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Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

Old 12-01-2019, 03:27 PM
  #17826  
Ernie P.
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And a bonus clue. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This aircraft was not produced in large numbers; although several hundred were built.

2. It served in several different air forces.

3. And it was built in a number of different variants for those several air forces.

4. And, it served in combat for several of those air forces.

5. Some were produced under license by other countries.

6. But, interestingly, it was kept out of combat by the nation that produced it.

7. The producing nation removed it from service before the end of the war in which it served.

8. But it continued in service with other nations for more than a decade longer.

9. Our subject aircraft was itself a development of an earlier model by the same builder.

10. It too was a single engine monoplane.

11. And there was another, prototype, aircraft developed in parallel with our subject aircraft.

12. That aircraft, however, was not further developed; and only one was built.

13. Had it been accepted for service, that aircraft would have fulfilled an entirely different role than our subject aircraft.

14. But, the same role as the aircraft from which both were derived.

15. When in service with an ally, our subject aircraft was known by a different name.

16. Compared to its earlier progenitor, our subject aircraft was fitted with a revised tail and canopy.

17. And, a revised flap system.

18. It was also fitted with semi-retractable landing gear.

19. Which was removed and replaced with more conventional fixed landing gear before the military would accept it.

20. Although, later versions were accepted and equipped with new, fully retractable gear.
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Old 12-02-2019, 08:44 AM
  #17827  
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A morning and an afternoon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This aircraft was not produced in large numbers; although several hundred were built.

2. It served in several different air forces.

3. And it was built in a number of different variants for those several air forces.

4. And, it served in combat for several of those air forces.

5. Some were produced under license by other countries.

6. But, interestingly, it was kept out of combat by the nation that produced it.

7. The producing nation removed it from service before the end of the war in which it served.

8. But it continued in service with other nations for more than a decade longer.

9. Our subject aircraft was itself a development of an earlier model by the same builder.

10. It too was a single engine monoplane.

11. And there was another, prototype, aircraft developed in parallel with our subject aircraft.

12. That aircraft, however, was not further developed; and only one was built.

13. Had it been accepted for service, that aircraft would have fulfilled an entirely different role than our subject aircraft.

14. But, the same role as the aircraft from which both were derived.

15. When in service with an ally, our subject aircraft was known by a different name.

16. Compared to its progenitor, our subject aircraft was fitted with a revised tail and canopy.

17. And, a revised flap system.

18. It was also fitted with semi-retractable landing gear.

19. Which was removed and replaced with more conventional fixed landing gear before the military would accept it.

20. Although, later versions were accepted and equipped with new, fully retractable gear.

21. As ordered into production, our subject aircraft was equipped with perforated flaps, fixed landing gear with partial spats, and both an internal bomb bay and external bomb racks.

Last edited by Ernie P.; 12-02-2019 at 08:46 AM. Reason: Removing redundant word
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Old 12-02-2019, 01:39 PM
  #17828  
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Northrop A-17?
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Old 12-02-2019, 02:38 PM
  #17829  
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Originally Posted by Top_Gunn View Post
Northrop A-17?
It is indeed the Northrup A-17, Al; and you are now up. I knew that last clue might give it away, but it wasn't all that obvious. Excellent work and take it away. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This aircraft was not produced in large numbers; although several hundred were built.

2. It served in several different air forces.

3. And it was built in a number of different variants for those several air forces.

4. And, it served in combat for several of those air forces.

5. Some were produced under license by other countries.

6. But, interestingly, it was kept out of combat by the nation that produced it.

7. The producing nation removed it from service before the end of the war in which it served.

8. But it continued in service with other nations for more than a decade longer.

9. Our subject aircraft was itself a development of an earlier model by the same builder.

10. It too was a single engine monoplane.

11. And there was another, prototype, aircraft developed in parallel with our subject aircraft.

12. That aircraft, however, was not further developed; and only one was built.

13. Had it been accepted for service, that aircraft would have fulfilled an entirely different role than our subject aircraft.

14. But, the same role as the aircraft from which both were derived.

15. When in service with an ally, our subject aircraft was known by a different name.

16. Compared to its progenitor, our subject aircraft was fitted with a revised tail and canopy.

17. And, a revised flap system.

18. It was also fitted with semi-retractable landing gear.

19. Which was removed and replaced with more conventional fixed landing gear before the military would accept it.

20. Although, later versions were accepted and equipped with new, fully retractable gear.

21. As ordered into production, our subject aircraft was equipped with perforated flaps, fixed landing gear with partial spats, and both an internal bomb bay and external bomb racks.

22. The original order was for more than 100 aircraft.

23. And the second again for more than 100 aircraft.

24. But by the time the second order was delivered, the original company no longer existed.

25. The original company was absorbed by another aircraft company; and all foreign orders were named after the new company.

26. The new aircraft entered service and quickly proved to be very popular with its pilots and very reliable, which earned it high marks from both its pilots and ground crew.

27. Yet, in less than three years, our subject aircraft was considered to be unfit for service in its original role, because of decisions made as to what was required of such aircraft.

28. Those aircraft on hand were used for patrol duties.

29. Very limited and very specific patrol duties.

30. And eventually, they were used as utility aircraft.

31. A role which ended when the remaining aircraft were retired from service; before the war ended.

32. However, the aircraft continued in service with foreign air forces for some time.

33. Two South American countries flew then until the mid-1950’s in one case; the later 1950’s in another.

34. One foreign government purchased a production license, and built a number of them with different engines. 35. Another used the aircraft they had purchased as fighters; facing front line enemy aircraft; which didn’t work out well. 36. Some were used as advanced trainers and target tugs. 37. Our subject aircraft was a two seater. 38. And an attack aircraft.

39. A bit over 31 feet in length.

40. And a bit over 47 feet in wingspan.

41. A bit under 5,000 pounds empty.

42. And nearly 7,500 pounds loaded.

43. Roughly 750 hp.

44. Maximum speed was a bit over 200 mph.

45. Cruising speed was around 170 mph.

46. Range was a bit over 1,000 km.

47. Service ceiling was just under 20,000 feet.

48. Rate of climb was 1,350 ft/min.

49. Forward armament was four machine guns.

50. And one to the rear.





Answer: The Northrup A-17



The Northrop A-17, a development of the Northrop Gamma 2F model, was a two-seat, single-engine, monoplane, attack bomber built in 1935 by the Northrop Corporation for the U.S. Army Air Corps. When in British Commonwealth service during World War II, the A-17 was called Nomad.
Development and design

The Northrop Gamma 2F was an attack bomber derivative of the Northrop Gamma transport aircraft, developed in parallel with the Northrop Gamma 2C, (of which one was built), designated the YA-13 and XA-16. The Gamma 2F had a revised tail, cockpit canopy and wing flaps compared with the Gamma 2C, and was fitted with new semi-retractable landing gear. It was delivered to the United States Army Air Corps for tests on 6 October 1934, and after modifications which included fitting with a conventional fixed landing gear, was accepted by the Air Corps. A total of 110 aircraft were ordered as the A-17 in 1935.

The resulting A-17 was equipped with perforated flaps, and had fixed landing gear with partial fairings. It was fitted with an internal fuselage bomb bay that carried fragmentation bombs and well as external bomb racks.

Northrop developed new landing gear, this time completely retractable, producing the A-17A variant. This version was again purchased by the Army Air Corps, who placed orders for 129 aircraft. By the time these were delivered, the Northrop Corporation had been taken over by Douglas Aircraft Company, export models being known as the Douglas Model 8.



Operational historyUnited States

The A-17 entered service in February 1936, and proved a reliable and popular aircraft. However, in 1938, the Air Corps decided that attack aircraft should be multi-engined, rendering the A-17 surplus to requirements. From 14 December 1941, A-17s were used for coastal patrols by the 59th Bombardment Squadron (Light) on the Pacific side of the Panama Canal. The last remaining A-17s, used as utility aircraft, were retired from USAAF service in 1944. Other countries

Argentina

Argentina purchased 30 Model 8A-2s in 1937 and received them between February and March 1938; their serial numbers were between 348 and 377. These remained in frontline service until replaced by the I.Ae. 24 Calquin, continuing in service as trainers and reconnaissance aircraft until their last flight in 1954. Peru

Peru ordered ten Model 8A-3Ps, these being delivered from 1938 onwards. These aircraft were used in combat by Peru in the Ecuadorian-Peruvian war of July 1941. The survivors of these aircraft were supplemented by 13 Model 8A-5s from Norway (see below), delivered via the United States in 1943 (designated A-33). These remained in service until 1958. Sweden

The Swedish government purchased a licence for production of a Mercury-powered version, building 63 B 5Bs and 31 B 5Cs, production taking place from 1938 to 1941. They were replaced in service with the Swedish Air Force by SAAB 17s from 1944. The Swedish version was used as a dive bomber and as such it featured prominently in the 1941 film Första divisionen.

The Netherlands

The Netherlands, in urgent need of modern combat aircraft, placed an order for 18 Model 8A-3Ns in 1939, with all being delivered by the end of the year. Used in a fighter role for which they were unsuited, the majority were destroyed by Luftwaffe attacks on 10 May 1940, the first day of the German invasion. Iraq

Iraq purchased 15 Model 8A-4s, in 1940. They were destroyed in the Anglo-Iraqi War in 1941. Norway



Main article: Douglas A-33

Norway ordered 36 Model 8A-5Ns in 1940. These were not ready by the time of the German Invasion of Norway and were diverted to the Norwegian training camp in Canada, which became known as Little Norway. Norway decided to sell 18 of these aircraft as surplus to Peru, but these were embargoed by the United States, who requisitioned the aircraft, using them as trainers, designating them the A-33. Norway sold their surviving aircraft to Peru in 1943. Great Britain

In June 1940, 93 ex-USAAC aircraft were purchased by France, and refurbished by Douglas, including being given new engines. These were not delivered before the fall of France and 61 were taken over by the British Purchasing Commission for the British Commonwealth use under the name Northrop Nomad Mk I. South Africa

After the RAF assessed the Northrop Nomad Mk Is as "obsolete", most of the Nomads were sent to South Africa for use as trainers and target tugs. The Nomads suffered shortages of spare parts (particularly engines) and from 1942 were gradually replaced by Fairey Battles. The last Nomads were retired in 1944. Canada

The Royal Canadian Air Force received 32 Nomads that had been part of a French order of 93 aircraft. When France fell in 1940, this order was taken over by Great Britain who transferred 32 of the aircraft to Canada where they were used as advanced trainers and target tugs as part of the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan. These were serialed 3490 to 3521; all were assigned to No. 3 Training Command RCAF.

Variants



A-17

Initial production for USAAC. Fixed gear, powered by 750 hp (559 kW) Pratt & Whitney R-1535-11 Twin Wasp Jr engine; 110 built.

A-17A

Revised version for USAAC with retractable gear and 825 hp (615 kW) R-1535-13 engine; 129 built.

A-17AS

Three seat staff transport version for USAAC. Powered by 600 hp (447 kW) Pratt & Whitney R-1340 Wasp engine; two built.



Model 8A-1

Export version for Sweden. Fixed gear. Two Douglas built prototypes (Swedish designation B 5A), followed by 63 licensed built (by ASJA) B 5B aircraft powered by 920 hp (686 kW) Bristol Mercury XXIV engine; 31 similar B 5C built by SAAB.



Model 8A-2

Version for Argentina. Fitted with fixed gear, ventral gun position and powered by 840 kW (1,126 hp) Wright R-1820-G3 Cyclone; 30 built.





Model 8A-3N

Version of A-17A for Netherlands. Powered by 1,100 hp (820 kW) Pratt & Whitney R-1830 Twin Wasp S3C-G engine; 18 built.



Model 8A-3P

Version of A-17A for Peru. Powered by 1,000 hp (746 kW) GR-1820-G103 engine; ten built.



Model 8A-4

Version for Iraq, powered by a 1,000 hp (746 kW) GR-1820-G103 engine; 15 built.



Model 8A-5N

Version for Norway, powered by 1,200 hp (895 kW) GR-1830-G205A engine; 36 built. Later impressed into USAAF service as Douglas A-33.
Specifications (A-17)

Data from McDonnell Douglas Aircraft since 1920[32]

General characteristics· Crew: two (pilot and gunner)· · Length: 31 ft 8⅝ in (9.67 m)· · Wingspan: 47 ft 8˝ in (14.54 m)· · Height: 11 ft 10˝ in (3.62 m)· · Wing area: 363 sq ft (33.7m˛)· · Empty weight: 4,874 lb (2,211 kg)· · Loaded weight: 7,337 lb (3,328 kg)· · Powerplant: 1 × Pratt & Whitney R-1535-11 Twin Wasp Jr two-row air-cooled radial engine, 750 hp (560 kW)· Performance· Maximum speed: 206 mph (179 knots, 332 km/h)· · Cruise speed: 170 mph (149 knots, 274 km/h)· · Range: 650 mi (565 nmi, 1,046 km)· · Service ceiling: 19,400 ft (5,915 m)· · Rate of climb: 1,350 ft/min (6.9 m/s)· Armament· 4 × 0.3 in (7.62 mm) fixed forward M1919 Browning machine guns· · 1 × 0.3 in (7.62 mm) trainable rear machine gun· · Internal bay for bombs· · External wing bomb racks (total bomb load 1,200 lb/544 kg)
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Old 12-02-2019, 03:14 PM
  #17830  
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It was the clues about the several versions of landing gear that somehow triggered a dim recollection of pre-war American airplanes, which got me looking for one of those that matched the clues.

As it happens, for once I have a subject ready to go.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Only one built.

2. But that one was used in a war, though not in the role it had originally been designed for. It served for several years, unlike most one-offs.
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Old 12-02-2019, 05:03 PM
  #17831  
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Good job on the guess! I tried but could not come up with a thing sorry to say.
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Old 12-02-2019, 08:29 PM
  #17832  
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Now you are really starting to get me wondering!
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Old 12-02-2019, 08:41 PM
  #17833  
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Albatros B2
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Old 12-03-2019, 05:33 AM
  #17834  
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Not an Albatros, but here's a bonus clue and today's regular clue.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Only one built.

2. But that one was used in a war, though not in the role it had originally been designed for. It served for several years, unlike most one-offs.

3. Its design included advanced technology for the time.

4. But because of long development delays it was inferior to other similar aircraft that were already in production by the time it first flew.
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Old 12-03-2019, 06:14 AM
  #17835  
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Douglas XB-42 Mixmaster?
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Old 12-03-2019, 07:39 AM
  #17836  
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Not the Mixmaster. Here's your bonus clue.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Only one built.

2. But that one was used in a war, though not in the role it had originally been designed for. It served for several years, unlike most one-offs.

3. Its design included advanced technology for the time.

4. But because of long development delays it was inferior to other similar aircraft that were already in production by the time it first flew.

5. Inadequate funding and engine problems were two of the causes of the delays in development.
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Old 12-03-2019, 02:02 PM
  #17837  
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Now wait, many of the planes designed and built between 1914 and 1939 fit clue 5
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Old 12-04-2019, 05:46 AM
  #17838  
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Today's clue.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Only one built.

2. But that one was used in a war, though not in the role it had originally been designed for. It served for several years, unlike most one-offs.

3. Its design included advanced technology for the time.

4. But because of long development delays it was inferior to other similar aircraft that were already in production by the time it first flew.

5. Inadequate funding and engine problems were two of the causes of the delays in development.

6. It was designed to use water-cooled engines but first flew with air-cooled radial engines. These were later replaced by the production version of the engines it had been designed for. The radial-engine version was considerably slower.
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Old 12-05-2019, 05:37 AM
  #17839  
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Today's clue.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Only one built.

2. But that one was used in a war, though not in the role it had originally been designed for. It served for several years, unlike most one-offs.

3. Its design included advanced technology for the time.

4. But because of long development delays it was inferior to other similar aircraft that were already in production by the time it first flew.

5. Inadequate funding and engine problems were two of the causes of the delays in development.

6. It was designed to use water-cooled engines but first flew with air-cooled radial engines. These were later replaced by the production version of the engines it had been designed for. The radial-engine version was considerably slower.

7. Its first flight took place more than three years after its manufacturer was awarded the contract to make it. Even before it was finished it was clear that it would be obsolete when completed.
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Old 12-05-2019, 06:20 PM
  #17840  
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Originally Posted by Top_Gunn View Post
Today's clue.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Only one built.

2. But that one was used in a war, though not in the role it had originally been designed for. It served for several years, unlike most one-offs.

3. Its design included advanced technology for the time.

4. But because of long development delays it was inferior to other similar aircraft that were already in production by the time it first flew.

5. Inadequate funding and engine problems were two of the causes of the delays in development.

6. It was designed to use water-cooled engines but first flew with air-cooled radial engines. These were later replaced by the production version of the engines it had been designed for. The radial-engine version was considerably slower.

7. Its first flight took place more than three years after its manufacturer was awarded the contract to make it. Even before it was finished it was clear that it would be obsolete when completed.
Sorry guys; I do try to be quiet. How about Grandpappy; or just "he"? Thanks; Ernie P.

Answer: The Boeing XB-15



The Boeing XB-15 (Boeing 294) was a United States bomber aircraft designed in 1934 as a test for the United States Army Air Corps (USAAC) to see if it would be possible to build a heavy bomber with a 5,000 mi (8,000 km) range. For a year beginning in mid-1935 it was designated the XBLR-1. When it first flew in 1937, it was the most massive and voluminous aircraft ever built in the US. It set a number of load-to-altitude records for land-based aircraft, including carrying a 31,205 lb (14,154 kg) payload to 8,200 ft (2,500 m) on 30 July 1939.[1]



The aircraft's immense size allowed flight engineers to enter the wing through a crawlway and make minor repairs in flight. A 5,000 mi (8,000 km) flight took 33 hours at its 152 mph (245 km/h) cruising speed; the crew was made up of several shifts, and bunks allowed them to sleep when off duty.



Design and development



The specification that produced the XB-15 began in mid-1933 as "Project A", USAAC discussions regarding the possibility of flying a very large bomber with a range of 5,000 mi (8,000 km).[2] In April 1934 the USAAC contracted with Boeing and Martin to design a bomber capable of carrying 2,000 lb (910 kg) at 200 mph (320 km/h) over a distance of 5,000 miles.[3] Boeing gave the project the internal name of Model 294, while the USAAC called it the XB-15. Martin's design, the XB-16, was judged inferior by the USAAC before a prototype was built, and was canceled.[2]



The Boeing design team, headed by Jack Kylstra, initially intended the aircraft to use 2,600 hp (1,900 kW) Allison V-3420 liquid-cooled W engines; since these were not ready, 850 hp (630 kW) Pratt & Whitney R-1830 air-cooled radial engines were used instead.[2]



Starting in August 1934, Boeing began designing the Model 299 in answer to a proposal by the USAAC to replace the Martin B-10 bomber. The Model 299 design team incorporated elements of the Boeing 247[4] and the Model 294, especially its use of four engines.[5] The Model 299 design team worked alongside Klystra's team, but difficulties in fabricating such a large aircraft slowed progress on the 294.[3] The Model 299 flew first, on 28 July 1935.[6]



In mid-1935, the USAAC combined Project A with Project D; a proposal asking for "the maximum feasible range into the future." The combined program was designated BLR for "Bomber, Long Range". The XB-15 was renamed the XBLR-1; it was joined under the BLR program by two other projects: one from Douglas Aircraft, the XBLR-2 which later became the XB-19; and one from Sikorsky Aircraft called the XBLR-3, later canceled. The next year, the XBLR was dropped and the Boeing prototype was once again the XB-15.[2]



Unusual features that the XB-15 pioneered included an autopilot, deicing equipment, and two gasoline generators used as auxiliary power units (independent of the main engines) to power the 110-volt electrical system. The main engines were serviceable in flight using an access tunnel inside the wing. The aircraft contained a sizable crew compartment with bunkbeds, a galley and a lavatory. Finally, in September 1937 construction was finished, and on 15 October it first flew. Its double-wheel main landing gear remained down from takeoff to landing. On 2 December 1937, the XB-15 flew from Seattle to Wright Field in Ohio to be accepted by the USAAC for testing.[7]



With the Twin Wasp radial engines installed — the same number and type of engines fitted to the later Consolidated B-24 Liberator, with individual turbochargers added on the Liberators' Twin Wasp powerplants — the specified speed of 200 mph for the Twin Wasp-powered XB-15 was not quite reached even when the aircraft was empty; the best speed attained in level flight was 197 mph (317 km/h).[7] Loaded with the specified 2,000 pounds, the maximum speed was a disappointing 145 mph (233 km/h).[3] This was considered too slow for a combat aircraft, and the project was abandoned.[8] However, Boeing engineers projected that the prototype would be capable of carrying the heaviest air cargo to date: a load of 8,000 lb (3,600 kg).[3]



The design challenges stemming from the great size of the XB-15 were difficult to master, but the lessons learned by Boeing were later applied to the Model 314 flying boat, which essentially used the XB-15's wing design[2] with four of the more powerful Wright Twin Cyclone fourteen-cylinder radials for power. In 1938, the USAAC proposed to update the XB-15 to make the slightly larger Y1B-20, again using four Wright Twin Cyclones as with the Boeing 314, but the Secretary of War, Harry Hines Woodring, canceled the project before construction began, in favor of the expensive Douglas XB-19. Boeing went ahead with an internal redesign of the XB-15 called Model 316, a very heavy bomber with a high wing, a pressurized cabin and tricycle gear. The Model 316 was not built. The progression of design work starting with the XB-15 finally bore fruit with the Model 345 presented to the USAAC in May 1940, the very heavy bomber which resulted in the USAAF's Boeing B-29 Superfortress.



Operational history



The single prototype was assigned to the 2nd Bombardment Group at Langley Field, Virginia. Following the 24 January 1939 Chillán earthquake in Chile, the prototype flew a relief mission, carrying medical supplies. Commanded by Major Caleb V. Haynes, the aircraft carried 3,250 lb (1,470 kg) of American Red Cross emergency supplies to Santiago, making only two stops along the way, at France Field in the Panama Canal Zone, and at Lima, Peru.[9][10] Haynes was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Order of the Merit of Chile, and the whole crew earned the MacKay Trophy.[9]



Haynes piloted the XB-15 again on 10 June 1939 to return home the body of Mexican flier Francisco Sarabia who had died in a crash in the Potomac River. After flying back from Mexico City, Haynes and his copilot William D. Old undertook flight tests at Fairfield, Ohio with heavy loads. The XB-15 lifted a 22,046 pounds (10,000 kg) payload to a height of 8,228 feet (2,508 m), and 31,164 pounds (14,136 kg) to 6,561.6 feet (2,000.0 m), setting two world records for landplanes.[11] Haynes was awarded certificates issued by the National Aeronautics Association (NAA) for an international record for "the greatest payload carried to an altitude of 2,000 metres".[12] The XB-15 was not fast for a bomber but it was the fastest aircraft that could carry so much weight, and for such distances. In July 1939 Haynes received certificates from the NAA for an international 5,000 km (3,100 mi) speed record with a 2,000 kg (4,400 lb) payload. The latter performance also established a national closed circuit distance record of 3,129.241 miles (5,036.025 km).[12]



Flying from Langley, the XB-15 arrived at Albrook Field in Panama on 10 April 1940 and immediately began classified bombing tests of canal lock protections, commanded by Haynes and including Captain Curtis LeMay as navigator and Lieutenant John B. Montgomery as bombardier.[13] Of 150 bombs dropped, only three hit the target: a specially made bunker simulating a reinforced machine room. The few hits nevertheless led to improvements in bunker design.[10] In early May, Haynes and LeMay made a survey flight from Panama over the Galapagos islands, the inspection including Baltra Island.[8] Haynes piloted the XB-15 back to the United States, leaving Panama on 11 May 1940.[13]



In late 1940 the XB-15's defensive guns were removed at Duncan Field in Texas. Seats were attached so that Lend Lease aircraft ferry crews could be returned after delivery.


Cargo aircraft



On 6 May 1943 the Army Air Forces converted the only prototype into a transport, the aircraft being redesignated XC-105. A cargo hoist was mounted, and cargo doors fitted. Its maximum gross weight was increased to 92,000 lb (42,000 kg).[7] By this time, the aircraft was nicknamed "Grandpappy" by 20th Troop Carrier Squadron airmen.[14] It displayed nose art depicting an elephant carrying a large crate on its back labeled "supplies".[13] During World War II, the XC-105 carried freight and personnel to and from Florida, and throughout the Caribbean, based out of Albrook Field beginning in June 1943. Hundreds of young women were flown in "Grandpappy" from Miami to the Canal Zone to engage in US government work; these trips were dubbed the "Georgia Peach Run".[13] "Grandpappy" traveled to the Galapagos, landing on Baltra Island at the same airfield built following the XB-15 aerial survey of May 1940.[13]



"Grandpappy"′s flight crew, reduced to six men, described the aircraft as difficult to fly and service. Two fires and a complete failure of the electrical system occurred in the air.[7][13] The aircraft was retired on 18 December 1944, assigned to Panama Air Depot.[13] In June 1945, it was ordered to be scrapped at Albrook Field in Panama,[7] its engines and internal parts removed along with its vertical stabilizer and rudder. The remaining airframe was deposited at Diablo dump, a swampy landfill southwest of the runway, where it slowly sank from sight.[10][13][14] Squatters built shacks on stilts in the swamp, covering the remains. The former dump is now an industrial area, with "Grandpappy" underneath.[14]



During its 18 months of transport service, the XC-105 carried more than 5,200 passengers, 440,000 lb (200,000 kg) of cargo and 94,000 lb (43,000 kg) of mail. It flew 70 cargo trips and 60 missions including anti-submarine patrol. Unusually, the aircraft was consistently referred to as "he" by its crew.
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Old 12-06-2019, 05:36 AM
  #17841  
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Now that is a big airplane.
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Old 12-06-2019, 05:44 AM
  #17842  
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Not the XB-15. Here's today's clue and your bonus clue.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Only one built.

2. But that one was used in a war, though not in the role it had originally been designed for. It served for several years, unlike most one-offs.

3. Its design included advanced technology for the time.

4. But because of long development delays it was inferior to other similar aircraft that were already in production by the time it first flew.

5. Inadequate funding and engine problems were two of the causes of the delays in development.

6. It was designed to use water-cooled engines but first flew with air-cooled radial engines. These were later replaced by the production version of the engines it had been designed for. The radial-engine version was considerably slower.

7. Its first flight took place more than three years after its manufacturer was awarded the contract to make it. Even before it was finished it was clear that it would be obsolete when completed.

8. Even with the more-streamlined water-cooled engines, it was slow. But it had a very long range.

9. And it had a galley, so that meals could be prepared on long flights.
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Old 12-06-2019, 09:06 AM
  #17843  
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Originally Posted by Top_Gunn View Post
Not the XB-15. Here's today's clue and your bonus clue.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Only one built.

2. But that one was used in a war, though not in the role it had originally been designed for. It served for several years, unlike most one-offs.

3. Its design included advanced technology for the time.

4. But because of long development delays it was inferior to other similar aircraft that were already in production by the time it first flew.

5. Inadequate funding and engine problems were two of the causes of the delays in development.

6. It was designed to use water-cooled engines but first flew with air-cooled radial engines. These were later replaced by the production version of the engines it had been designed for. The radial-engine version was considerably slower.

7. Its first flight took place more than three years after its manufacturer was awarded the contract to make it. Even before it was finished it was clear that it would be obsolete when completed.

8. Even with the more-streamlined water-cooled engines, it was slow. But it had a very long range.

9. And it had a galley, so that meals could be prepared on long flights.
Well, drat! I had been thinking I was sitting on the answer for a while now. Okay; back to search mode. I'll give you credit, Al; this is a good one. A single prototype that went into active service during wartime. Hmmm.... Thanks; Ernie P.
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Old 12-06-2019, 09:13 AM
  #17844  
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It presents quite the challenge doesn't Ernie? Al has my full attention on this one as did proptop's quiz.
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Old 12-06-2019, 09:37 AM
  #17845  
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Maybe? Vickers type 42
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Old 12-06-2019, 12:21 PM
  #17846  
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Not the Vickers Type 432, but thanks for mentioning an interesting airplane I knew nothing about. Here's your bonus clue.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Only one built.

2. But that one was used in a war, though not in the role it had originally been designed for. It served for several years, unlike most one-offs.

3. Its design included advanced technology for the time.

4. But because of long development delays it was inferior to other similar aircraft that were already in production by the time it first flew.

5. Inadequate funding and engine problems were two of the causes of the delays in development.

6. It was designed to use water-cooled engines but first flew with air-cooled radial engines. These were later replaced by the production version of the engines it had been designed for. The radial-engine version was considerably slower.

7. Its first flight took place more than three years after its manufacturer was awarded the contract to make it. Even before it was finished it was clear that it would be obsolete when completed.

8. Even with the more-streamlined water-cooled engines, it was slow. But it had a very long range.

9. And it had a galley, so that meals could be prepared on long flights.

10. Tricycle landing gear.
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Old Yesterday, 05:24 AM
  #17847  
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Today's clue.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Only one built.

2. But that one was used in a war, though not in the role it had originally been designed for. It served for several years, unlike most one-offs.

3. Its design included advanced technology for the time.

4. But because of long development delays it was inferior to other similar aircraft that were already in production by the time it first flew.

5. Inadequate funding and engine problems were two of the causes of the delays in development.

6. It was designed to use water-cooled engines but first flew with air-cooled radial engines. These were later replaced by the production version of the engines it had been designed for. The radial-engine version was considerably slower.

7. Its first flight took place more than three years after its manufacturer was awarded the contract to make it. Even before it was finished it was clear that it would be obsolete when completed.

8. Even with the more-streamlined water-cooled engines, it was slow. But it had a very long range.

9. And it had a galley, so that meals could be prepared on long flights.

10. Tricycle landing gear.

11. When it became obvious that the airplane, then under construction, would not be satisfactory, the manufacturer wanted to stop the project, but the government insisted that it continue.
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Old Yesterday, 08:18 AM
  #17848  
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Originally Posted by Top_Gunn View Post
Today's clue.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Only one built.

2. But that one was used in a war, though not in the role it had originally been designed for. It served for several years, unlike most one-offs.

3. Its design included advanced technology for the time.

4. But because of long development delays it was inferior to other similar aircraft that were already in production by the time it first flew.

5. Inadequate funding and engine problems were two of the causes of the delays in development.

6. It was designed to use water-cooled engines but first flew with air-cooled radial engines. These were later replaced by the production version of the engines it had been designed for. The radial-engine version was considerably slower.

7. Its first flight took place more than three years after its manufacturer was awarded the contract to make it. Even before it was finished it was clear that it would be obsolete when completed.

8. Even with the more-streamlined water-cooled engines, it was slow. But it had a very long range.

9. And it had a galley, so that meals could be prepared on long flights.

10. Tricycle landing gear.

11. When it became obvious that the airplane, then under construction, would not be satisfactory, the manufacturer wanted to stop the project, but the government insisted that it continue.
Well, at least my latest choice meets the last two clues. How about the XB-19? Thanks; Ernie P.



Answer: The Douglas XB-19



The Douglas XB-19 was the largest bomber aircraft built for the United States Army Air Forces until 1946. It was originally given the designation XBLR-2 (XBLR denoting "Experimental Bomber Long Range").


Design and development



The XB-19 project was intended to test flight characteristics and design techniques for giant bombers. Despite advances in technology that made the XB-19 obsolete before it was completed, the Army Air Corps felt that the prototype would be useful for testing despite Douglas Aircraft wanting to cancel the expensive project. Its construction took so long that competition for the contracts to make the XB-35 and XB-36 occurred two months before its first flight.


The plane flew on 27 June 1941, more than three years after the construction contract was awarded. In 1943 the Wright R-3350 engines were replaced with Allison V-3420-11 V engines. After completion of testing the XB-19 was earmarked for conversion into a cargo aircraft, but modifications were not completed, and the aircraft flew for the last time on August 17, 1946. It was eventually scrapped at Tucson in June 1949. General characteristics
  • Crew: 16 combat crew, with provision for 2 additional flight mechanics and six-man relief crew
  • Length: 132 ft 4 in (40.34 m)
  • Wingspan: 212 ft 0 in (64.62 m)
  • Height: 42 ft 0 in (12.80 m)
  • Wing area: 4,285 sq ft (398.1 m2)
  • Empty weight: 86,000 lb (39,009 kg)
  • Gross weight: 140,000 lb (63,503 kg)
  • Max takeoff weight: 162,000 lb (73,482 kg)
  • Fuel capacity: 10,350 US gal (8,620 imp gal; 39,200 l) internals with optional auxiliary tanks of 824 US gal (686 imp gal; 3,120 l) capacity
  • Powerplant: 4 × Wright R-3350-5 Duplex Cyclone 18-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engines, 2,000 hp (1,500 kW) each
XB-19A Later fitted with 4x 2,600 hp (1,900 kW) Allison V-3420-11 24-cylinder engines
  • Propellers: 3-bladed constant-speed metal propellers, 17 ft 0 in (5.18 m) diameter
Performance
  • Maximum speed: 224 mph (360 km/h, 195 kn) at 15,700 ft (4,800 m)
  • Cruise speed: 135 mph (217 km/h, 117 kn)
  • Range: 5,200 mi (8,400 km, 4,500 nmi)
  • Ferry range: 7,710 mi (12,410 km, 6,700 nmi) with auxiliary tanks fitted
  • Service ceiling: 23,000 ft (7,000 m)
  • Rate of climb: 650 ft/min (3.3 m/s)
  • Wing loading: 32.6 lb/sq ft (159 kg/m2)
Armament
  • Guns:
  • Bombs: 18,700 lb (8,500 kg) internal; maximum bomb load of 37,100 lb (16,800 kg) including external racks with reduced fuel load
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Old Yesterday, 11:02 AM
  #17849  
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It is indeed the XB-19, later labeled the XB-19A when the radial engines were replaced. Until the B-36 came along it was the largest airplane ever made in the US. The Wikipedia entry is somewhat sparse, so here's a link to an excellent piece with some good photographs and links to further sources. This source says the XB-19A was in fact used as a transport; the Wikipedia piece gives the impression that using it as a transport may not have actually occurred.

https://foxtrotalpha.jalopnik.com/am...oug-1632864365
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Old Yesterday, 11:08 AM
  #17850  
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Wow check out that wing aspect ratio!
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