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Old 09-09-2019, 09:20 AM
  #17501  
Ernie P.
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Afternoon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This warbird is not particularly well know.

2. Although it bears a very famous name.

3. And it was flown by a very famous ace.

4. Who scored several victories in this aircraft.

5. A couple of hundred were produced, which was a respectable number at the time.

6. This was essentially the final model of a series of three aircraft.

7. The first two of the series had their model numbers reversed; i.e., model 2 came before model 1.

8. And they were delivered to front line units about the same time.

9. The lengthened and strengthened fuselage had to be redesigned to accommodate a longer and heavier engine; and the wing of the second of the earlier models was used.

10. While the performance was improved, when compared to the earlier models, the famous ace still considered the plane to be a bit slow.

11. Added to its rather indifferent maneuverability, it wasn’t a star performer.
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Old 09-09-2019, 02:38 PM
  #17502  
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Evening clue. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This warbird is not particularly well know.

2. Although it bears a very famous name.

3. And it was flown by a very famous ace.

4. Who scored several victories in this aircraft.

5. A couple of hundred were produced, which was a respectable number at the time.

6. This was essentially the final model of a series of three aircraft.

7. The first two of the series had their model numbers reversed; i.e., model 2 came before model 1.

8. And they were delivered to front line units about the same time.

9. The lengthened and strengthened fuselage had to be redesigned to accommodate a longer and heavier engine; and the wing of the second of the earlier models was used.

10. While the performance was improved, when compared to the earlier models, the famous ace still considered the plane to be a bit slow.

11. Added to its rather indifferent maneuverability, it wasn’t a star performer.

12. And when charges of shoddy construction were brought forward, the type quickly fell from favor.
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Old 09-10-2019, 01:58 AM
  #17503  
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Morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This warbird is not particularly well know.

2. Although it bears a very famous name.

3. And it was flown by a very famous ace.

4. Who scored several victories in this aircraft.

5. A couple of hundred were produced, which was a respectable number at the time.

6. This was essentially the final model of a series of three aircraft.

7. The first two of the series had their model numbers reversed; i.e., model 2 came before model 1.

8. And they were delivered to front line units about the same time.

9. The lengthened and strengthened fuselage had to be redesigned to accommodate a longer and heavier engine; and the wing of the second of the earlier models was used.

10. While the performance was improved, when compared to the earlier models, the famous ace still considered the plane to be a bit slow.

11. Added to its rather indifferent maneuverability, it wasn’t a star performer.

12. And when charges of shoddy construction were brought forward, the type quickly fell from favor.

13. Engine difficulties included everything from manufacturing difficulties, early wear issues, cooling and lack of performance at altitude.
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Old 09-10-2019, 12:25 PM
  #17504  
Ernie P.
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Afternoon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This warbird is not particularly well know.

2. Although it bears a very famous name.

3. And it was flown by a very famous ace.

4. Who scored several victories in this aircraft.

5. A couple of hundred were produced, which was a respectable number at the time.

6. This was essentially the final model of a series of three aircraft.

7. The first two of the series had their model numbers reversed; i.e., model 2 came before model 1.

8. And they were delivered to front line units about the same time.

9. The lengthened and strengthened fuselage had to be redesigned to accommodate a longer and heavier engine; and the wing of the second of the earlier models was used.

10. While the performance was improved, when compared to the earlier models, the famous ace still considered the plane to be a bit slow.

11. Added to its rather indifferent maneuverability, it wasn’t a star performer.

12. And when charges of shoddy construction were brought forward, the type quickly fell from favor.

13. Engine difficulties included everything from manufacturing difficulties, early wear issues, cooling and lack of performance at altitude.

14. The famous ace mentioned in (3) suggested the type be withdrawn from the main fronts and used only in quieter areas; and this was done.
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Old 09-10-2019, 06:41 PM
  #17505  
Ernie P.
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Evening clue. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This warbird is not particularly well know.

2. Although it bears a very famous name.

3. And it was flown by a very famous ace.

4. Who scored several victories in this aircraft.

5. A couple of hundred were produced, which was a respectable number at the time.

6. This was essentially the final model of a series of three aircraft.

7. The first two of the series had their model numbers reversed; i.e., model 2 came before model 1.

8. And they were delivered to front line units about the same time.

9. The lengthened and strengthened fuselage had to be redesigned to accommodate a longer and heavier engine; and the wing of the second of the earlier models was used.

10. While the performance was improved, when compared to the earlier models, the famous ace still considered the plane to be a bit slow.

11. Added to its rather indifferent maneuverability, it wasn’t a star performer.

12. And when charges of shoddy construction were brought forward, the type quickly fell from favor.

13. Engine difficulties included everything from manufacturing difficulties, early wear issues, cooling and lack of performance at altitude.

14. The famous ace mentioned in (3) suggested the type be withdrawn from the main fronts and used only in quieter areas; and this was done.

15. Even though our subject aircraft failed to impress the aforementioned ace, its performance definitely impressed one enemy aviator; who pursued what he thought would be an easy kill.
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Old 09-11-2019, 01:45 AM
  #17506  
Ernie P.
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Morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This warbird is not particularly well know.

2. Although it bears a very famous name.

3. And it was flown by a very famous ace.

4. Who scored several victories in this aircraft.

5. A couple of hundred were produced, which was a respectable number at the time.

6. This was essentially the final model of a series of three aircraft.

7. The first two of the series had their model numbers reversed; i.e., model 2 came before model 1.

8. And they were delivered to front line units about the same time.

9. The lengthened and strengthened fuselage had to be redesigned to accommodate a longer and heavier engine; and the wing of the second of the earlier models was used.

10. While the performance was improved, when compared to the earlier models, the famous ace still considered the plane to be a bit slow.

11. Added to its rather indifferent maneuverability, it wasn’t a star performer.

12. And when charges of shoddy construction were brought forward, the type quickly fell from favor.

13. Engine difficulties included everything from manufacturing difficulties, early wear issues, cooling and lack of performance at altitude.

14. The famous ace mentioned in (3) suggested the type be withdrawn from the main fronts and used only in quieter areas; and this was done.

15. Even though our subject aircraft failed to impress the aforementioned ace, its performance definitely impressed one enemy aviator; who pursued what he thought would be an easy kill.

16. He followed the ace, leaving his own flight. When the ace finally turned on him, he was shot down and spent the rest of the war as a POW. He wrote that the enemy plane climbed very well, and easily out maneuvered his own fighter.
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Old 09-11-2019, 08:46 AM
  #17507  
Ernie P.
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Afternoon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This warbird is not particularly well know.

2. Although it bears a very famous name.

3. And it was flown by a very famous ace.

4. Who scored several victories in this aircraft.

5. A couple of hundred were produced, which was a respectable number at the time.

6. This was essentially the final model of a series of three aircraft.

7. The first two of the series had their model numbers reversed; i.e., model 2 came before model 1.

8. And they were delivered to front line units about the same time.

9. The lengthened and strengthened fuselage had to be redesigned to accommodate a longer and heavier engine; and the wing of the second of the earlier models was used.

10. While the performance was improved, when compared to the earlier models, the famous ace still considered the plane to be a bit slow.

11. Added to its rather indifferent maneuverability, it wasn’t a star performer.

12. And when charges of shoddy construction were brought forward, the type quickly fell from favor.

13. Engine difficulties included everything from manufacturing difficulties, early wear issues, cooling and lack of performance at altitude.

14. The famous ace mentioned in (3) suggested the type be withdrawn from the main fronts and used only in quieter areas; and this was done.

15. Even though our subject aircraft failed to impress the aforementioned ace, its performance definitely impressed one enemy aviator; who pursued what he thought would be an easy kill.

16. He followed the ace, leaving his own flight. When the ace finally turned on him, he was shot down and spent the rest of the war as a POW. He wrote that the enemy plane climbed very well, and easily out maneuvered his own fighter.

17. Perhaps one reason our subject aircraft was disparaged had to do with the fact another aircraft was about to appear; one which would become iconic for its performance.
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Old 09-11-2019, 01:29 PM
  #17508  
Ernie P.
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Evening clue. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This warbird is not particularly well know.

2. Although it bears a very famous name.

3. And it was flown by a very famous ace.

4. Who scored several victories in this aircraft.

5. A couple of hundred were produced, which was a respectable number at the time.

6. This was essentially the final model of a series of three aircraft.

7. The first two of the series had their model numbers reversed; i.e., model 2 came before model 1.

8. And they were delivered to front line units about the same time.

9. The lengthened and strengthened fuselage had to be redesigned to accommodate a longer and heavier engine; and the wing of the second of the earlier models was used.

10. While the performance was improved, when compared to the earlier models, the famous ace still considered the plane to be a bit slow.

11. Added to its rather indifferent maneuverability, it wasn’t a star performer.

12. And when charges of shoddy construction were brought forward, the type quickly fell from favor.

13. Engine difficulties included everything from manufacturing difficulties, early wear issues, cooling and lack of performance at altitude.

14. The famous ace mentioned in (3) suggested the type be withdrawn from the main fronts and used only in quieter areas; and this was done.

15. Even though our subject aircraft failed to impress the aforementioned ace, its performance definitely impressed one enemy aviator; who pursued what he thought would be an easy kill.

16. He followed the ace, leaving his own flight. When the ace finally turned on him, he was shot down and spent the rest of the war as a POW. He wrote that the enemy plane climbed very well, and easily out maneuvered his own fighter.

17. Perhaps one reason our subject aircraft was disparaged had to do with the fact another aircraft was about to appear; one which would become iconic for its performance.

18. One of our subject aircraft was disassembled and carefully inspected by the owning air force. The inspection revealed shoddy workmanship in the fuselage and tail surfaces, although the wings were acceptable. After that, the aircraft was not allowed to fly against first line opposition; although production continued.
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Old 09-12-2019, 02:04 AM
  #17509  
Ernie P.
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Morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This warbird is not particularly well know.

2. Although it bears a very famous name.

3. And it was flown by a very famous ace.

4. Who scored several victories in this aircraft.

5. A couple of hundred were produced, which was a respectable number at the time.

6. This was essentially the final model of a series of three aircraft.

7. The first two of the series had their model numbers reversed; i.e., model 2 came before model 1.

8. And they were delivered to front line units about the same time.

9. The lengthened and strengthened fuselage had to be redesigned to accommodate a longer and heavier engine; and the wing of the second of the earlier models was used.

10. While the performance was improved, when compared to the earlier models, the famous ace still considered the plane to be a bit slow.

11. Added to its rather indifferent maneuverability, it wasn’t a star performer.

12. And when charges of shoddy construction were brought forward, the type quickly fell from favor.

13. Engine difficulties included everything from manufacturing difficulties, early wear issues, cooling and lack of performance at altitude.

14. The famous ace mentioned in (3) suggested the type be withdrawn from the main fronts and used only in quieter areas; and this was done.

15. Even though our subject aircraft failed to impress the aforementioned ace, its performance definitely impressed one enemy aviator; who pursued what he thought would be an easy kill.

16. He followed the ace, leaving his own flight. When the ace finally turned on him, he was shot down and spent the rest of the war as a POW. He wrote that the enemy plane climbed very well, and easily out maneuvered his own fighter.

17. Perhaps one reason our subject aircraft was disparaged had to do with the fact another aircraft was about to appear; one which would become iconic for its performance.

18. One of our subject aircraft was disassembled and carefully inspected by the owning air force. The inspection revealed shoddy workmanship in the fuselage and tail surfaces, although the wings were acceptable. After that, the aircraft was not allowed to fly against first line opposition; although production continued.

19. Later production aircraft replaced the wing warping system with horn-balanced ailerons.
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Old 09-12-2019, 08:32 AM
  #17510  
Ernie P.
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Afternoon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This warbird is not particularly well know.

2. Although it bears a very famous name.

3. And it was flown by a very famous ace.

4. Who scored several victories in this aircraft.

5. A couple of hundred were produced, which was a respectable number at the time.

6. This was essentially the final model of a series of three aircraft.

7. The first two of the series had their model numbers reversed; i.e., model 2 came before model 1.

8. And they were delivered to front line units about the same time.

9. The lengthened and strengthened fuselage had to be redesigned to accommodate a longer and heavier engine; and the wing of the second of the earlier models was used.

10. While the performance was improved, when compared to the earlier models, the famous ace still considered the plane to be a bit slow.

11. Added to its rather indifferent maneuverability, it wasn’t a star performer.

12. And when charges of shoddy construction were brought forward, the type quickly fell from favor.

13. Engine difficulties included everything from manufacturing difficulties, early wear issues, cooling and lack of performance at altitude.

14. The famous ace mentioned in (3) suggested the type be withdrawn from the main fronts and used only in quieter areas; and this was done.

15. Even though our subject aircraft failed to impress the aforementioned ace, its performance definitely impressed one enemy aviator; who pursued what he thought would be an easy kill.

16. He followed the ace, leaving his own flight. When the ace finally turned on him, he was shot down and spent the rest of the war as a POW. He wrote that the enemy plane climbed very well, and easily out maneuvered his own fighter.

17. Perhaps one reason our subject aircraft was disparaged had to do with the fact another aircraft was about to appear; one which would become iconic for its performance.

18. One of our subject aircraft was disassembled and carefully inspected by the owning air force. The inspection revealed shoddy workmanship in the fuselage and tail surfaces, although the wings were acceptable. After that, the aircraft was not allowed to fly against first line opposition; although production continued.

19. Later production aircraft replaced the wing warping system with horn-balanced ailerons.

20. Some aircraft were supplied to a foreign air force; and served until well after the war.
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Old 09-12-2019, 01:26 PM
  #17511  
Ernie P.
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Evening clue. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This warbird is not particularly well know.

2. Although it bears a very famous name.

3. And it was flown by a very famous ace.

4. Who scored several victories in this aircraft.

5. A couple of hundred were produced, which was a respectable number at the time.

6. This was essentially the final model of a series of three aircraft.

7. The first two of the series had their model numbers reversed; i.e., model 2 came before model 1.

8. And they were delivered to front line units about the same time.

9. The lengthened and strengthened fuselage had to be redesigned to accommodate a longer and heavier engine; and the wing of the second of the earlier models was used.

10. While the performance was improved, when compared to the earlier models, the famous ace still considered the plane to be a bit slow.

11. Added to its rather indifferent maneuverability, it wasn’t a star performer.

12. And when charges of shoddy construction were brought forward, the type quickly fell from favor.

13. Engine difficulties included everything from manufacturing difficulties, early wear issues, cooling and lack of performance at altitude.

14. The famous ace mentioned in (3) suggested the type be withdrawn from the main fronts and used only in quieter areas; and this was done.

15. Even though our subject aircraft failed to impress the aforementioned ace, its performance definitely impressed one enemy aviator; who pursued what he thought would be an easy kill.

16. He followed the ace, leaving his own flight. When the ace finally turned on him, he was shot down and spent the rest of the war as a POW. He wrote that the enemy plane climbed very well, and easily out maneuvered his own fighter.

17. Perhaps one reason our subject aircraft was disparaged had to do with the fact another aircraft was about to appear; one which would become iconic for its performance.

18. One of our subject aircraft was disassembled and carefully inspected by the owning air force. The inspection revealed shoddy workmanship in the fuselage and tail surfaces, although the wings were acceptable. After that, the aircraft was not allowed to fly against first line opposition; although production continued.

19. Later production aircraft replaced the wing warping system with horn-balanced ailerons.

20. Some aircraft were supplied to a foreign air force; and served until well after the war.

21. Wingspan was a bit less than 30 feet.
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Old 09-12-2019, 01:45 PM
  #17512  
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Fokker D.III
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Old 09-12-2019, 01:53 PM
  #17513  
Ernie P.
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Originally Posted by JohnnyS View Post
Fokker D.III
JohnnyS; this is getting to be a habit, but you nailed it again! Good show! And now you are up again. The Fokker D.III is one of those forgotten aircraft of WWI, but it is quite often mentioned in accounts of the time. And many people think the Albatros D.I was the first scout aircraft with twin machine guns, but the Fokker D.III was certainly earlier. Not to mention there were twin machine guns on the E.II; and three on the E.III, as well. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This warbird is not particularly well know.

2. Although it bears a very famous name.

3. And it was flown by a very famous ace.

4. Who scored several victories in this aircraft.

5. A couple of hundred were produced, which was a respectable number at the time.

6. This was essentially the final model of a series of three aircraft.

7. The first two of the series had their model numbers reversed; i.e., model 2 came before model 1.

8. And they were delivered to front line units about the same time.

9. The lengthened and strengthened fuselage had to be redesigned to accommodate a longer and heavier engine; and the wing of the second of the earlier models was used.

10. While the performance was improved, when compared to the earlier models, the famous ace still considered the plane to be a bit slow.

11. Added to its rather indifferent maneuverability, it wasn’t a star performer.

12. And when charges of shoddy construction were brought forward, the type quickly fell from favor.

13. Engine difficulties included everything from manufacturing difficulties, early wear issues, cooling and lack of performance at altitude.

14. The famous ace mentioned in (3) suggested the type be withdrawn from the main fronts and used only in quieter areas; and this was done.

15. Even though our subject aircraft failed to impress the aforementioned ace, its performance definitely impressed one enemy aviator; who pursued what he thought would be an easy kill.

16. He followed the ace, leaving his own flight. When the ace finally turned on him, he was shot down and spent the rest of the war as a POW. He wrote that the enemy plane climbed very well, and easily out maneuvered his own fighter.

17. Perhaps one reason our subject aircraft was disparaged had to do with the fact another aircraft was about to appear; one which would become iconic for its performance.

18. One of our subject aircraft was disassembled and carefully inspected by the owning air force. The inspection revealed shoddy workmanship in the fuselage and tail surfaces, although the wings were acceptable. After that, the aircraft was not allowed to fly against first line opposition; although production continued.

19. Later production aircraft replaced the wing warping system with horn-balanced ailerons.

20. Some aircraft were supplied to a foreign air force; and served until well after the war.

21. Wingspan was a bit less than 30 feet.

22. Length was a bit under 21 feet.

23. Dry weight was just under 1,000 pounds, and gross weight was a bit more than 1,500 pounds.

24. Speed was right at 100 mph.

25. And service ceiling was just over 15,000 feet.

26. Single seater; single engine.

27. Rate of climb was just under 1,000 feet per minute.

28. Twin machine guns.

29. The aces aircraft survived the war and was displayed in a museum until it was destroyed in a subsequent war.









Answer: The Fokker D.III



The Fokker D.III (Fokker designation M.19) was a German single-seat fighter aircraft of World War I. It was the last Fokker front-line design to use wing warping for roll control as originally designed, before ailerons had been introduced to Fokker combat designs.

Design and development

The M.19 began as an effort to improve the performance of the Fokker D.II (Fokker designation M.17). The M.19 featured the Oberursel U.III 14-cylinder, two-row rotary engine, combined with the two-bay wing cellule of the Fokker D.I. The U.III engine, first used in the Fokker E.IV, required a revised fore-and-aft mount and a strengthened fuselage. The prototype M.19 arrived at Adlershof for testing on 20 July 1916. Idflieg issued a production order for 50 aircraft at that time, followed by orders for an additional 60 aircraft in August and 100 in November. The new aircraft was designated D.III by Idflieg.

Operational history

The first seven production aircraft were delivered on 1 September 1916.[3] On that date, two D.III aircraft were ferried from Armee Flug Park 1 to Jagdstaffel 2 at Bertincourt.[4]Oswald Boelcke received serial 352/16 and obtained seven victories in it between 2 September and 15 September.[5] While the D.III offered better performance than the D.I and D.II, Boelcke nevertheless found the D.III to be too slow.[6]
[7]
The D.III was plagued by its U.III engine, which wore out quickly and was difficult to manufacture.[8] Low compression resulted in poor performance at altitude[9] and cooling of the rear row of cylinders proved problematic. Moreover, the D.III offered indifferent maneuverability.[10] On Boelcke's recommendation, the D.III was withdrawn from heavily contested sectors of the Western Front, but it continued to serve in quieter sectors.[6] In early October 1916, evaluation of Fokker's M.21 prototype at Adlershof revealed poor construction and workmanship.[3] In response, Idflieg directed that a production D.III be tested for quality control purposes.[3] In November 1916, serial 369/16 was disassembled and tested to destruction at Adlershof.[11] While the wings proved acceptable, the fuselage and tail surfaces failed to meet specifications.[3]
[11]
Idflieg reprimanded Fokker for his firm's substandard construction practices, but permitted D.III production to continue.[3] The Kogenluft, however, forbade the use of Fokker aircraft for frontline duties.[3] Fokker built 210 D.III aircraft at its Schwerin factory before production ceased in the spring of 1917. Late production aircraft replaced the wing-warping system with horn-balanced ailerons on the upper wing. Though unsuitable for frontline service, the D.III continued to serve in home defense units until late 1917.[6] In October 1917, Germany supplied 10 D.IIIs to the Netherlands.[12] These aircraft remained in service with the Luchtvaartafdeling until 1921. Boelcke's D.III, serial 352/16, survived the war to be displayed at the Zeughaus museum in Berlin. The aircraft was destroyed by an Allied bombing raid in 1943.

Operators

German Empire· · LuftstreitkräfteNetherlands· Luchtvaartafdeling

Specifications



General characteristics· · Crew: one pilot· · Length: 6.30 m (20 ft 8 in)· · Wingspan: 9.05 m (29 ft 8 in)· · Height: 2.55 m (8 ft 4 in)· · Wing area: 20.0 m2 (215 ft2)· · Empty weight: 430 kg (948 lb)· · Gross weight: 710 kg (1,565 lb)· · Powerplant: 1 × Oberursel U.III, 120 kW (160 hp)

Performance· · Maximum speed: 160 km/h (100 mph)· · Range: 220 km (137 miles)· · Service ceiling: 4,700 m (15,420 ft)· · Rate of climb: 4.8 m/s (940 ft/min)

Armament· · 2 × fixed 7.92 mm (.312 in) lMG 08 Spandau machine guns
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Old 09-13-2019, 09:26 AM
  #17514  
JohnnyS
 
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Well, darn. Now I have to come up with a quiz.

(BTW, it was the mention of wing warping that put me on the right track to figure out the Fokker D.III.)

OK, new quiz:

1. Built by an American manufacturer.
2. Developed from an earlier racing aircraft.
3. Fewer than 50 built.
4. Only used in the USA as a training aid.
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Old 09-13-2019, 11:04 AM
  #17515  
Ernie P.
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Originally Posted by JohnnyS View Post
Well, darn. Now I have to come up with a quiz.

(BTW, it was the mention of wing warping that put me on the right track to figure out the Fokker D.III.)

OK, new quiz:

1. Built by an American manufacturer.
2. Developed from an earlier racing aircraft.
3. Fewer than 50 built.
4. Only used in the USA as a training aid.
JohnnyS; I figured the wing warping clue might engender a few guesses, especially as Fokker was noted for still using the system. As to your current question, let's get the obvious out of the way, first. How about the Curtiss Hawk? Thanks; Ernie P.


The Curtiss F6C Hawk was a late 1920s American naval biplane fighter aircraft. It was part of the long line of Curtiss Hawk airplanes built by the Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company for the American military.Originally designed for land-based use, the Model 34C was virtually identical to the P-1 Hawk in United States Army Air Corps service.

The United States Navy ordered nine, but starting with the sixth example, they were strengthened for carrier-borne operations and redesignated Model 34D. Flown from the carriers Langley and Lexington from 1927–30, most of the later variants passed to Marine fighter-bomber units, while a few were flown for a time as twin-float seaplanes.
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Old 09-13-2019, 11:19 AM
  #17516  
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Not the Hawk, no. There were less than 50 of this aircraft built, and there were more Hawks built than that.

New Clues!

1. Built by an American manufacturer.
2. Developed from an earlier racing aircraft.
3. Fewer than 50 built.
4. Only used in the USA as a training aid.
5. It was originally designed for export to a particular country, but was never delivered. It did wind up being exported to two other countries where it served briefly.
6. Crew of two.
7. 14 cylinder radial engine.
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Old 09-14-2019, 05:50 AM
  #17517  
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New Clues!

1. Built by an American manufacturer.
2. Developed from an earlier racing aircraft.
3. Fewer than 50 built.
4. Only used in the USA as a training aid.
5. It was originally designed for export to a particular country, but was never delivered. It did wind up being exported to two other countries where it served briefly.
6. Crew of two.
7. 14 cylinder radial engine.
8. The first batch built was painted in Air France livery to try to get around an export prohibition.
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Old 09-15-2019, 05:43 AM
  #17518  
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New Clue!

1. Built by an American manufacturer.
2. Developed from an earlier racing aircraft.
3. Fewer than 50 built.
4. Only used in the USA as a training aid.
5. It was originally designed for export to a particular country, but was never delivered. It did wind up being exported to two other countries where it served briefly.
6. Crew of two.
7. 14 cylinder radial engine.
8. The first batch built was painted in Air France livery to try to get around an export prohibition.
9. One of the countries that operated this aircraft was China.
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Old 09-16-2019, 05:08 AM
  #17519  
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New Clue!

1. Built by an American manufacturer.
2. Developed from an earlier racing aircraft.
3. Fewer than 50 built.
4. Only used in the USA as a training aid.
5. It was originally designed for export to a particular country, but was never delivered. It did wind up being exported to two other countries where it served briefly.
6. Crew of two.
7. 14 cylinder radial engine.
8. The first batch built was painted in Air France livery to try to get around an export prohibition.
9. One of the countries that operated this aircraft was China.
10. And the other country that operated this aircraft was Mexico.
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Old 09-17-2019, 04:38 AM
  #17520  
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New Clue!

1. Built by an American manufacturer.
2. Developed from an earlier racing aircraft.
3. Fewer than 50 built.
4. Only used in the USA as a training aid.
5. It was originally designed for export to a particular country, but was never delivered. It did wind up being exported to two other countries where it served briefly.
6. Crew of two.
7. 14 cylinder radial engine.
8. The first batch built was painted in Air France livery to try to get around an export prohibition.
9. One of the countries that operated this aircraft was China.
10. And the other country that operated this aircraft was Mexico.
11. The earlier racing aircraft mentioned in clue #1 set a transatlantic speed record.
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Old 09-17-2019, 07:56 AM
  #17521  
elmshoot
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P-35?
Just back from the Reno Air races
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Old 09-17-2019, 08:53 AM
  #17522  
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Not the P-35, no.

New Clue!

1. Built by an American manufacturer.
2. Developed from an earlier racing aircraft.
3. Fewer than 50 built.
4. Only used in the USA as a training aid.
5. It was originally designed for export to a particular country, but was never delivered. It did wind up being exported to two other countries where it served briefly.
6. Crew of two.
7. 14 cylinder radial engine.
8. The first batch built was painted in Air France livery to try to get around an export prohibition.
9. One of the countries that operated this aircraft was China.
10. And the other country that operated this aircraft was Mexico.
11. The earlier racing aircraft mentioned in clue #1 set a transatlantic speed record.
12. The transatlantic speed record in clue # 11 was set in 1936.
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Old 09-17-2019, 09:50 AM
  #17523  
Ernie P.
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Originally Posted by JohnnyS View Post
Not the P-35, no.

New Clue!

1. Built by an American manufacturer.
2. Developed from an earlier racing aircraft.
3. Fewer than 50 built.
4. Only used in the USA as a training aid.
5. It was originally designed for export to a particular country, but was never delivered. It did wind up being exported to two other countries where it served briefly.
6. Crew of two.
7. 14 cylinder radial engine.
8. The first batch built was painted in Air France livery to try to get around an export prohibition.
9. One of the countries that operated this aircraft was China.
10. And the other country that operated this aircraft was Mexico.
11. The earlier racing aircraft mentioned in clue #1 set a transatlantic speed record.
12. The transatlantic speed record in clue # 11 was set in 1936.
Well, JohnnyS; that should narrow it down to a precious few. To me, clue (8) was a giveaway. Thanks; Ernie P.
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Old 09-17-2019, 10:49 AM
  #17524  
FlyerInOKC
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Weird I don't recall a transatlantic speed record set in 1936?!
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Old 09-17-2019, 12:37 PM
  #17525  
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Yeah, the report of the record may be sketchy. It was mentioned in the Wikipedia entry for the aircraft.

New Clue!

1. Built by an American manufacturer.
2. Developed from an earlier racing aircraft.
3. Fewer than 50 built.
4. Only used in the USA as a training aid.
5. It was originally designed for export to a particular country, but was never delivered. It did wind up being exported to two other countries where it served briefly.
6. Crew of two.
7. 14 cylinder radial engine.
8. The first batch built was painted in Air France livery to try to get around an export prohibition.
9. One of the countries that operated this aircraft was China.
10. And the other country that operated this aircraft was Mexico.
11. The earlier racing aircraft mentioned in clue #1 set a transatlantic speed record.
12. The transatlantic speed record in clue # 11 was set in 1936.
13. Wingspan was just over 46 feet.
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