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Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

Old 10-01-2019, 01:01 PM
  #17601  
Ernie P.
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Neither the Yak 3 nor the F-86, but here's a couple of bonus clues to assist you in your searches. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This airplane was produced in large numbers.

2. Numbers that might have been much greater; but it was replaced, or supplanted by, a new variant of itself.

3. Used in multiple roles.

4. One of which was as an escort fighter.

5. In fact, the design was based upon an earlier, successful fighter produced by the same company.

6. Less than five months elapsed between the requirement for a new aircraft being released and the aircraft’s first flight.

7. Less than three months later, the aircraft had been tested, approved, ordered and was being delivered to field units.

8. This aircraft was considered by enemy aircrew to be very dangerous.

9. Its maneuverability and rate of climb allowed it to take on enemy fighters on at least even terms.

10. Single Engine.
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Old 10-01-2019, 08:29 PM
  #17602  
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How about the A6M Zero-sen
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Old 10-02-2019, 01:58 AM
  #17603  
Ernie P.
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Not the Zero, Sparky; but here's a regularly scheduled morning clue and a bonus clue to reward your efforts and aid your search. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This airplane was produced in large numbers.

2. Numbers that might have been much greater; but it was replaced, or supplanted by, a new variant of itself.

3. Used in multiple roles.

4. One of which was as an escort fighter.

5. In fact, the design was based upon an earlier, successful fighter produced by the same company.

6. Less than five months elapsed between the requirement for a new aircraft being released and the aircraft’s first flight.

7. Less than three months later, the aircraft had been tested, approved, ordered and was being delivered to field units.

8. This aircraft was considered by enemy aircrew to be very dangerous.

9. Its maneuverability and rate of climb allowed it to take on enemy fighters on at least even terms.

10. Single Engine.

11. Two crew members.

12. Although it carried a crew of two, it could easily contend with any single seat fighter flown by the enemy.
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Old 10-02-2019, 08:25 AM
  #17604  
Ernie P.
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Afternoon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This airplane was produced in large numbers.

2. Numbers that might have been much greater; but it was replaced, or supplanted by, a new variant of itself.

3. Used in multiple roles.

4. One of which was as an escort fighter.

5. In fact, the design was based upon an earlier, successful fighter produced by the same company.

6. Less than five months elapsed between the requirement for a new aircraft being released and the aircraft’s first flight.

7. Less than three months later, the aircraft had been tested, approved, ordered and was being delivered to field units.

8. This aircraft was considered by enemy aircrew to be very dangerous.

9. Its maneuverability and rate of climb allowed it to take on enemy fighters on at least even terms.

10. Single Engine.

11. Two crew members.

12. Although it carried a crew of two, it could easily contend with any single seat fighter flown by the enemy.

13. This was, at least in part, due to its light construction.
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Old 10-02-2019, 04:19 PM
  #17605  
Ernie P.
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Evening clue. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This airplane was produced in large numbers.

2. Numbers that might have been much greater; but it was replaced, or supplanted by, a new variant of itself.

3. Used in multiple roles.

4. One of which was as an escort fighter.

5. In fact, the design was based upon an earlier, successful fighter produced by the same company.

6. Less than five months elapsed between the requirement for a new aircraft being released and the aircraft’s first flight.

7. Less than three months later, the aircraft had been tested, approved, ordered and was being delivered to field units.

8. This aircraft was considered by enemy aircrew to be very dangerous.

9. Its maneuverability and rate of climb allowed it to take on enemy fighters on at least even terms.

10. Single Engine.

11. Two crew members.

12. Although it carried a crew of two, it could easily contend with any single seat fighter flown by the enemy.

13. This was, at least in part, due to its light construction.

14. And it came to be used heavily as a ground attack aircraft.
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Old 10-03-2019, 02:16 AM
  #17606  
Ernie P.
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Morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This airplane was produced in large numbers.

2. Numbers that might have been much greater; but it was replaced, or supplanted by, a new variant of itself.

3. Used in multiple roles.

4. One of which was as an escort fighter.

5. In fact, the design was based upon an earlier, successful fighter produced by the same company.

6. Less than five months elapsed between the requirement for a new aircraft being released and the aircraft’s first flight.

7. Less than three months later, the aircraft had been tested, approved, ordered and was being delivered to field units.

8. This aircraft was considered by enemy aircrew to be very dangerous.

9. Its maneuverability and rate of climb allowed it to take on enemy fighters on at least even terms.

10. Single Engine.

11. Two crew members.

12. Although it carried a crew of two, it could easily contend with any single seat fighter flown by the enemy.

13. This was, at least in part, due to its light construction.

14. And it came to be used heavily as a ground attack aircraft.

15. It was noted as being very useful in aiding friendly units on the attack.
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Old 10-03-2019, 12:51 PM
  #17607  
Ernie P.
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Afternoon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This airplane was produced in large numbers.

2. Numbers that might have been much greater; but it was replaced, or supplanted by, a new variant of itself.

3. Used in multiple roles.

4. One of which was as an escort fighter.

5. In fact, the design was based upon an earlier, successful fighter produced by the same company.

6. Less than five months elapsed between the requirement for a new aircraft being released and the aircraft’s first flight.

7. Less than three months later, the aircraft had been tested, approved, ordered and was being delivered to field units.

8. This aircraft was considered by enemy aircrew to be very dangerous.

9. Its maneuverability and rate of climb allowed it to take on enemy fighters on at least even terms.

10. Single Engine.

11. Two crew members.

12. Although it carried a crew of two, it could easily contend with any single seat fighter flown by the enemy.

13. This was, at least in part, due to its light construction.

14. And it came to be used heavily as a ground attack aircraft.

15. It was noted as being very useful in aiding friendly units on the attack.

16. And breaking up counterattacks by enemy units.
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Old 10-03-2019, 02:47 PM
  #17608  
Ernie P.
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Evening clue. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This airplane was produced in large numbers.

2. Numbers that might have been much greater; but it was replaced, or supplanted by, a new variant of itself.

3. Used in multiple roles.

4. One of which was as an escort fighter.

5. In fact, the design was based upon an earlier, successful fighter produced by the same company.

6. Less than five months elapsed between the requirement for a new aircraft being released and the aircraft’s first flight.

7. Less than three months later, the aircraft had been tested, approved, ordered and was being delivered to field units.

8. This aircraft was considered by enemy aircrew to be very dangerous.

9. Its maneuverability and rate of climb allowed it to take on enemy fighters on at least even terms.

10. Single Engine.

11. Two crew members.

12. Although it carried a crew of two, it could easily contend with any single seat fighter flown by the enemy.

13. This was, at least in part, due to its light construction.

14. And it came to be used heavily as a ground attack aircraft.

15. It was noted as being very useful in aiding friendly units on the attack.

16. And breaking up counterattacks by enemy units.

17. This was an “all wood” aircraft.
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Old 10-04-2019, 01:58 AM
  #17609  
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Morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This airplane was produced in large numbers.

2. Numbers that might have been much greater; but it was replaced, or supplanted by, a new variant of itself.

3. Used in multiple roles.

4. One of which was as an escort fighter.

5. In fact, the design was based upon an earlier, successful fighter produced by the same company.

6. Less than five months elapsed between the requirement for a new aircraft being released and the aircraft’s first flight.

7. Less than three months later, the aircraft had been tested, approved, ordered and was being delivered to field units.

8. This aircraft was considered by enemy aircrew to be very dangerous.

9. Its maneuverability and rate of climb allowed it to take on enemy fighters on at least even terms.

10. Single Engine.

11. Two crew members.

12. Although it carried a crew of two, it could easily contend with any single seat fighter flown by the enemy.

13. This was, at least in part, due to its light construction.

14. And it came to be used heavily as a ground attack aircraft.

15. It was noted as being very useful in aiding friendly units on the attack.

16. And breaking up counterattacks by enemy units.

17. This was an “all wood” aircraft.

18. Plywood paneling was used.
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Old 10-04-2019, 04:39 AM
  #17610  
FlyerInOKC
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I keep coming up with ideas but they never cover all the clues!
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Old 10-04-2019, 10:14 AM
  #17611  
Ernie P.
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Originally Posted by FlyerInOKC View Post
I keep coming up with ideas but they never cover all the clues!
Keep plugging away; you'll figure it out! In the interim, here's an afternoon clue to help you along. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This airplane was produced in large numbers.

2. Numbers that might have been much greater; but it was replaced, or supplanted by, a new variant of itself.

3. Used in multiple roles.

4. One of which was as an escort fighter.

5. In fact, the design was based upon an earlier, successful fighter produced by the same company.

6. Less than five months elapsed between the requirement for a new aircraft being released and the aircraft’s first flight.

7. Less than three months later, the aircraft had been tested, approved, ordered and was being delivered to field units.

8. This aircraft was considered by enemy aircrew to be very dangerous.

9. Its maneuverability and rate of climb allowed it to take on enemy fighters on at least even terms.

10. Single Engine.

11. Two crew members.

12. Although it carried a crew of two, it could easily contend with any single seat fighter flown by the enemy.

13. This was, at least in part, due to its light construction.

14. And it came to be used heavily as a ground attack aircraft.

15. It was noted as being very useful in aiding friendly units on the attack.

16. And breaking up counterattacks by enemy units.

17. This was an “all wood” aircraft.

18. Plywood paneling was used.

19. Both crew members sat in the same cockpit.
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Old 10-04-2019, 01:28 PM
  #17612  
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DH vampire
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Old 10-04-2019, 07:08 PM
  #17613  
Ernie P.
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Originally Posted by j pickul View Post
DH vampire
Sir; not the Vampire. But here's a bonus clue, plus the normal evening clue, to aid your search. Please try again. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This airplane was produced in large numbers.

2. Numbers that might have been much greater; but it was replaced, or supplanted by, a new variant of itself.

3. Used in multiple roles.

4. One of which was as an escort fighter.

5. In fact, the design was based upon an earlier, successful fighter produced by the same company.

6. Less than five months elapsed between the requirement for a new aircraft being released and the aircraft’s first flight.

7. Less than three months later, the aircraft had been tested, approved, ordered and was being delivered to field units.

8. This aircraft was considered by enemy aircrew to be very dangerous.

9. Its maneuverability and rate of climb allowed it to take on enemy fighters on at least even terms.

10. Single Engine.

11. Two crew members.

12. Although it carried a crew of two, it could easily contend with any single seat fighter flown by the enemy.

13. This was, at least in part, due to its light construction.

14. And it came to be used heavily as a ground attack aircraft.

15. It was noted as being very useful in aiding friendly units on the attack.

16. And breaking up counterattacks by enemy units.

17. This was an “all wood” aircraft.

18. Plywood paneling was used.

19. Both crew members sat in the same cockpit.

20. Which aided communication between the crew.

21. The upper wing was swept.
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Old 10-05-2019, 02:23 AM
  #17614  
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Today's clue. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This airplane was produced in large numbers.

2. Numbers that might have been much greater; but it was replaced, or supplanted by, a new variant of itself.

3. Used in multiple roles.

4. One of which was as an escort fighter.

5. In fact, the design was based upon an earlier, successful fighter produced by the same company.

6. Less than five months elapsed between the requirement for a new aircraft being released and the aircraft’s first flight.

7. Less than three months later, the aircraft had been tested, approved, ordered and was being delivered to field units.

8. This aircraft was considered by enemy aircrew to be very dangerous.

9. Its maneuverability and rate of climb allowed it to take on enemy fighters on at least even terms.

10. Single Engine.

11. Two crew members.

12. Although it carried a crew of two, it could easily contend with any single seat fighter flown by the enemy.

13. This was, at least in part, due to its light construction.

14. And it came to be used heavily as a ground attack aircraft.

15. It was noted as being very useful in aiding friendly units on the attack.

16. And breaking up counterattacks by enemy units.

17. This was an “all wood” aircraft.

18. Plywood paneling was used.

19. Both crew members sat in the same cockpit.

20. Which aided communication between the crew.

21. The upper wing was swept.

22. A good field of fire for the observer.
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Old 10-05-2019, 04:59 AM
  #17615  
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How about the Halberstadt CL.II?
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Old 10-05-2019, 04:40 PM
  #17616  
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Originally Posted by Top_Gunn View Post
How about the Halberstadt CL.II?
Congratulations, Al; you nailed it! And you are now up. What was the giveaway? The Halberstadt was a mainstay within the German Air Force in the last two years of WWI. It was deadly; being a match for almost any British of French aircraft aligned against it. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This airplane was produced in large numbers.

2. Numbers that might have been much greater; but it was replaced, or supplanted by, a new variant of itself.

3. Used in multiple roles.

4. One of which was as an escort fighter.

5. In fact, the design was based upon an earlier, successful fighter produced by the same company.

6. Less than five months elapsed between the requirement for a new aircraft being released and the aircraft’s first flight.

7. Less than three months later, the aircraft had been tested, approved, ordered and was being delivered to field units.

8. This aircraft was considered by enemy aircrew to be very dangerous.

9. Its maneuverability and rate of climb allowed it to take on enemy fighters on at least even terms.

10. Single Engine.

11. Two crew members.

12. Although it carried a crew of two, it could easily contend with any single seat fighter flown by the enemy.

13. This was, at least in part, due to its light construction.

14. And it came to be used heavily as a ground attack aircraft.

15. It was noted as being very useful in aiding friendly units on the attack.

16. And breaking up counterattacks by enemy units.

17. This was an “all wood” aircraft.

18. Plywood paneling was used.

19. Both crew members sat in the same cockpit.

20. Which aided communication between the crew.

21. The upper wing was swept.

22. A good field of fire for the observer.

23. A tray to hold grenades was fitted to the fuselage.

24. And bombs were fitted, as well.

25. A wireless radio was often fitted; and the aircraft was purpose built to accommodate the fitting.

26. The generator for the radio was driven by the engine.

27. And the generator could power heated flight suits, as well.

28. Several hundred aircraft were built by the designing firm.

29. And a few hundred by another firm.

30. The design was immediately very successful and served until the conflict ended.

31. When utilized in a ground support role, it was also very successful.

32. And was used in a number of well-known battles, both offensively and defensively.

33. In fact, it was so successful ground attack became its primary role.

34. One surviving aircraft exists.

35. Which was used by the head of its air service.

36. Fabric covered single bay wings were used.

37. Only two variants were produced; the main difference being the engine utilized.

38. After the war, it served with two foreign nations.





Answer: The Halberstadt CL.II



The Halberstadt CL.II was a German two-seat escort fighter/ground attack aircraft of World War I. It served in large numbers with the German Luftstreitkräfte (Imperial German Army Air Service) in 1917-18.

Development and design

Early in 1917, Idflieg, the German Army Inspectorate of Flying Troops, developed a requirement for a new type of two-seat aircraft, smaller than the existing C-type aircraft. This type, to be known as CL-type (Light C type) aircraft, were to be used to equip Schutzstaffeln (Protection flights) to escort reconnaissance aircraft. To meet this requirement, Halberstadt developed an aircraft based on its earlier, unsuccessful Halberstadt D.IV single-seat fighter. Originally designated the Halberstadt C.II, it was redesignated the Halberstadt CL.II when the CL designation was applied. The CL.II was a single-engined biplane, with an all-wooden structure. The fuselage was covered with thin plywood panelling and housed the crew of two in a single cockpit, with the observer's 7.92 mm (.312 in) machine gun being mounted on an elevated gun ring, giving a good field of fire, allowing downwards fire at targets on the ground. A tray large enough to hold ten stick grenades was attached to the left side of the fuselage. The single-bay wings were fabric-covered, with a swept upper wing. The aircraft had provisions for a wireless radio. When needed the radio and antenna could be installed in the observer's cockpit and a generator, that would also supply current for heated flight suits, could easily be installed. The generator was directly driven by a pulley on the engine and mounted on the left side with a tear drop shaped fairing covering it. With the generator removed, a flat panel would be fitted instead. The CL.II passed its Typenprüfung (type-test) on 7 May 1917, which resulted in production orders being placed. Halberstadt built 700 CL.IIs by the time production shifted to the improved CL.IV in mid-1918. A further 200 CL.II aircraft were built in 1918 by the Bayerische Flugzeug-Werke (BFW).

Operational history

The CL.II entered service in August 1917, and proved extremely successful, its excellent manoeuvrability, rate of climb and good field of fire for its armament allowing it to match opposing single-seat fighters. It also proved to be well suited to close-support, which became the primary role of the CL-type aircraft, the units operating them being re-designated Schlachtstaffeln (Battle flights). Ground support by the Schlachtstaffeln proved very effective, being used both in support of German attacks and to disrupt enemy attacks. An early example of the successful use of CL type aircraft in the ground attack role was during the German counterattack on 30 November 1917 during the Battle of Cambrai, where they were a major factor in the German performance. The success of the German tactics at Cambrai, including the use of close air support, resulted in the Germans assembling large numbers of CL-types in support of the Spring Offensive in March 1918, with 38 Schlachtstaffeln (equipped with the CL.II, CL.IV and the Hannover CL.III) available, of which 27 were deployed against the British forces during the initial attack Operation Michael The CL.II continued in service until the end of the War.

Survivors

The only existing Halberstadt CL.II is exhibited in the Polish Aviation Museum in Kraków. This unique plane served as the personal aircraft of the Commander of Luftstreitkräfte general Ernst von Hoeppner. CL.II 15459-17 of General von Hoeppner

Variants

CL.IIMain production type, powered by Mercedes D.III engine of 110 kW (150 hp). CL.IIaCL.II fitted with BMW IIIa engine. Few produced for evaluation purposes.

Operators

German Empire · Luftstreitkräfte

Lithuania (postwar) · Lithuanian Air Force

Poland (postwar) · Polskie Siły Powietrzne

Specifications (CL.II)

Data from German Aircraft of the First World War.

General characteristics· · Crew: 2 · · Length: 7.3 m (23 ft 11 in) · · Wingspan: 10.77 m (35 ft 4 in) · · Height: 2.75 m (9 ft 0 in) · · Wing area: 27.5 m2 (296 sq ft) · · Empty weight: 773 kg (1,704 lb) · · Gross weight: 1,133 kg (2,498 lb) · · Powerplant: 1 × Mercedes D.III 6-cylinder water-cooled in-line piston engine, 120 kW (160 hp)



Performance· · Maximum speed: 165 km/h (103 mph, 89 kn) at 5,000 m (16,000 ft) · · Endurance: 3 hours · · Service ceiling: 5,090 m (16,700 ft) [9] · · Time to altitude: 1,000 m (3,300 ft) in 5 minutes; 5,000 m (16,000 ft) in 39.5 minutes · · Wing loading: 41.2 kg/m2 (8.4 lb/sq ft) · · Power/mass: 0.11 kW/kg (0.06 hp/lb)

Armament· · Guns: · · 1 × 7.92 mm (0.312 in) LMG 08/15 "Spandau" machine gun, synchronized · · 1 × 7.92 mm (0.312 in) Parabellum MG14 machine gun, on ring mount for observer · · · Bombs: · · 10 x stick grenades · · Up to 5 × 10 kg (22 lb) Wurfgranaten 15 trench mortar fragmentation bombs
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Old 10-06-2019, 05:19 AM
  #17617  
Top_Gunn
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There wasn't any one giveaway clue. Like about everybody else who guessed, I started out looking at WWII and later airplanes, perhaps because of the "escort fighter" clue (not a term that often comes up in first world war talk, though of course they did use them). After it began to seem likely that it was a WWI airplane, the most useful clues for me were the ones about a crew of two in one cockpit and the swept upper wing.

Here we go again.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Designed and manufactured by a company which, along with the first of its many successors, is mainly known for producing military aircraft, This one, however, began as a four-place civilian airplane.

2. It has been used in quite a few war movies, in which it is usually disguised as a fighter.

3. Both when it was a civilian airplane and during its later use by the armed forces of quite a few countries, the rear seats were often removed. So if you think of it as a two-seater, you are not alone.
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Old 10-06-2019, 09:23 AM
  #17618  
Ernie P.
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Originally Posted by Top_Gunn View Post
There wasn't any one giveaway clue. Like about everybody else who guessed, I started out looking at WWII and later airplanes, perhaps because of the "escort fighter" clue (not a term that often comes up in first world war talk, though of course they did use them). After it began to seem likely that it was a WWI airplane, the most useful clues for me were the ones about a crew of two in one cockpit and the swept upper wing.

Here we go again.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Designed and manufactured by a company which, along with the first of its many successors, is mainly known for producing military aircraft, This one, however, began as a four-place civilian airplane.

2. It has been used in quite a few war movies, in which it is usually disguised as a fighter.

3. Both when it was a civilian airplane and during its later use by the armed forces of quite a few countries, the rear seats were often removed. So if you think of it as a two-seater, you are not alone.
Al; I've been up too much recently, but I have trouble resisting the long shots. I think you're expecting this answer, so I doubt it's correct. But how about the Bf-108 or its French version, the Nord Pingouin? Thanks; Ernie P.


The Messerschmitt Bf 108 Taifun was a German single-engine sport and touring aircraft, developed by Bayerische Flugzeugwerke in the 1930s. The Bf 108 was of all-metal construction.

Design and development

Originally designated the M 37, the aircraft was designed as a four-seat sports/recreation aircraft for competition in the 4th Challenge International de Tourisme (1934).[2]
[3]
The M 37 prototype flew first in spring 1934, powered by a 250 PS (247 hp, 184 kW) Hirth HM 8U 8.0 litre displacement, air-cooled inverted-V8 engine, which drove a three-blade propeller. Although it was outperformed by several other aircraft in the competition, the M 37's overall performance marked it as a popular choice for record flights. Particular among these traits was its low fuel consumption rate, good handling, and superb takeoff and landing characteristics. The Bf 108A first flew in 1934, followed by the Bf 108B in 1935. The Bf 108B used the substantially larger, 12.67 litre displacement Argus As 10 air-cooled inverted V8 engine. The nickname Taifun (German for "typhoon") was given to her own aircraft by Elly Beinhorn, a well-known German pilot, and was generally adopted.

Operational history

Soon after the first production aircraft began to roll off the assembly line in Augsburg, several Bf 108s had set endurance records. The Bf 108 was adopted into Luftwaffe service during World War II, where it was primarily used as a personnel transport and liaison aircraft. The aircraft involved in the Mechelen Incident was a Bf 108. Production of the Bf 108 was transferred to occupied France during World War II and production continued after the war as the Nord 1000 Pingouin.

Popular culture

Bf 108s and postwar Nord 1000s played the role of Messerschmitt Bf 109 fighters in war movies, including The Longest Day, The Great Escape, 633 Squadron, Mosquito Squadron, and Von Ryan's Express.
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Old 10-06-2019, 11:10 AM
  #17619  
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That long shot was on target; it is indeed the Bf.108. A remarkably modern airplane when it was introduced, and one of the few German planes of that era that was very attractive. Instead of the usual Wikipedia link, here's one to a site with more detail: https://achtungskyhawk.com/2010/02/0...chmitt-bf-108/
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Old 10-06-2019, 11:48 AM
  #17620  
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I have that one on my short list to build. I am hoping to come across an old Graupner kit.
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Old 10-06-2019, 12:33 PM
  #17621  
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Originally Posted by Top_Gunn View Post
That long shot was on target; it is indeed the Bf.108. A remarkably modern airplane when it was introduced, and one of the few German planes of that era that was very attractive. Instead of the usual Wikipedia link, here's one to a site with more detail: https://achtungskyhawk.com/2010/02/0...chmitt-bf-108/
Well, dang! I wasn't expecting that. Sorry for messing up a perfectly good question, Al. Okay; I'll get something up later today. I have several subjects; just need to flesh one of them out a bit. Thanks; Ernie P.
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Old 10-06-2019, 07:59 PM
  #17622  
Ernie P.
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Okay; here we go again. I hope you enjoy the ride. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This military warbird was actually a derivative of a military transport aircraft design.

2. And the military transport aircraft was itself a derivative of a civilian prototype transport aircraft.
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Old 10-07-2019, 02:05 AM
  #17623  
Ernie P.
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Morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This military warbird was actually a derivative of a military transport aircraft design.

2. And the military transport aircraft was itself a derivative of a civilian prototype transport aircraft.

3. Our subject aircraft had revised wing flaps, canopy and tail assembly.
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Old 10-07-2019, 05:37 AM
  #17624  
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Lockheed Hudson bomber morphed from the Electra.
Sparky
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Old 10-07-2019, 06:12 AM
  #17625  
Ernie P.
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A good guess, Sparky; but not where we're headed. But you did earn a bonus clue. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This military warbird was actually a derivative of a military transport aircraft design.

2. And the military transport aircraft was itself a derivative of a civilian prototype transport aircraft.

3. Our subject aircraft had revised wing flaps, canopy and tail assembly.

4. And, it was fitted with landing gear that was semi retractable.
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