RC Warbirds and Warplanes Discuss rc warbirds and warplanes in this forum.

Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

Reply

Old 12-30-2018, 04:48 PM
  #16776  
Hydro Junkie
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Marysville, WA
Posts: 7,336
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Not the Dauntless, though it was a good guess. How about another clue, or two:
Looking for a plane:
1) This plane was much slower than its opponents but was still deadly
2) A notorious pilot flew one with much success
3) This plane looked very similar to its predecessor
4) This plane had a feature not seen on its opponents
Good Luck
Hydro Junkie is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2018, 05:59 PM
  #16777  
elmshoot
My Feedback: (6)
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Nashville, IN,
Posts: 1,253
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

MIG 17 they added a cannon I think oh and an afterburner
elmshoot is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2018, 08:41 PM
  #16778  
Hydro Junkie
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Marysville, WA
Posts: 7,336
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

I was hoping for simple but WOW!!!!
I guess it's your turn. BTW, I was looking at the twin cannons that the American fighters didn't carry as the Pentagon had deemed missiles were the only weapons needed due to the ranges and speeds of combat. You have to remember, all of the American fighters were supersonic and equipped with afterburners after the Korean war was halted by a cease fire.

Last edited by Hydro Junkie; 12-30-2018 at 08:46 PM.
Hydro Junkie is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2018, 06:16 AM
  #16779  
elmshoot
My Feedback: (6)
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Nashville, IN,
Posts: 1,253
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Oh Crap! All I could remember of planes that always confused me was the Mig15/17 since they looked so much alike. I have had dozens if not hundreds or airplane recognition tests in the Navy and this one always tripped me up. Fortunately they always used the same slide most of the time so you just learned the overall slide they used.
Now i will open this up the the lurkers and I prefer not using people. While interesting I enjoy the airplane line of clues more.
Sparky
elmshoot is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2019, 01:55 PM
  #16780  
elmshoot
My Feedback: (6)
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Nashville, IN,
Posts: 1,253
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Lurkers last chance to jump in! here is your chance to pick some obscure topic You have until the morning of 3 Jan and then I will post something.
Sparky
elmshoot is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2019, 07:50 AM
  #16781  
elmshoot
My Feedback: (6)
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Nashville, IN,
Posts: 1,253
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

OK NO LURKERS have posted any thing so the three or four of us will play again.

1. Observers thought this to be a fighter when it debut at an airshow.
2. Sleek even by today's standards.


Sparky
elmshoot is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2019, 06:12 PM
  #16782  
elmshoot
My Feedback: (6)
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Nashville, IN,
Posts: 1,253
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

1. Observers thought this to be a fighter when it debut at an airshow.
2. Sleek even by today's standards.
3. High transonic speed and possibly Mach 1 capable at altitude.
4. Significant numbers produced over 1000 units.
5. One crew was posthumously awarded medals when killed in a crash avoiding collateral damage on the ground.

Sparky
elmshoot is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2019, 12:05 PM
  #16783  
elmshoot
My Feedback: (6)
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Nashville, IN,
Posts: 1,253
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

1. Observers thought this to be a fighter when it debut at an airshow.
2. Sleek even by today's standards.
3. High transonic speed and possibly Mach 1 capable at altitude.
4. Significant numbers produced over 1000 units.
5. One crew was posthumously awarded medals when killed in a crash avoiding collateral damage on the ground.
6. More than one turbojet engine for power non afterburning
7. Normal complement of two in the crew.
8. From a famous designer
9. One variant was built to meet a subsequent design request and proved to actually be slower than the unmodified airplane.


Sparky
elmshoot is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2019, 01:08 PM
  #16784  
elmshoot
My Feedback: (6)
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Nashville, IN,
Posts: 1,253
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Crickets, I hear crickets!
Come on any guesses?
1. Observers thought this to be a fighter when it debut at an airshow.
2. Sleek even by today's standards.
3. High transonic speed and possibly Mach 1 capable at altitude.
4. Significant numbers produced over 1000 units.
5. One crew was posthumously awarded medals when killed in a crash avoiding collateral damage on the ground.
6. More than one turbojet engine for power non afterburning
7. Normal complement of two in the crew.
8. From a famous designer
9. One variant was built to meet a subsequent design request and proved to actually be slower than the unmodified airplane.
10, Unique landing gear arrangement shared by only a handful of airplanes, all warbirds.
11. At least 5 variants produced
12. The only forward firing ordnance was missiles.

No guess no more clues.
Sparky
elmshoot is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2019, 01:53 AM
  #16785  
Hydro Junkie
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Marysville, WA
Posts: 7,336
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

I'm thinking bicycle landing gear which says B-47 to me
Hydro Junkie is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2019, 05:07 AM
  #16786  
elmshoot
My Feedback: (6)
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Nashville, IN,
Posts: 1,253
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Nope not the B-47

1. Observers thought this to be a fighter when it debut at an airshow.
2. Sleek even by today's standards.
3. High transonic speed and possibly Mach 1 capable at altitude.
4. Significant numbers produced over 1000 units.
5. One crew was posthumously awarded medals when killed in a crash avoiding collateral damage on the ground.
6. More than one turbojet engine for power non afterburning
7. Normal complement of two in the crew.
8. From a famous designer
9. One variant was built to meet a subsequent design request and proved to actually be slower than the unmodified airplane.
10, Unique landing gear arrangement shared by only a handful of airplanes, all warbirds.
11. At least 5 variants produced
12. The only forward firing ordnance was missiles.
13. Bicycle landing gear
14. Probably not a nuclear bomber since nukes back then were quite large, I guess todaay if they were still being flown they could carry a nuke.
15. Introduced in 1960 retired in the early 1980's from primary role but was operated as a trainer until 1992 or there about.
elmshoot is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2019, 06:18 AM
  #16787  
Hydro Junkie
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Marysville, WA
Posts: 7,336
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

F-111a
Hydro Junkie is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2019, 04:37 PM
  #16788  
JohnnyS
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Toronto, ON, CANADA
Posts: 666
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Yak-28.
JohnnyS is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2019, 06:35 AM
  #16789  
elmshoot
My Feedback: (6)
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Nashville, IN,
Posts: 1,253
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Originally Posted by JohnnyS View Post
Yak-28.
Ding! Ding! We have a winner! Ding! Ding!

Yakovlev Yak-28

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Yak-28Click image for larger version

Name:	300px-YaK_28_%22Brewer_C%22.jpg
Views:	4
Size:	10.5 KB
ID:	2263177Yak-28 in flightRoleMedium bomber
Reconnaissance
Electronic warfare
InterceptorNational originSoviet UnionManufacturerYakovlevFirst flight5 March 1958Introduction1960Retired1992 (Belorussia)Primary usersSoviet Air Forces
Soviet Air Defence Forces
Russian Air Force
Ukrainian Air ForceNumber built1,180[1]The Yakovlev Yak-28 (Russian: Яковлев Як-28) is a swept wing, turbojet-powered combat aircraft used by the Soviet Union. Produced initially as a tactical bomber, it was also manufactured in reconnaissance, electronic warfare, interceptor, and trainer versions, known by the NATO reporting names Brewer, Firebar, and Maestro respectively. Based on the Yak-129 prototype first flown on 5 March 1958, it began to enter service in 1960.

Design and development

The Yak-28 was first[2] seen by the West at the Tushino air show in 1961. Western analysts initially believed it to be a fighter rather than an attack aircraft—and a continuation of the Yak-25M—and it was designated "Flashlight". After its actual role was realized, the Yak-28 bomber series was redesignated "Brewer".The Yak-28 had a large mid-mounted wing, swept at 45 degrees. The tailplane set halfway up the vertical fin (with cutouts to allow rudder movement). Slats were fitted on the leading edges and slotted flaps were mounted on the trailing edges of the wings. The two Tumansky R-11 turbojet engines, initially with 57 kN (12,795 lbf) thrust each, were mounted in pods, similar to the previous Yak-25. The wing-mounted engines and bicycle-type main landing gear (supplemented by outrigger wheels in fairings near the wingtips) were widely spaced, allowing most of the fuselage to be used for fuel and equipment. It was primarily subsonic, although Mach 1 could be exceeded at high altitude.Total production of all Yak-28s was 1,180.

Operational history

It was in a Yak-28 that Captain Boris Kapustin and Lieutenant Yuri Yanov performed a heroic act on 6 April 1966. After one of the engines on their aircraft malfunctioned they were ordered to divert to attempt a landing in Soviet zone of Germany, but lost control of the aircraft and strayed into the airspace of West Berlin. The crew managed to avoid a housing estate but crashed into Lake Stößensee without ejecting. They were posthumously awarded the medal of the Red Banner. Their bodies, along with the wreckage, were raised from the lake by Royal Naval divers from Portsmouth who also retrieved important top secret material from the plane, including the engines, which were taken to RAF Gatow to be inspected by RAF and American engineers. The first engine was recovered on April 18, 1966 and the second a week later; both engines were returned to the Soviets on May 2, 1966.[3]The Yak-28P was withdrawn in the early 1980s, but trainer and other versions remained in service until after the fall of the Soviet Union, flying until at least 1992. The reconnaissance and ECM aircraft were eventually replaced by variants of the Sukhoi Su-24.

Variants

Click image for larger version

Name:	220px-Yakolev_Yak-28L_Brewer-B_09_red_%287903015146%29.jpg
Views:	4
Size:	10.8 KB
ID:	2263178
Yak-28L tactical bomber, featuring a glazed nose.
Yak-129Prototype of Yak-28.[4]Yak-28 (Izdeliye B)
Click image for larger version

Name:	220px-Yakovlev_Yak-28_-_Irkutsk_gate_guard.jpg
Views:	5
Size:	5.0 KB
ID:	2263179
Yak-28 (unknown mod) at Irkutsk Aircraft Plant, Irkut Corporation
Tactical bomber. Initial production version; built in small numbers without radar.[4]Yak-28B (Izdeliye 28B; NATO reporting name: "Brewer-A")Production of Yak-28 with weapon-aiming radar fitted, and various improvements such as fittings for JATO bottles. Production number unknown.[5]Yak-28L (Izdeliye 28L; NATO reporting name: "Brewer-B")Tactical bomber with ground-controlled targeting system using triangulation from ground-based transmitter sites. A total of 111 built.[5]Yak-28I (Izdeliye 28I; NATO reporting name: "Brewer-C")Tactical bomber with the internal targeting system "Initsiativa-2" 360-degree ground-mapping radar. A total of 223 built.[5]Yak-28UVP prototype (ookorochennyy vzlyot i posahdkashort takeoff and landing)A single Yak-28 converted for testing short takeoff and landing techniques with JATO bottles and braking parachutes.[4]Yak-28U (Izdeliye 28U) (oochebnyy – training) (NATO reporting name – "Maestro")It was a dual control trainer with a second cockpit in the nose for student pilots; made as a prototype in 1962.[5] A total of 183 were built.[5]
Click image for larger version

Name:	220px-16-05-29-JAK-28-LHS-Finowfurt-RalfR-DSCF8178.jpg
Views:	2
Size:	8.6 KB
ID:	2263180
Yak-28R
Yak-28R (Izdeliye 28R; NATO reporting name: "Brewer-D")A dedicated tactical reconnaissance version of the Yak-28I, with increased headroom under the pilot´s canopy, increased nose glazing with a sloping rear bulkhead, Initsiativa-2 radar, and five interchangeable pallets containing various mission equipment fittings. Prototype in 1963.[5] A total of 183 built.[5]Yak-28SR prototype (samolyot raspylitel – spraying/dusting aircraft) first use of SR.[4]Chemical warfare aircraft for dispensing dust or liquid agents from underwing tank/applicators. Though recommended for production none were delivered to the VVS.Yak-28SR (Izdeliye 28SR) second use of SR.[4]Tactical reconnaissance aircraft fitted with an active radio/radar jammer (either SPS-141 or SPS-143). Production was on a very small scale.Yak-28TARK (televiszionnyy aviatsionnyy razveddyvatel'nyy kompleks)[4]Television reconnaissance system to send real-time images to a ground base. Backup provided by a 190 mm focal length still camera.Yak-28RR (Izdeliye 28RR)Radiation intelligence aircraft with RR8311-100 air sampling pods, for gathering samples of nuclear tests. The pods were specially designed for the Yak-28RR but became standard fit for all subsequent radiation intelligence gathering aircraft. Modification of a number of existing Yak-28R aircraft.[5]Yak-28RLRadiation Intelligence aircraft conceived by fitting RR8311-100 air sampling pods, with no other specialist equipment. Modification of a number of existing Yak-28L aircraft.[5]Yak-28PP (Izeliye 28PP) (NATO reporting name – "Brewer-E")Deployed in 1970, it is notable as the first[2] Soviet electronic countermeasures (ECM) aircraft. It was unarmed, with an extensive electronic warfare (EW) suite in the bomb bay[2] and various aerials and dielectric panels for transmitting the jamming signals. Excess heat generated by the jamming equipment was dissipated by heat exchangers under the centre fuselage; it did not include a radome.[2] Produced in the 1970s in unknown numbers.[5]Yak-28VV proposition (vertikahl'nyy vzlyot – vertical take-off)A vertical takeoff and landing project, with two R-27AF-300 lift/cruise engines and four R39P-300 lift engines in the forward fuselage.Yak-28LSh propositionLight attack aircraft project competing with the Ilyushin Il-102 and Sukhoi T-8, eliminated at an early stage.Yak-28P (Izdeliye 40) (NATO reporting name – "Firebar")A dedicated long-range interceptor version, the Yak-28P was developed from 1960 and deployed operationally from 1964.[5] It omitted the internal weapons bay in favor of additional fuselage tanks (its fuel capacity was considerable, limited by weight rather than volume), and added a new 'Oriol-D' interception radar compatible with the R-98 (AA-3 'Anab') air-to-air missile. Late production "upgraded" Yak-28Ps had a longer radome of pure conical shape and enhanced armament. Produced until 1967, with 435 built.[5]Yak-28PM prototypeUpgraded Yak-28P with R11AF3-300 engines, flight testing started in 1963 but development abandoned when the R11AF3-300 did not enter production.The re-engined "PM" modification has established a speed record of 2,400 km/h in 1963.Yak-28URP prototypeHigh altitude interceptor prototype using a rocket engine to boost performance during the interception phase.
Click image for larger version

Name:	220px-Jak-28-64.svg.png
Views:	2
Size:	14.2 KB
ID:	2263181
Yak-28-64, a prototype that never entered service
Yak-28-64 prototypeExtensively redesigned Yak-28P with Tumansky R-11F2-300 engines moved to the rear fuselage with intakes extending to the cockpit, intended to compete with the Sukhoi Su-15. Performance was very disappointing, being slower than the Yak-28P, and serious aileron reversal issues caused the abandonment of the Yak-28-64.

Operators

Name:  23px-Flag_of_Russia.svg.png
Views: 182
Size:  290 Bytes RussiaName:  23px-Flag_of_the_Soviet_Union.svg.png
Views: 183
Size:  353 Bytes Soviet UnionName:  23px-Flag_of_Turkmenistan.svg.png
Views: 179
Size:  679 Bytes TurkmenistanName:  23px-Flag_of_Ukraine.svg.png
Views: 174
Size:  293 Bytes Ukraine

Specifications (Yak-28P)

Click image for larger version

Name:	400px-Yakovlev_Yak-28P_three-view_silhouette.png
Views:	2
Size:	24.6 KB
ID:	2263186
General characteristics
  • Crew: two
  • Length: 21.6 m (75 ft 0 in)
  • Wingspan: 12.50 m (41 ft 0 in)
  • Height: 3.95 m (12 ft 11 in)
  • Wing area: 37.6 m² (405 ft²)
  • Empty weight: 9,970 kg [6] (21,980 lb)
  • Loaded weight: 15,000 kg (33,069 lb)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 20,000 kg (44,092 lb)
  • Powerplant: 2 × Tumansky R-11 afterburning turbojets, 46 kN dry, 62 kN with afterburning (10,140 lbf dry, 13,670 lbf with afterburning) each
PerformanceArmament

See also

Related developmentAircraft of comparable role, configuration and era

References

Notes
  1. "Jakowlew Jak-28" (in German). suchoj.com. Retrieved: 18 July 2012.
Bibliography

External links

Name:  30px-Commons-logo.svg.png
Views: 172
Size:  1.7 KBWikimedia Commons has media related to Yakovlev Yak-28.
Categories:

Navigation menu

Languages

  • Name:  wikimedia-button.png
Views: 174
Size:  2.4 KB
  • Name:  poweredby_mediawiki_88x31.png
Views: 176
Size:  1.5 KB
elmshoot is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2019, 04:39 AM
  #16790  
JohnnyS
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Toronto, ON, CANADA
Posts: 666
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

That was a very interesting aircraft. It does follow Nicklas’ Law of Aircraft Identification: “If it’s ugly, it’s British; if it’s weird, it’s French; and if it’s ugly and weird, it’s Russian.”



So, we need a new quiz. Here goes:

1. Less than 100 built.
2. It had automatic leading edge slats.
JohnnyS is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2019, 11:43 AM
  #16791  
Ernie P.
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bealeton, VA
Posts: 5,019
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Originally Posted by JohnnyS View Post
That was a very interesting aircraft. It does follow Nicklas’ Law of Aircraft Identification: “If it’s ugly, it’s British; if it’s weird, it’s French; and if it’s ugly and weird, it’s Russian.”



So, we need a new quiz. Here goes:

1. Less than 100 built.
2. It had automatic leading edge slats.
How about the Heinkel He-100? Thanks; Ernie P.
Ernie P. is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2019, 02:20 PM
  #16792  
JohnnyS
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Toronto, ON, CANADA
Posts: 666
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Not the Heinkel, no.

1. Less than 100 built.
2. It had automatic leading edge slats.
3. Two engines.
JohnnyS is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2019, 09:06 PM
  #16793  
Ernie P.
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bealeton, VA
Posts: 5,019
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Originally Posted by JohnnyS View Post
Not the Heinkel, no.

1. Less than 100 built.
2. It had automatic leading edge slats.
3. Two engines.
Okay, then. How about the E-1 Tracer or the C-1 Trader? Thanks; Ernie P.




The Grumman S-2 Tracker (S2F prior to 1962) was the first purpose-built, single airframe anti-submarine warfare (ASW) aircraft to enter service with the United States Navy. Designed and initially built by Grumman, the Tracker was of conventional design — propeller-driven with twin radial engines, a high wing that could be folded for storage on aircraft carriers, and tricycle undercarriage. The type was exported to a number of navies around the world. Introduced in 1952, the Tracker and its E-1 Tracer derivative saw service in the U.S. Navy until the mid-1970s, and its C-1 Trader derivative until the mid-1980s, with a few aircraft remaining in service with other air arms into the 21st century. Argentina and Brazil are the last countries to still use the Tracker.
Ernie P. is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2019, 09:39 PM
  #16794  
JohnnyS
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Toronto, ON, CANADA
Posts: 666
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Not the Grumman, sorry! But two new clues for your efforts.

1. Less than 100 built.
2. It had automatic leading edge slats.
3. Two engines.
4. The reason it had automatic leading edge slats was to improve combat manoeuvrability.
5. Maximum speed was in the transonic range.
JohnnyS is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2019, 03:55 PM
  #16795  
JohnnyS
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Toronto, ON, CANADA
Posts: 666
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

1. Less than 100 built.
2. It had automatic leading edge slats.
3. Two engines.
4. The reason it had automatic leading edge slats was to improve combat manoeuvrability.
5. Maximum speed was in the transonic range.
6. It was developed from a previous model that only had one engine.
JohnnyS is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2019, 04:39 AM
  #16796  
JohnnyS
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Toronto, ON, CANADA
Posts: 666
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

1. Less than 100 built.
2. It had automatic leading edge slats.
3. Two engines.
4. The reason it had automatic leading edge slats was to improve combat manoeuvrability.
5. Maximum speed was in the transonic range.
6. It was developed from a previous model that only had one engine.
7. Only operated by one country, although a prototype of an advanced version was evaluated by Switzerland.
JohnnyS is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2019, 06:23 PM
  #16797  
JohnnyS
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Toronto, ON, CANADA
Posts: 666
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

1. Less than 100 built.
2. It had automatic leading edge slats.
3. Two engines.
4. The reason it had automatic leading edge slats was to improve combat manoeuvrability.
5. Maximum speed was in the transonic range.
6. It was developed from a previous model that only had one engine.
7. Only operated by one country, although a prototype of an advanced version was evaluated by Switzerland.
8. The nickname for the aircraft was "Yankee".
JohnnyS is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2019, 08:47 PM
  #16798  
Ernie P.
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bealeton, VA
Posts: 5,019
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Originally Posted by JohnnyS View Post
1. Less than 100 built.
2. It had automatic leading edge slats.
3. Two engines.
4. The reason it had automatic leading edge slats was to improve combat manoeuvrability.
5. Maximum speed was in the transonic range.
6. It was developed from a previous model that only had one engine.
7. Only operated by one country, although a prototype of an advanced version was evaluated by Switzerland.
8. The nickname for the aircraft was "Yankee".
JohnnyS; I'm guessing from your last clue you want this solved. Okay; how about the Fiat G.91Y? Thanks; Ernie P.


Answer: Fiat G.91Y

The Fiat (later Aeritalia) G.91Y is an Italian ground-attack and reconnaissance aircraft which first flew in 1966. Resembling its predecessor, the Fiat G.91, the aircraft was a complete redesign, a major difference being its twin engines, rather than the original single engine.


Design and development

The G.91Y was an increased-performance version of the Fiat G.91 funded by the Italian government. Based on the G.91T two-seat trainer variant, the single Bristol Orpheus turbojet engine of this aircraft was replaced by two afterburning General Electric J85 turbojets which increased thrust by 60% over the single-engined variant. Structural modifications to reduce airframe weight increased performance further and an additional fuel tank occupying the space of the G.91T's rear seat provided extra range.

Combat manoeuvrability was improved with the addition of automatic leading edge slats.
The avionics equipment of the G.91Y was considerably upgraded with many of the American, British and Canadian systems being licence-manufactured in Italy. Flight testing of three pre-production aircraft was successful, with one aircraft reaching a maximum speed of Mach 0.98. Airframe buffeting was noted and was rectified in production aircraft by raising the position of the tailplane slightly. Production

An initial order of 55 aircraft for the Italian Air Force was completed by Fiat in March 1971, by which time the company had changed its name to Aeritalia (from 1969, when Fiat aviazione merged with Aerfer). The order was increased to 75 aircraft with 67 eventually being delivered. In fact, the development of the new G.91Y was quite long, and the first order was for about 20 pre-series examples that followed the two prototypes. The first pre-series 'Yankee' (the nickname of the new aircraft) flew in July 1968. AMI (Italian Air Force) placed orders for two batches, 35 fighters followed by another 20, later cut to ten. The last one was delivered around mid 1976, so the total was two prototypes, 20 pre-series and 45 series aircraft. No export success followed.

These aircraft served with 101° Gruppo/8° Stormo (Cervia-S.Giorgio) from 1970, and later, from 1974, they served with the 13° Gruppo/32° Stormo (Brindisi). Those 'Gruppi' (Italian equivalent of British 'squadrons', usually equipped with 18 aircraft) lasted until the early '90s, as the only ones equipped with the 'Yankee', using them as attack/recce machines, both over ground and sea, until the AMX replaced them.

Last edited by Ernie P.; 01-13-2019 at 08:50 PM.
Ernie P. is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2019, 04:30 AM
  #16799  
JohnnyS
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Toronto, ON, CANADA
Posts: 666
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Ding ding ding!!! We have a winner. The Fiat G.91Y was exactly the aircraft I was looking for.

Congratulations to Ernie P.!
JohnnyS is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2019, 10:30 AM
  #16800  
Ernie P.
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bealeton, VA
Posts: 5,019
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Originally Posted by JohnnyS View Post
Ding ding ding!!! We have a winner. The Fiat G.91Y was exactly the aircraft I was looking for.

Congratulations to Ernie P.!
Thank you, Sir; that was an interesting question about an interesting aircraft. I hope I have an equally interesting question for all of you. Thanks; Ernie P.




I've been going over my list of potential subjects for a question that will make all of you think "I didn't know that!". I hope I hit the mark.What warbird do I describe?

1. This aircraft was one of those which just missed service in the war in which it was designed.

2. It was actually in production at war’s end, but hadn’t actually reached field units.
Ernie P. is online now  
Reply With Quote

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service