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Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

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Old 01-31-2019, 07:47 PM
  #16876  
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Originally Posted by Hydro Junkie View Post
I heard that from a Tomcat pilot during work ups for my first cruise. He landed and, when he got out of his plane, was complaining about how he had to go to stage 1 to catch one of the Prowlers. His RIO followed that up with a statement about how he was tracking the Prowler and it was slowly pulling away when they were at full throttle. The Tomcat they were in was the -A, so who knows
I dont dispute the statement but if that isnt knowledge in the Prowler community.
Here is the Math from a friend who has quite a bit of Prowler history at his touch.Wow,

I haven't heard that one. Seems goofy. TF30-P-100 thrust (dry) = 14560 LBfJ52-P-408 thrust = 11200 LBfSo the only way a Prowler goes faster is if it has less drag. Assuming roughly equivalent weights for shipboard ops, and normal stores configurations, I'm having a hard time believing it. And of course, if we exceeded the .86 IMN limit on the pod rats, the Prowler would explode in a huge ball of fire. More importantly, if it were true wouldn't we have heard all the early Prowler guys brag about it?

We did a reconnoiter of the Sacotra anchorage off the North Coast of Africa. A traditional anchorage spot for the Soviet Fleet when in the Med.
We were standard Prowler load 3podsx2drops the A+ Tomcats had 2x2x2 FAMO as well as a Tomcat with TARPS pod which is the recce pod for taking pictures in several spectrum's.
We did two flybys and not any targeting radars came up so we left. I was flight lead until the return to the Saratoga. I transferred lead to the Tomcats and they started climbing and accelerating and I had to ask for a few % power to keep up, these were the big motors though.
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Old 01-31-2019, 08:29 PM
  #16877  
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Originally Posted by CF105 View Post
Looks like I've got the gears turning! No correct guesses (but some fine aircraft!). I'd say you've earned a bonus clue:

1 - A significant aircraft yet often considered “second best”.

2 - It’s “deficiencies” could be blamed on different design requirements compared to its stablemate.

3 - However those requirements resulted in a more versatile aircraft.

4 - Those who flew in them really liked them. Possibly even over their "better" stablemate.

5 - For one thing, if things went south, you were more likely to survive.


6 - A change of engine in later designs gave it a noticeable increase in performance, as well as increased reliability and survivability.

7 - Saw service with at least four nations.

8 - No airworthy examples exist today.


9 - Saw service in Europe, the Mediterranean, North Africa and he Far East.
Interesting how many "best and second best" pairings there were. How about the Bristol Beaufort/Beaufighter? Thanks; Ernie P.


Answer: Bristol Beaufort/Beaufighter The Bristol Beaufort (manufacturer designation Type 152) was a British twin-engined torpedo bomber designed by the Bristol Aeroplane Company, and developed from experience gained designing and building the earlier Blenheim light bomber. At least 1,180 Beauforts were built by Bristol and other British manufacturers.

The Australian government's Department of Aircraft Production (DAP) also manufactured variants of the Beaufort. These are often known collectively as the DAP Beaufort. More than 700 Australian-built Beauforts saw service with the Royal Australian Air Force in the South West Pacific theatre, where they were used until the end of the war. Beauforts first saw service with Royal Air Force Coastal Command and then the Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm from 1940. They were used as torpedo bombers, conventional bombers and mine-layers until 1942, when they were removed from active service and were then used as trainer aircraft until being declared obsolete in 1945. Beauforts also saw considerable action in the Mediterranean; Beaufort squadrons based in Egypt and on Malta helped interdict Axis shipping supplying Rommel's Deutsches Afrikakorps in North Africa. Although it was designed as a torpedo-bomber, the Beaufort was more often used as a medium day bomber. The Beaufort also flew more hours in training than on operational missions and more were lost through accidents and mechanical failures than were lost to enemy fire. The Beaufort was adapted as a long-range heavy fighter variant called the Beaufighter, which proved to be very successful and many Beaufort units eventually converted to the Beaufighter.
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Old 02-01-2019, 05:34 AM
  #16878  
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How about the B-26 The flying prostitute and its successor (Pick one) Douglas A-26 Invader, B-25, A-20 Havoc etc
Teething problems and airframe modifications improved its lackluster record.
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Old 02-01-2019, 06:08 PM
  #16879  
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Still no winners!

I'm late with today's clue, and I apologize. You've also earned a bonus:

1 - A significant aircraft yet often considered “second best”.

2 - It’s “deficiencies” could be blamed on different design requirements compared to its stablemate.

3 - However those requirements resulted in a more versatile aircraft.

4 - Those who flew in them really liked them. Possibly even over their "better" stablemate.

5 - For one thing, if things went south, you were more likely to survive.


6 - A change of engine in later designs gave it a noticeable increase in performance, as well as increased reliability and survivability.

7 - Saw service with at least four nations.

8 - No airworthy examples exist today.


9 - Saw service in Europe, the Mediterranean, North Africa and the Far East.

10 - Unusually for this type of aircraft, for a time some sported alternating black & white bands on the wings & aft fuselage.

11 - The manufacturer had long experience in building planes of this sort.
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Old 02-02-2019, 12:33 AM
  #16880  
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Clue 10 just pointed to either a British or American plane.
I'm going to change tacks slightly. How about a Catalina or Sunderland?
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Old 02-02-2019, 04:36 AM
  #16881  
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P-47 Thunderbolt?
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Old 02-02-2019, 08:57 AM
  #16882  
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I'm discovering that these quizzes are a double-edged challenge: not only on the side of those trying to figure out the aircraft, but for the person coming up with the clues!

Still no winner, but the attempts are worthy of an extra clue. So here's two more:

1 - A significant aircraft yet often considered “second best”.

2 - It’s “deficiencies” could be blamed on different design requirements compared to its stablemate.

3 - However those requirements resulted in a more versatile aircraft.

4 - Those who flew in them really liked them. Possibly even over their "better" stablemate.

5 - For one thing, if things went south, you were more likely to survive.


6 - A change of engine in later designs gave it a noticeable increase in performance, as well as increased reliability and survivability.

7 - Saw service with at least four nations.

8 - No airworthy examples exist today.


9 - Saw service in Europe, the Mediterranean, North Africa and the Far East.

10 - Unusually for this type of aircraft, for a time some sported alternating black & white bands on the wings & aft fuselage.

11 - The manufacturer had long experience in building planes of this sort.


12 - Took part in many large-scale actions, some of which were as much for propaganda as for practical purposes.

13 - Retired from it's primary purpose fairly soon after the war ended.
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Old 02-02-2019, 06:09 PM
  #16883  
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DH Hornet? successor to the mosquito kind of....
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Old 02-02-2019, 08:54 PM
  #16884  
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Not the Hornet, but here's a bonus clue for your efforts:

1 - A significant aircraft yet often considered “second best”.

2 - It’s “deficiencies” could be blamed on different design requirements compared to its stablemate.

3 - However those requirements resulted in a more versatile aircraft.

4 - Those who flew in them really liked them. Possibly even over their "better" stablemate.

5 - For one thing, if things went south, you were more likely to survive.


6 - A change of engine in later designs gave it a noticeable increase in performance, as well as increased reliability and survivability.

7 - Saw service with at least four nations.

8 - No airworthy examples exist today.


9 - Saw service in Europe, the Mediterranean, North Africa and the Far East.

10 - Unusually for this type of aircraft, for a time some sported alternating black & white bands on the wings & aft fuselage.

11 - The manufacturer had long experience in building planes of this sort.


12 - Took part in many large-scale actions, some of which were as much for propaganda as for practical purposes.

13 - Retired from it's primary purpose fairly soon after the war ended.


14 - Over 6,000 built.
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Old 02-04-2019, 04:32 PM
  #16885  
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Running late, but here is today's clue:

1 - A significant aircraft yet often considered “second best”.

2 - It’s “deficiencies” could be blamed on different design requirements compared to its stablemate.

3 - However those requirements resulted in a more versatile aircraft.

4 - Those who flew in them really liked them. Possibly even over their "better" stablemate.

5 - For one thing, if things went south, you were more likely to survive.


6 - A change of engine in later designs gave it a noticeable increase in performance, as well as increased reliability and survivability.

7 - Saw service with at least four nations.

8 - No airworthy examples exist today.


9 - Saw service in Europe, the Mediterranean, North Africa and the Far East.

10 - Unusually for this type of aircraft, for a time some sported alternating black & white bands on the wings & aft fuselage.

11 - The manufacturer had long experience in building planes of this sort.


12 - Took part in many large-scale actions, some of which were as much for propaganda as for practical purposes.

13 - Retired from it's primary purpose fairly soon after the war ended.


14 - Over 6,000 built.

15 - The first prototype took its first flight in October 1939.
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Old 02-04-2019, 11:20 PM
  #16886  
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How about the Douglas Dauntless?
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Old 02-05-2019, 06:25 PM
  #16887  
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Not the venerable Dauntless. Worth a bonus clue in addition to the daily.

Also, my availability for the next while is going to be... unpredictable. So I'm posting clues today that maybe won't quite give the game away, but will hopefully increase the odds of someone figuring it out:

1 - A significant aircraft yet often considered “second best”.

2 - It’s “deficiencies” could be blamed on different design requirements compared to its stablemate.

3 - However those requirements resulted in a more versatile aircraft.

4 - Those who flew in them really liked them. Possibly even over their "better" stablemate.

5 - For one thing, if things went south, you were more likely to survive.


6 - A change of engine in later designs gave it a noticeable increase in performance, as well as increased reliability and survivability.

7 - Saw service with at least four nations.

8 - No airworthy examples exist today.


9 - Saw service in Europe, the Mediterranean, North Africa and the Far East.

10 - Unusually for this type of aircraft, for a time some sported alternating black & white bands on the wings & aft fuselage.

11 - The manufacturer had long experience in building planes of this sort.


12 - Took part in many large-scale actions, some of which were as much for propaganda as for practical purposes.

13 - Retired from it's primary purpose fairly soon after the war ended.


14 - Over 6,000 built.

15 - The first prototype took its first flight in October 1939.

16 - In addition to its primary function, this aircraft was operated in ASW, ELINT, ECM and SOE roles.

17 - Among its aerial victories was an ME-163... shot down in a rare night encounter.
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Old 02-06-2019, 02:24 PM
  #16888  
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Today's clue

1 - A significant aircraft yet often considered “second best”.

2 - It’s “deficiencies” could be blamed on different design requirements compared to its stablemate.

3 - However those requirements resulted in a more versatile aircraft.

4 - Those who flew in them really liked them. Possibly even over their "better" stablemate.

5 - For one thing, if things went south, you were more likely to survive.


6 - A change of engine in later designs gave it a noticeable increase in performance, as well as increased reliability and survivability.

7 - Saw service with at least four nations.

8 - No airworthy examples exist today.


9 - Saw service in Europe, the Mediterranean, North Africa and the Far East.

10 - Unusually for this type of aircraft, for a time some sported alternating black & white bands on the wings & aft fuselage.

11 - The manufacturer had long experience in building planes of this sort.


12 - Took part in many large-scale actions, some of which were as much for propaganda as for practical purposes.

13 - Retired from it's primary purpose fairly soon after the war ended.


14 - Over 6,000 built.

15 - The first prototype took its first flight in October 1939.

16 - In addition to its primary function, this aircraft was operated in ASW, ELINT, ECM and SOE roles.

17 - Among its aerial victories was an ME-163... shot down in a rare night encounter.


18 - Three complete examples are known to exist, one of which is cobbled together from several different airframes.
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Old 02-07-2019, 02:19 AM
  #16889  
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How about the P-38 Lightning?
Better still, the B-24 Liberator?
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Old 02-07-2019, 05:41 AM
  #16890  
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Originally Posted by Hydro Junkie View Post
How about the P-38 Lightning?
Better still, the B-24 Liberator?
Both of those still exist and several still flying, I'm thinking a Axis airplane.
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Old 02-07-2019, 09:07 AM
  #16891  
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Neither of those, but qualifies for a bonus clue.

1 - A significant aircraft yet often considered “second best”.

2 - It’s “deficiencies” could be blamed on different design requirements compared to its stablemate.

3 - However those requirements resulted in a more versatile aircraft.

4 - Those who flew in them really liked them. Possibly even over their "better" stablemate.

5 - For one thing, if things went south, you were more likely to survive.


6 - A change of engine in later designs gave it a noticeable increase in performance, as well as increased reliability and survivability.

7 - Saw service with at least four nations.

8 - No airworthy examples exist today.


9 - Saw service in Europe, the Mediterranean, North Africa and the Far East.

10 - Unusually for this type of aircraft, for a time some sported alternating black & white bands on the wings & aft fuselage.

11 - The manufacturer had long experience in building planes of this sort.


12 - Took part in many large-scale actions, some of which were as much for propaganda as for practical purposes.

13 - Retired from it's primary purpose fairly soon after the war ended.


14 - Over 6,000 built.

15 - The first prototype took its first flight in October 1939.

16 - In addition to its primary function, this aircraft was operated in ASW, ELINT, ECM and SOE roles.

17 - Among its aerial victories was an ME-163... shot down in a rare night encounter.


18 - Three complete examples are known to exist, one of which is cobbled together from several different airframes.

19 - There are apparently efforts (or at least plans) to recover at least two other wrecks.

20 - Part of one wreck was melted down and used in part of a long-overdue and somewhat controversial memorial.
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Old 02-07-2019, 10:19 AM
  #16892  
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I think it's the Handley Page Halifax. The clues about the three complete examples and the memorial seem to nail it down.
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Old 02-07-2019, 01:57 PM
  #16893  
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Originally Posted by Top_Gunn View Post
I think it's the Handley Page Halifax. The clues about the three complete examples and the memorial seem to nail it down.
We have a winner!

The specifications set out for the Halifax required it to fit in existing RAF hangars, and also be capable of other roles besides “heavy bomber”. It’s stablemate the Lancaster was under no such limitations. The early versions were Merlin powered, but the switch to the radial Hercules engines really boosted performance.

Bomber command brass much preferred the Lancaster, as it could carry larger bomber, further and at a higher altitude. Crews preferred the “Halibag” as it was more comfortable and easier to move around in. Not to mention your chances of surviving in a crash were better than in a Lanc.

there are two restored airframes, one in Canada and the other in the UK. A third airframe is on display “as found”, also in the UK.

Glider towing Halifaxes wore invasion stripes during D-Day. Others were converted to carry paratroopers and insert SOE operatives.
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Old 02-07-2019, 03:42 PM
  #16894  
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Originally Posted by CF105 View Post

We have a winner!

The specifications set out for the Halifax required it to fit in existing RAF hangars, and also be capable of other roles besides “heavy bomber”. It’s stablemate the Lancaster was under no such limitations. The early versions were Merlin powered, but the switch to the radial Hercules engines really boosted performance.

Bomber command brass much preferred the Lancaster, as it could carry larger bomber, further and at a higher altitude. Crews preferred the “Halibag” as it was more comfortable and easier to move around in. Not to mention your chances of surviving in a crash were better than in a Lanc.

there are two restored airframes, one in Canada and the other in the UK. A third airframe is on display “as found”, also in the UK.

Glider towing Halifaxes wore invasion stripes during D-Day. Others were converted to carry paratroopers and insert SOE operatives.
Well done, Sir! An outstanding question! And congratulations to Top_Gunn for figuring it out. I've been hanging back a bit because I will be tied up for several days starting this weekend. Now: let's see what Al will pose for the gallery. Thanks; Ernie P.
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Old 02-07-2019, 08:37 PM
  #16895  
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Originally Posted by elmshoot View Post
Both of those still exist and several still flying, I'm thinking a Axis airplane.
It couldn't be an Axis plane since it wore invasion stripes. That meant it had to be a US or British aircraft. I was looking at planes that today are very rare and had over 6000 built. It wasn't until a few years ago that a P-38, now named "Glacier Girl" was recovered and restored from under tons of ice in Greenland. I was looking at the possibility that the clue of no flying examples has become out of date.
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Old 02-07-2019, 09:11 PM
  #16896  
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Originally Posted by Hydro Junkie View Post
It couldn't be an Axis plane since it wore invasion stripes. That meant it had to be a US or British aircraft. I was looking at planes that today are very rare and had over 6000 built. It wasn't until a few years ago that a P-38, now named "Glacier Girl" was recovered and restored from under tons of ice in Greenland. I was looking at the possibility that the clue of no flying examples has become out of date.
Sir; I'm pretty sure their are several P-38's flying today and for at least the past several years. I know I've seen at least a couple of them. Thanks; Ernie P.
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Old 02-07-2019, 11:59 PM
  #16897  
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And I have to agree. Some sources, however, don't get updated and may say none are presently airworthy when several may have been restored. Until I started looking, I thought there was only one B-24 in flying shape, only to learn there are actually three of them. As for B-17s, there are only 39 left in the US, that are known to exist. The latest "recovered" B-17 has been renamed "Swamp Ghost", after being recovered from a swamp in New Guinea and reassembled on Ford Island at Pearl Harbor. The air museum on Ford Island could restore the Swamp Ghost and get it into flying condition as it's actually in fairly good shape since it was "bellied in" due to lack of fuel rather than being shot down. The powers that be have decided to leave it in it's crashed condition and just display it, for the time being anyway. Not so sure I agree with that since a flying B-17 would be much more of an attraction, to me anyway, than a damaged plane sitting on jacks. Then again, there are only 39 B-17s remaining, of which only 10 are in flying condition, 17 are being used for static display with the remaining 12, the Swamp Ghost included, scheduled for or being restored.

Last edited by Hydro Junkie; 02-08-2019 at 05:10 AM.
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Old 02-08-2019, 05:27 AM
  #16898  
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That was a very good quiz for me. Learned a lot. Here we go again with another warbird which has no airworthy survivors.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Small, light, and fast.

2. Crew of one.

3. Came along too late in its war to be used in combat.
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Old 02-08-2019, 08:03 AM
  #16899  
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Originally Posted by Ernie P. View Post
Sir; I'm pretty sure their are several P-38's flying today and for at least the past several years. I know I've seen at least a couple of them. Thanks; Ernie P.
These guys list two current restorations and one past resoraions. All aircraft are or will be in factory flying condition on completion. This company purchased all of the Lockheed P-38 tooling and factory drawings. I visited their facility 3 or 4 years ago and their work is fantastic!

https://www.westpacrestorations.com/...-38-lightening
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Old 02-08-2019, 09:16 AM
  #16900  
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Originally Posted by FlyerInOKC View Post
These guys list two current restorations and one past resoraions. All aircraft are or will be in factory flying condition on completion. This company purchased all of the Lockheed P-38 tooling and factory drawings. I visited their facility 3 or 4 years ago and their work is fantastic!

https://www.westpacrestorations.com/...-38-lightening
That's good news. I saw one flying P-38 at a small private museum in southern California; another at a museum near (I believe) Wright-Patterson AFB; another a couple of times at the Culpeper, VA Airfest, during the first "Potomac Flight" a few years back. Again, that's just my personal observations. Thanks; Ernie P.
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