almost all (and maybe all) of the pictures of his P-51 show the kill markings clearly.

15. No other airplane has ever had kill markings representing all of the countries his had.

16. He fought in North Africa, Europe, and the Pacific.

17. The unarmed plane he shot down ditched in the Pacific ocean. The passengers and crew, as well as an American fighter pilot who had ditched nearby, were picked up by a PBY the next day. He went along on the rescue mission to help find them.
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Old 09-18-2018, 03:52 AM
  #16338  
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Today's clue.

Looking for the name of a pilot.

1. An ace.

2. Not a spectacularly high-scoring ace, but he is one of a small number of pilots to have achieved a particular kind of success during the one war he fought in.

3. He is remembered today not for his score, not primarily for the kind of success mentioned in clue no. 2, but mostly for what he did on one particular flight.

4. He was once shot down behind enemy lines and was captured, but he escaped. (This was not one of the things referred to in earlier clues.)

5. The feat for which he is remembered is one that some pilots have done accidentally. He did it on purpose.

6. One of the planes he flew is now in a museum.

7. If you've seen that plane, or even a picture of it, you almost certainly remember it.

8. The feat for which he is most remembered was the shooting down of one particular airplane.

9. The plane he shot down had two engines.

10. And it was unarmed.

11. Going back to clue 2: He was one of only three pilots from his country to have shot down a particular combination of enemy planes. Those victories were quite unlike the one to which clues 3, 5, 8, 9, and 10 refer.

12. None of the 12 or 13 people (accounts vary) on board the plane he shot down on his most memorable flight were killed, and none of the accounts I've read says that any were injured. Several sources say that he was decorated for shooting that plane down, but this is almost certainly not true.

13. He flew P-38s early in the war and later flew P-51s. His most-memorable flight was in a P-51D, which is now in a museum.

14. Almost all (and maybe all) of the pictures of his P-51 show the kill markings clearly.

15. No other airplane has ever had kill markings representing all of the countries his had.

16. He fought in North Africa, Europe, and the Pacific.

17. The unarmed plane he shot down ditched in the Pacific ocean. The passengers and crew, as well as an American fighter pilot who had ditched nearby, were picked up by a PBY the next day. He went along on the rescue mission to help find them.

18. He later married one of the women (a nurse) who had been on the plane when he shot it down, according to most reports.
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Old 09-18-2018, 04:48 AM
  #16339  
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The Bad Angel, Louis E. Curdes?
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Old 09-18-2018, 07:42 AM
  #16340  
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Curdes it is! One of only three Americans to have shot down a plane belonging to each of the three major enemy powers: Germany, Italy, and Japan. And, in addition, he shot up the engines of an American C-47 with a bad radio to keep it from landing on an airstrip on an island still held by the Japanese. This earned him an American flag kill marking. Curdes was from Indiana; his P-51, "Bad Angel," is now in the Pima Air Museum in Arizona. Here's the Wikipedia page, complete with a picture of him and his plane. Well done, FlyerInOKC, and you're up.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_Edward_Curdes
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Old 09-18-2018, 08:10 AM
  #16341  
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Originally Posted by Top_Gunn View Post
Curdes it is! One of only three Americans to have shot down a plane belonging to each of the three major enemy powers: Germany, Italy, and Japan. And, in addition, he shot up the engines of an American C-47 with a bad radio to keep it from landing on an airstrip on an island still held by the Japanese. This earned him an American flag kill marking. Curdes was from Indiana; his P-51, "Bad Angel," is now in the Pima Air Museum in Arizona. Here's the Wikipedia page, complete with a picture of him and his plane. Well done, FlyerInOKC, and you're up.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_Edward_Curdes
Someone had to have a sense of humor to add that last flag to his kill list! He was just 3 months younger than my father. I'll come up with an idea to post later today.
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Old 09-18-2018, 08:19 AM
  #16342  
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Something just came to me so here goes.

1. I'm looking for a pilot.
2. This pilot is not famous for his flying.
3. He served in multiple assignments in Fighter Operations

Last edited by FlyerInOKC; 09-18-2018 at 09:00 AM.
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Old 09-18-2018, 10:43 AM
  #16343  
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Okay guys, is this becoming a "Who's Who" thread or what? I had no clue as to the last pilot and now you want another one?
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Old 09-18-2018, 11:05 AM
  #16344  
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Can't be that hard I got the last one! But since you whined I'll fork over some more blatant clues.

1. I'm looking for a pilot.
2. This pilot is not famous for his flying.
3. He served in multiple assignments in Fighter Operations
4. His promotion prospects went nowhere for years until he changed aircraft.
5. In retirement you could say he had political aspirations but was never elected.
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Old 09-18-2018, 12:44 PM
  #16345  
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Who said anything about whining? I was just having a little fun with the fact I was totally stumped with the last flyer quiz is all.
As far as this one, how about the infamous Chuck Yeager
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Old 09-18-2018, 12:52 PM
  #16346  
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Originally Posted by Hydro Junkie View Post
Who said anything about whining? I was just having a little fun with the fact I was totally stumped with the last flyer quiz is all.
As far as this one, how about the infamous Chuck Yeager
Sorry! I was having fun by saying you were whining. Alas it is not General Yeager but a good guess. As a reward you get another clue and I will clarify No. 4.
1. I'm looking for a pilot.
2. This pilot is not famous for his flying.
3. He served in multiple assignments in Fighter Operations
4. His promotion prospects went nowhere for years until he changed the type of aircraft.
5. In retirement you could say he had political aspirations but was never elected
6. As a fighter pilot he never engaged the enemy.
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Old 09-18-2018, 01:39 PM
  #16347  
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Charles Lindbergh?
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Old 09-18-2018, 02:21 PM
  #16348  
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Stockdale?
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Old Yesterday, 04:33 AM
  #16349  
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Good morning all! Sorry its not Stockdale or Charlie Lindbergh. Here are two more clues for your efforts and a morning clue to chew on.

1. I'm looking for a pilot.
2. This pilot is not famous for his flying.
3. He served in multiple assignments in Fighter Operations
4. His promotion prospects went nowhere for years until he changed the type of aircraft.
5. In retirement you could say he had political aspirations but was never elected
6. As a fighter pilot he never engaged the enemy.
7. This pilot started his career in the Air Corps Reserve and transfered to active duty a short time later.
8. This pilot's college degree is in Engineering, he did NOT attend a military academy.
8. He was decorated by both his own government and foreign governments.
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Old Yesterday, 08:09 AM
  #16350  
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No more guesses? OK here is another clue.

1. I'm looking for a pilot.
2. This pilot is not famous for his flying.
3. He served in multiple assignments in Fighter Operations
4. His promotion prospects went nowhere for years until he changed the type of aircraft.
5. In retirement you could say he had political aspirations but was never elected
6. As a fighter pilot he never engaged the enemy.
7. This pilot started his career in the Air Corps Reserve and transfered to active duty a short time later.
8. This pilot made a major contribution to air routes.
9. This pilot's college degree is in Engineering, he did NOT attend a military academy.
10. He was decorated by both his own government and foreign governments.

Last edited by FlyerInOKC; Yesterday at 11:40 AM.
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