Notices
RC Warbirds and Warplanes Discuss rc warbirds and warplanes in this forum.

Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

Old 09-17-2019, 01:20 PM
  #17526  
Ernie P.
My Feedback: (3)
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bealeton, VA
Posts: 5,487
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Originally Posted by FlyerInOKC View Post
Weird I don't recall a transatlantic speed record set in 1936?!
And yet there are reports of the record being set. There are more than a few "head scratcher" things about this particular aircraft (as opposed to this particular aircraft type), but JohnnyS is correct. One interesting thing.... but I'll leave that for JohnnyS to divulge, should he so choose. It is an interesting military aircraft. Thanks; Ernie P.
Ernie P. is online now  
Old 09-17-2019, 03:25 PM
  #17527  
Ernie P.
My Feedback: (3)
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bealeton, VA
Posts: 5,487
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

JohnnyS; you have a PM. Thanks; Ernie P.
Ernie P. is online now  
Old 09-18-2019, 04:42 AM
  #17528  
JohnnyS
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Toronto, ON, CANADA
Posts: 710
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

New Clue!

1. Built by an American manufacturer.
2. Developed from an earlier racing aircraft.
3. Fewer than 50 built.
4. Only used in the USA as a training aid.
5. It was originally designed for export to a particular country, but was never delivered. It did wind up being exported to two other countries where it served briefly.
6. Crew of two.
7. 14 cylinder radial engine.
8. The first batch built was painted in Air France livery to try to get around an export prohibition.
9. One of the countries that operated this aircraft was China.
10. And the other country that operated this aircraft was Mexico.
11. The earlier racing aircraft mentioned in clue #1 set a transatlantic speed record.
12. The transatlantic speed record in clue # 11 was set in 1936.
13. Wingspan was just over 46 feet.
14. Designer was Albert W. Mooney.
JohnnyS is online now  
Old 09-18-2019, 05:14 AM
  #17529  
FlyerInOKC
My Feedback: (6)
 
FlyerInOKC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Oklahoma City, OK
Posts: 10,354
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

All most sounds like the Bellanca Aircruiser but the specs are all wrong.
FlyerInOKC is online now  
Old 09-18-2019, 06:11 AM
  #17530  
JohnnyS
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Toronto, ON, CANADA
Posts: 710
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

OK, FlyerInOKC, that earns a new clue!

1. Built by an American manufacturer.
2. Developed from an earlier racing aircraft.
3. Fewer than 50 built.
4. Only used in the USA as a training aid.
5. It was originally designed for export to a particular country, but was never delivered. It did wind up being exported to two other countries where it served briefly.
6. Crew of two.
7. 14 cylinder radial engine.
8. The first batch built was painted in Air France livery to try to get around an export prohibition.
9. One of the countries that operated this aircraft was China.
10. And the other country that operated this aircraft was Mexico.
11. The earlier racing aircraft mentioned in clue #1 set a transatlantic speed record.
12. The transatlantic speed record in clue # 11 was set in 1936.
13. Wingspan was just over 46 feet.
14. Designer was Albert W. Mooney.
15. Bellanca made more than one aircraft, eh?
JohnnyS is online now  
Old 09-19-2019, 01:43 PM
  #17531  
JohnnyS
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Toronto, ON, CANADA
Posts: 710
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

New clue!

1. Built by an American manufacturer.
2. Developed from an earlier racing aircraft.
3. Fewer than 50 built.
4. Only used in the USA as a training aid.
5. It was originally designed for export to a particular country, but was never delivered. It did wind up being exported to two other countries where it served briefly.
6. Crew of two.
7. 14 cylinder radial engine.
8. The first batch built was painted in Air France livery to try to get around an export prohibition.
9. One of the countries that operated this aircraft was China.
10. And the other country that operated this aircraft was Mexico.
11. The earlier racing aircraft mentioned in clue #1 set a transatlantic speed record.
12. The transatlantic speed record in clue # 11 was set in 1936.
13. Wingspan was just over 46 feet.
14. Designer was Albert W. Mooney.
15. Bellanca made more than one aircraft, eh?
16. The export prohibition that caused the problems delivering the aircraft was the US export prohibition on arms to Spain during the Spanish civil war.
JohnnyS is online now  
Old 09-20-2019, 05:25 AM
  #17532  
JohnnyS
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Toronto, ON, CANADA
Posts: 710
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

New clue!

1. Built by an American manufacturer.
2. Developed from an earlier racing aircraft.
3. Fewer than 50 built.
4. Only used in the USA as a training aid.
5. It was originally designed for export to a particular country, but was never delivered. It did wind up being exported to two other countries where it served briefly.
6. Crew of two.
7. 14 cylinder radial engine.
8. The first batch built was painted in Air France livery to try to get around an export prohibition.
9. One of the countries that operated this aircraft was China.
10. And the other country that operated this aircraft was Mexico.
11. The earlier racing aircraft mentioned in clue #1 set a transatlantic speed record.
12. The transatlantic speed record in clue # 11 was set in 1936.
13. Wingspan was just over 46 feet.
14. Designer was Albert W. Mooney.
15. Bellanca made more than one aircraft, eh?
16. The export prohibition that caused the problems delivering the aircraft was the US export prohibition on arms to Spain during the Spanish civil war.
17. Maximum speed was 280 mph.
JohnnyS is online now  
Old 09-20-2019, 03:51 PM
  #17533  
JohnnyS
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Toronto, ON, CANADA
Posts: 710
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Ernie,

At this point I don't think anyone else is trying to solve this puzzle. Please go ahead and solve it if you like.
JohnnyS is online now  
Old 09-20-2019, 05:39 PM
  #17534  
Hydro Junkie
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Marysville, WA
Posts: 7,831
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

I probably could EXCEPT I wouldn't be able to run a quiz for at least a couple of weeks due to other commitments so I've kind of been forced to not take an active part in the thread for a bit.
Hydro Junkie is online now  
Old 09-20-2019, 07:06 PM
  #17535  
Ernie P.
My Feedback: (3)
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bealeton, VA
Posts: 5,487
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Originally Posted by JohnnyS View Post
Ernie,

At this point I don't think anyone else is trying to solve this puzzle. Please go ahead and solve it if you like.
Sir; this is a recurring problem. Our numbers have simply shrunk to the point we're on a short rotation. We had a lot more participants when we could still do the "first; fastest; highest; whatever" planes. But since we entered the harder to solve questions, not so many people even try. However, as long as we're having fun, let's move forward. Thanks; Ernie P.


Answer: The Bellanca 28-90 Flash

The Bellanca 28-90 Flash was an American military aircraft derived from an earlier air racer developed in the 1930s for export to Spain to take part in the Spanish Civil War. Although it never reached Spain, the order was diverted to China where the aircraft briefly saw service. Later, a new batch destined for Spain ended up in Mexico.
Design and development

The Bellanca 28-70 air racer built by Giuseppe Mario Bellanca for the 1934 MacRobertson Race was shipped to Great Britain but was unable to participate in the race due to a lack of time to adequately prepare the aircraft. It went back to the USA to finish its tests, but was badly damaged in a landing accident. In 1936 the aircraft was rebuilt with a 900 hp P&W "Twin Wasp" and redesignated the 28-90. After being purchased by British long-distance air racer James Mollison, he renamed the aircraft Dorothy after actress friend Dorothy Ward. Mollison used the Bellanca 28-90 for a new transatlantic speed record on 29–30 October 1936 and later in the year made an attempt to set a long-distance London-Cape Town record that was aborted. In 1937 Mollison flew to Madrid and sold the aircraft to the Republican government in Spain.
Operational history

The Spanish Republican government, in desperate need of modern military aircraft, placed an order for 20 aircraft in 1936 through an "arms length" deal with Air France. In order to circumvent US government export restrictions in the Neutrality Acts aimed at stopping exports to combatants in Europe, the Bellanca 28-90s were marked with spurious Air France livery and declared by Bellanca to be mailplanes. The truth was discovered, however, and export permission was denied. Nevertheless, the Chinese government managed to secure permission to buy the aircraft and they were shipped there instead. Fitted with bomb racks and machine guns mounted in the fuselage at Hangkow, this first batch of machines saw brief service, although seven of them were destroyed on the ground in Japanese raids without having seen combat. The remainder were destroyed in testing.

Undaunted, the Spanish government tried again, ordering 22 examples as "trainers" with full payment in advance, with the aircraft this time being exported to a Greek civil reservist flying school. Once again, however, the truth was found out and export permission denied. They were eventually successfully purchased for export to Mexico, but with their true destination again Spain. However, before the aircraft could be supplied, the Spanish Civil War was over.

After languishing for over a year in a warehouse in Veracruz, they were indeed purchased by the Mexican Air Force, with which they served from 1939 to 1940 until grounded due to safety concerns.
In 1946, the surviving 19 airframes were acquired by the Charles E. Babb Company and shipped to Glendale, California. A final sale of the Bellancas still in packing crates was made to the US Navy where the aircraft were distributed to US Navy Technical Centers as training aids.
Specifications



General characteristicsCrew: two, pilot and observer Length: 26 ft 6 in (8.08 m) Wingspan: 46 ft 2 in (14.08 m) Wing area: 279 ft2 (25.9 m2) Gross weight: 7,849 lb (3,560 kg) Powerplant: 1 ◊ Pratt & Whitney R-1830, 960 hp (716 kW)

Performance

Maximum speed: 280 mph (450 km/h) Range: 800 miles (1,290 km) Service ceiling: 30,500 ft (9,300 m) Rate of climb: 2,800 ft/min (14.2 m/s)
Ernie P. is online now  
Old 09-20-2019, 07:23 PM
  #17536  
FlyerInOKC
My Feedback: (6)
 
FlyerInOKC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Oklahoma City, OK
Posts: 10,354
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Strange looking bird!
FlyerInOKC is online now  
Old 09-21-2019, 04:42 AM
  #17537  
N1EDM
My Feedback: (2)
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Brockton, MA
Posts: 4,197
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

For the record, I will admit to being a Lurker on this thread. But my knowledge of aircraft could never compete with the aircraft that you all refer to.

That being said, I think that I (and, I suspect, a lot of other people out there) am still learning a lot from the clues and nuances that you discuss here. I didn't want you to think that you only had a small audience here.

I could never complete on your level, but still enjoy the thread.

Bob
N1EDM is offline  
Old 09-21-2019, 05:48 AM
  #17538  
CF105
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 113
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Bear in mind itís still flying season. Once the weather turns some of us will have more of an online presence.
CF105 is offline  
Old 09-21-2019, 09:08 AM
  #17539  
Hydro Junkie
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Marysville, WA
Posts: 7,831
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Bob, it's not a matter of how much you do or don't know. Googling and source surfing if part of the fun. I can't say I'm a WWI aircraft expert or know who flew or designed what, I just have fun trying to find the information and, if I'm wrong, NOBODY CARES!!!!!!!!!!
For anyone else that lurks, feel free to give a guess at what the plane/person is in a quiz. Hell, I just learned that the guy who started Mooney Aircraft was a designer for Bellanca before he started his own company. I didn't have any idea that Albert Mooney had been involved with aviation anywhere close to that long but, then again, he did have several very successful designs with his own company after WWII had ended.
Hydro Junkie is online now  
Old 09-21-2019, 03:41 PM
  #17540  
Ernie P.
My Feedback: (3)
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bealeton, VA
Posts: 5,487
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Originally Posted by CF105 View Post
Bear in mind itís still flying season. Once the weather turns some of us will have more of an online presence.
And that's why I'm slow in getting this posted. We had one of our two annual Float Fly events (spring and fall) today. I flew five times, got the airplane back in one piece and I can fly it again without doing anything beyond charging the battery. Here we go again. I hope you all enjoy this one. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. Single seat fighter.

2. A relatively short service life.

3. Although that wasnít uncommon during the period.
Ernie P. is online now  
Old 09-21-2019, 03:52 PM
  #17541  
Hydro Junkie
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Marysville, WA
Posts: 7,831
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Lets try this, though I'd bet I'm wrong. What about the Grumman F2F?
Hydro Junkie is online now  
Old 09-21-2019, 07:08 PM
  #17542  
FlyerInOKC
My Feedback: (6)
 
FlyerInOKC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Oklahoma City, OK
Posts: 10,354
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

I'll throw out the Fokker Eindecker!
FlyerInOKC is online now  
Old 09-21-2019, 07:40 PM
  #17543  
Ernie P.
My Feedback: (3)
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bealeton, VA
Posts: 5,487
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

No correct answers thus far. However, I'll award two new clues to reward the attempts. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. Single seat fighter.

2. A relatively short service life.

3. Although that wasn’t uncommon during the period.

4. And a foreign government continued to operate the type for another ten years after it was retired by the country that developed it.

5. The first aircraft of its type for the service that operated it.
Ernie P. is online now  
Old 09-21-2019, 07:45 PM
  #17544  
Ernie P.
My Feedback: (3)
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bealeton, VA
Posts: 5,487
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Originally Posted by N1EDM View Post
For the record, I will admit to being a Lurker on this thread. But my knowledge of aircraft could never compete with the aircraft that you all refer to.

That being said, I think that I (and, I suspect, a lot of other people out there) am still learning a lot from the clues and nuances that you discuss here. I didn't want you to think that you only had a small audience here.

I could never complete on your level, but still enjoy the thread.

Bob
Bob; you're welcome to lurk all you want. However, I find I learn more when I'm researching an aircraft I want as the subject of one of my questions. It simply isn't a question of what you know; but more a question of what you can learn. No matter what you do, we're happy to have you with us. Thanks; Ernie P.
Ernie P. is online now  
Old 09-22-2019, 02:37 AM
  #17545  
Ernie P.
My Feedback: (3)
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bealeton, VA
Posts: 5,487
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. Single seat fighter.

2. A relatively short service life.

3. Although that wasn’t uncommon during the period.

4. And a foreign government continued to operate the type for another ten years after it was retired by the country that developed it.

5. The first aircraft of its type for the service that operated it.

6. It went into service more than five years after its first flight.
Ernie P. is online now  
Old 09-22-2019, 08:26 AM
  #17546  
Ernie P.
My Feedback: (3)
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bealeton, VA
Posts: 5,487
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Afternoon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. Single seat fighter.

2. A relatively short service life.

3. Although that wasn’t uncommon during the period.

4. And a foreign government continued to operate the type for another ten years after it was retired by the country that developed it.

5. The first aircraft of its type for the service that operated it.

6. It went into service more than five years after its first flight.

7. This was due to a number of issues; a major one being handling difficulties.
Ernie P. is online now  
Old 09-23-2019, 02:10 AM
  #17547  
Ernie P.
My Feedback: (3)
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bealeton, VA
Posts: 5,487
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. Single seat fighter.

2. A relatively short service life.

3. Although that wasn’t uncommon during the period.

4. And a foreign government continued to operate the type for another ten years after it was retired by the country that developed it.

5. The first aircraft of its type for the service that operated it.

6. It went into service more than five years after its first flight.

7. This was due to a number of issues; a major one being handling difficulties.

8. After its long gestation period, it served for only three years in front line service.
Ernie P. is online now  
Old 09-23-2019, 04:28 AM
  #17548  
Hydro Junkie
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Marysville, WA
Posts: 7,831
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

F-80 Shooting Star
Hydro Junkie is online now  
Old 09-23-2019, 04:42 AM
  #17549  
FlyerInOKC
My Feedback: (6)
 
FlyerInOKC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Oklahoma City, OK
Posts: 10,354
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Originally Posted by Hydro Junkie View Post
F-80 Shooting Star
Good guess, I'm going with the Republic F-84 Thunderjet the other straight line wing fighter of the post war era.
FlyerInOKC is online now  
Old 09-23-2019, 07:56 AM
  #17550  
Ernie P.
My Feedback: (3)
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bealeton, VA
Posts: 5,487
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

No correct answers thus far, but I'll toss in a couple of extra clues as well as the regularly scheduled afternoon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. Single seat fighter.

2. A relatively short service life.

3. Although that wasn’t uncommon during the period.

4. And a foreign government continued to operate the type for another ten years after it was retired by the country that developed it.

5. The first aircraft of its type for the service that operated it.

6. It went into service more than five years after its first flight.

7. This was due to a number of issues; a major one being handling difficulties.

8. After its long gestation period, it served for only three years in front line service.

9. Designed and produced by a famous manufacturer.

10. The fuselage was a new design.

11. Although the wings were a design originally intended for an earlier aircraft.
Ernie P. is online now  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.