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-   -   Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz (http://www.rcuniverse.com/forum/rc-warbirds-warplanes-200/9452979-knowledge-quiz-warbird-wiz.html)

RCKen 02-14-2014 02:12 PM

I was initially thinking this was Hartman, but not sure now.

Ken

MJD 02-14-2014 02:55 PM

Are we talking about Reinhold Mewes?

Redback 02-14-2014 05:30 PM

To save Ernie scratching his head for more clues I am going to jump in. The clincher for me was the F 104 reference. The answer is <Drum Roll>

Robert Lusser

Robert Lusser (19 April 1899 - 19 January 1969) was a German engineer, aircraft designer and aviator. He is remembered both for several well-known Messerschmitt and Heinkel designs during World War II, and after the war for his theoretical study of the reliability of complex systems. In the post-war era, Lusser also pioneered the development of modern ski bindings, introducing the first teflon anti-friction pads to improve release.
He was born in Ulm. As a pilot, Lusser won the International Light Aircraft Contest in France in 1928. Next he participated in three out of four FAI International Tourist Plane Contests, flying Klemm aircraft, and completed all three taking quite high places (Challenge 1929: 4th, Challenge 1930: 13th, and Challenge 1932: 10th).[SUP][1][/SUP] In August 1930 he was 3rd in the handicapped race Giro Aereo d'Italia in Italy.[SUP][2][/SUP]
Lusser's first jobs were with the Klemm and Heinkel companies, before joining the newly-relaunched Bayerische Flugzeugwerke (Bavarian Aircraft Works, later Messerschmitt) in 1933. There, he assisted Willy Messerschmitt with his design for a touring aircraft, the Messerschmitt M37. This was later put into production as the Messerschmitt Bf 108, and formed the basis for the company's best known product, the Bf 109 fighter aircraft. By 1934, Lusser was head of Messerschmitt's design bureau and in charge of the Bf 110 heavy fighter project.
Lusser stayed with the company until 1938, when he returned to Heinkel. There, he led the design of two highly sophisticated aircraft that would never reach their full potential - the He 280 and the He 219. The He 280 was the first jet fighter to leave the drawing board, but which the RLM (Reichsluftfahrtministerium - "Reich Aviation Ministry") passed over in favour of the Messerschmitt Me 262. The He 219 was an advanced night-fighter design that was rejected by the RLM in August 1941 as being too complex to order into production because of its many innovations. Ernst Heinkel immediately dismissed Lusser and resubmitted a simplified design that eventually saw limited production.
From Heinkel, Lusser went to Fieseler, and there became involved with the company's efforts to produce a pilotless aircraft, initially designated the Fi 103. This was a collaborative effort between the company and engine manufacturer Argus, who were developing a pulsejet. Lusser worked with Argus engineer Fritz Gosslau to refine the design. The project was an initiative of the two companies, begun by Argus as early as 1934, and received little official interest until Erhard Milch recognised its potential in 1942 and assigned it high priority. Nazi propaganda would soon dub this flying bomb the V1, (Vergeltungswaffe - "revenge weapon"). It was a design competing with Wernher von Braun' s "V2" vertical takeoff rocket. Despite initial demonstrations before Luftwaffe made the V2 look more reliable, it was decided both designs should proceed into production. Lusser and von Braun were rivals, and even later their relationship was never frictionless. Near

Like many important German engineers, Lusser was brought to the United States after the end of World War II. There, he worked for the Navy, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and in 1953, re-joined von Braun's rocketry team at Huntsville, Alabama. During his six years there, he formalised his theories of reliability, which focus on the contribution that the reliability of each part makes to the reliability of an overall system. This is now known as Lusser's Law. Based on these calculations, he was to pronounce that von Braun's ambitions of reaching the Moon and Mars were doomed to failure because of the complexity of the spacecraft required.
He returned to Germany, and to the Messerschmitt company, by then, Messerschmitt-Bölkow. His alarming reliability study of the adaptations that the company was making to the F-104 Starfighter that it was building under licence soon turned out to be tragically correct.
In 1961 he ruptured his achilles tendon while testing his ski's cable bindings in his hotel room at Saas-Fee. He decided to attack the binding problem, developing the first bindings that gripped the toe of the boot, rather than the flange projecting from the front of the sole at the toe. This allowed the toe binding to release in any direction. In 1963 he quit his job at Messerschmitt to start the Lusser Binding Company.[SUP][3][/SUP] This was a major brand until his death in 1969. He died on 19 January 1969 in Munich.


Quite a story, no?


Now I've got to figure out a question. Not sure there's much more to ask!!!


Terry

Ernie P. 02-14-2014 06:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Redback (Post 11736751)
To save Ernie scratching his head for more clues I am going to jump in. The clincher for me was the F 104 reference. The answer is <Drum Roll>

Robert Lusser

Robert Lusser (19 April 1899 - 19 January 1969) was a German engineer, aircraft designer and aviator. He is remembered both for several well-known Messerschmitt and Heinkel designs during World War II, and after the war for his theoretical study of the reliability of complex systems. In the post-war era, Lusser also pioneered the development of modern ski bindings, introducing the first teflon anti-friction pads to improve release.
He was born in Ulm. As a pilot, Lusser won the International Light Aircraft Contest in France in 1928. Next he participated in three out of four FAI International Tourist Plane Contests, flying Klemm aircraft, and completed all three taking quite high places (Challenge 1929: 4th, Challenge 1930: 13th, and Challenge 1932: 10th).[SUP][1][/SUP] In August 1930 he was 3rd in the handicapped race Giro Aereo d'Italia in Italy.[SUP][2][/SUP]
Lusser's first jobs were with the Klemm and Heinkel companies, before joining the newly-relaunched Bayerische Flugzeugwerke (Bavarian Aircraft Works, later Messerschmitt) in 1933. There, he assisted Willy Messerschmitt with his design for a touring aircraft, the Messerschmitt M37. This was later put into production as the Messerschmitt Bf 108, and formed the basis for the company's best known product, the Bf 109 fighter aircraft. By 1934, Lusser was head of Messerschmitt's design bureau and in charge of the Bf 110 heavy fighter project.
Lusser stayed with the company until 1938, when he returned to Heinkel. There, he led the design of two highly sophisticated aircraft that would never reach their full potential - the He 280 and the He 219. The He 280 was the first jet fighter to leave the drawing board, but which the RLM (Reichsluftfahrtministerium - "Reich Aviation Ministry") passed over in favour of the Messerschmitt Me 262. The He 219 was an advanced night-fighter design that was rejected by the RLM in August 1941 as being too complex to order into production because of its many innovations. Ernst Heinkel immediately dismissed Lusser and resubmitted a simplified design that eventually saw limited production.
From Heinkel, Lusser went to Fieseler, and there became involved with the company's efforts to produce a pilotless aircraft, initially designated the Fi 103. This was a collaborative effort between the company and engine manufacturer Argus, who were developing a pulsejet. Lusser worked with Argus engineer Fritz Gosslau to refine the design. The project was an initiative of the two companies, begun by Argus as early as 1934, and received little official interest until Erhard Milch recognised its potential in 1942 and assigned it high priority. Nazi propaganda would soon dub this flying bomb the V1, (Vergeltungswaffe - "revenge weapon"). It was a design competing with Wernher von Braun' s "V2" vertical takeoff rocket. Despite initial demonstrations before Luftwaffe made the V2 look more reliable, it was decided both designs should proceed into production. Lusser and von Braun were rivals, and even later their relationship was never frictionless. Near

Like many important German engineers, Lusser was brought to the United States after the end of World War II. There, he worked for the Navy, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and in 1953, re-joined von Braun's rocketry team at Huntsville, Alabama. During his six years there, he formalised his theories of reliability, which focus on the contribution that the reliability of each part makes to the reliability of an overall system. This is now known as Lusser's Law. Based on these calculations, he was to pronounce that von Braun's ambitions of reaching the Moon and Mars were doomed to failure because of the complexity of the spacecraft required.
He returned to Germany, and to the Messerschmitt company, by then, Messerschmitt-Bölkow. His alarming reliability study of the adaptations that the company was making to the F-104 Starfighter that it was building under licence soon turned out to be tragically correct.
In 1961 he ruptured his achilles tendon while testing his ski's cable bindings in his hotel room at Saas-Fee. He decided to attack the binding problem, developing the first bindings that gripped the toe of the boot, rather than the flange projecting from the front of the sole at the toe. This allowed the toe binding to release in any direction. In 1963 he quit his job at Messerschmitt to start the Lusser Binding Company.[SUP][3][/SUP] This was a major brand until his death in 1969. He died on 19 January 1969 in Munich.


Quite a story, no?


Now I've got to figure out a question. Not sure there's much more to ask!!!


Terry


There are many questions yet unasked. And thanks for picking up the conch shell. I wanted to highlight one of the German WWII designers who didn't own his own company. They rarely get any exposure. Thanks; Ernie P.


Lusser's law, named after engineer Robert Lusser, is a prediction of reliability. It is also called the "probability product law of series components". It states that the reliability of a series system is equal to the product of the reliability of its component subsystems, if their failure modes are known to be statistically independent. This method is similar to the mathematical Multiplication principle.

Redback 02-14-2014 10:47 PM

OK, here we go:-

Looking for a twin engine ground attack aircraft.

I'll leave it open a while for WAGs and the Psychics among us, then dribble out a few more clues.


Terry

RCKen 02-15-2014 06:55 AM

Ok, Since we are in the WAG stage, I'll throw one out

Boeing GA-1??

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi..._on_ground.jpg

Ken

uncljoe 02-15-2014 07:58 AM

A 20 Boston

zippome 02-15-2014 08:22 AM

A-37 dragonfly ?

Redback 02-15-2014 08:47 PM

No correct answers so far. Time for another clue

Looking for a twin engine ground attack aircraft.
Turbo prop, crew of two.


Terry

RCKen 02-15-2014 09:08 PM

North American Rockwell OV-10 Bronco???

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...phosphorus.jpg

P,S. I hope so on this one. This is one of my favorite aircraft of all times. I love this warbird for some reason!!!! :D

Ken

Redback 02-15-2014 11:26 PM

Nice aircraft, looks all business. But not, I fear, the correct answer.

Another clue in the morning (our time) when I get into the office!

Terry

zippome 02-16-2014 05:27 AM

FMA IA 58 Pucara ?

MJD 02-16-2014 08:05 AM

Grumman OV-1 Mohawk?

Redback 02-16-2014 12:22 PM

Zippome is correct, Pucara it is!!!

The FMA IA 58 Pucará (Quechua: Fortress) is an Argentine ground-attack and counter-insurgency (COIN) aircraft manufactured by the Fábrica Militar de Aviones. It is a low-wing two-turboprop-engined all-metal monoplane with retractable landing gear, and is capable of operating from unprepared strips when operationally required. The type saw action during the Falklands War and the Sri Lankan Civil War.


Zipp, you're up

Terry

RCKen 02-16-2014 12:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Redback (Post 11738090)
Zippome is correct, Pucara it is!!!

The FMA IA 58 Pucará (Quechua: Fortress) is an Argentine ground-attack and counter-insurgency (COIN) aircraft manufactured by the Fábrica Militar de Aviones. It is a low-wing two-turboprop-engined all-metal monoplane with retractable landing gear, and is capable of operating from unprepared strips when operationally required. The type saw action during the Falklands War and the Sri Lankan Civil War.


Zipp, you're up

Terry

Phooey!!!!!:p

I had seen that one when I was looking around and thought about it!!!!

Ken

zippome 02-16-2014 01:42 PM

Wow, ok.
Let me dig something up.

psb667 02-16-2014 10:04 PM

finally can log back in

zippome 02-17-2014 07:22 PM

Ok, guys let's see how this one goes.
1. Single engined.
2. Monoplane.
3. Only 3 prototypes built. Production was cancelled, but not due to any deficiencies of the aircraft.
4. All 3 aircraft survived.
Well, let's see how far this ball rolls.

Thanks,
Zip

MJD 02-18-2014 03:06 PM

I'll start the bidding with the Hawker Tornado.

zippome 02-18-2014 04:39 PM

Not the Tornado.
1. Single engined.
2. Monoplane.
3. Only 3 prototypes built. Production was cancelled, but not due to any deficiencies of the aircraft.
4. All 3 aircraft survived.
5. Designed by a very well known designer.
6. The project was started for a different nation but was cancelled at a very early stage.
Ok , that's it for now..
Thanks,
Zip

Redback 02-18-2014 05:24 PM

FMA 1Ae 33 Pulqui?

Terry

JohnnyS 02-18-2014 08:45 PM

[h=1]Helwan HA-300?[/h]

zippome 02-19-2014 04:29 PM

JohnnyS got it!





[h=1]Helwan HA-300[/h]From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search
[TABLE="class: infobox, width: 315"]
[TR]
[TH="colspan: 2, align: center"]HA-300[/TH]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD="colspan: 2, align: center"]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...A-300_side.jpg[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TH]Role[/TH]
[TD]Single-seat interceptor[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TH]National origin[/TH]
[TD]Egypt[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TH]Manufacturer[/TH]
[TD]Egyptian General Aero Organisation[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TH]Designer[/TH]
[TD]Willy Messerschmitt[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TH]First flight[/TH]
[TD]7 March 1964[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TH]Retired[/TH]
[TD]May 1969[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TH]Primary user[/TH]
[TD]Egyptian Air Force[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TH]Number built[/TH]
[TD]3 prototypes[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TH]Program cost[/TH]
[TD]EGP 135 million (EGP 14 billion in 2009 values)[/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]

The Helwan HA-300 (Arabic: حلوان ٣٠٠‎) was a supersonic jet fighter aircraft developed in Egypt during the 1960s. It was designed by famous German aircraft engineer Willy Messerschmitt.
At various stages, Spain and India were involved in the development program. Spain agreed to finance two projects, the HA-200 and the HA-300, but cancelled financing the HA-300 project when it was just on paper. Then Egypt financed it, and the program transferred to Egypt where every part was built.
At a late stage India financed the Egyptian development of the Egyptian E-300 engine to use it on the Indian fighter jet HF-24 Marut.
The HA-300 was an ambitious project for Egypt, at the time seeking to expand both its civilian and defense aviation industry.
There were three prototypes built before termination of the project in 1969 when the fighter jet was about to enter service.
The first prototype was restored in 1991 and is now in the Deutsches Museum in Munich (Flugwerft Schleißheim).[SUP][1][/SUP]

[h=2]Contents[/h] [hide]

[h=2]Design and development[edit][/h][h=3]Origin[edit][/h]After World War II, Willy Messerschmitt was prohibited as a German citizen from undertaking any further research or development related to the German military, including the manufacture of aircraft, until 1955. He therefore moved to Spain where he joined Hispano Aviación and started designing an ultra light fighter aircraft in 1951.[SUP][2][/SUP] The development was very slow and Messerschmitt was only able to build a delta shaped plywood glider without a tail. Towed by a CASA 2.111, the test flight for the glider wasn't completed due to instability and the airplane didn't get airborne. Due to funding problems and the resultant long development time, Spain abandoned the project in 1960.[SUP][3][/SUP]
Egypt then acquired the design. The design team, headed by Messerschmitt, moved to Helwan, Egypt, to continue its work on the HA-300, which now stood for Helwan Aircraft 300.[SUP][1][/SUP] Ferdinand Brandner, an Austrian jet engine expert, was also invited to develop a turbojet for the new fighter. Egypt aimed to produce a lightweight supersonic, single-seat fighter that could join the Egyptian Air Force as an interceptor.[SUP][4][/SUP]
[h=3]HA-300[edit][/h]Development of the Egyptian HA-300 started in the test facilities and workshops in Factory No. 36 in Helwan, southeast of Cairo, under the supervision of the Egyptian General Aero Organisation (EGAO); officially the program started in 1959.
The first prototype of the HA-300, powered by a 2,200 kgp Orpheus Mk 703-S-10, first flew on 7 March 1964,[SUP][5][/SUP] and achieved Mach 1.13.[SUP][6][/SUP] Egypt sent two Egyptian pilots to India in 1964 to prepare for the HA-300 flight development.[SUP][1][/SUP] It was followed by a second Orpheus-powered prototype which first flew on 22 July 1965. The third and last prototype was fitted with the Egyptian E-300 engine, which it was hoped would make it capable of attaining 12,000 m and Mach 2.0 within 2.5 min of takeoff. This prototype was flight-tested at least once when it achieved a speed of Mach 2.1 with the Egyptian Brandner E-300 engine.
A total of 135 million Egyptian pounds was spent on the development, and the E-300 engine was given to the Indian government for use in the HF-24 Marut fighter.[SUP][3][/SUP]
[h=3]E-300 Engine[edit][/h]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...300_engine.jpghttp://bits.wikimedia.org/static-1.2...gnify-clip.png
Brandner E-300 engine


Main article: Brandner E-300
The HA-300 was originally designed for the afterburning Orpheus BOR 12 turbojet, but the engine did not achieve the minimum level of success Egypt required in the fighter jet[SUP][citation needed][/SUP]. President Nasser saw from the beginning a major threat to the national security in depending on British engine, because of the hostility that time between Egypt and Great Britain after the 1956 Suez crisis.
The fighter jet was then modified for the Egyptian Brandner E-300 engine, which would have an afterburning rating of 4,800 kgp, which achieved a high level of performance.
India also helped in the funding of the Egyptian E-300 jet engine in exchange for using it as a new powerplant for its HF-24 Marut.[SUP][1][/SUP] The E-300 jet engine ran successfully for the first time in July 1963.[SUP][3][/SUP]
[h=3]Termination[edit][/h]After its defeat in the Six-Day War, Egypt needed most of its military budget for acquiring new tanks, artillery, TU-16 heavy bombers, aircraft and air defenses. Due to this and the Soviet pressure to stop the program to prevent the HA-300 to win the challenge against the Soviet Mig-21[SUP][citation needed][/SUP], the high availability of Russian fighters with Soviet pilots, and the special discounts for arms sales to Egypt, the Egyptian government terminated the project finally in May 1969.[SUP][2][/SUP][SUP][4][/SUP]
[h=2]Survivors[edit][/h]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...20px-Ha300.jpghttp://bits.wikimedia.org/static-1.2...gnify-clip.png
Helwan HA-300


The first HA-300 prototype was bought by Daimler-Benz Aerospace AG (DASA) in 1991 and was airlifted to Germany for restoration at Manching. The process took MBB five and a half years to complete, and today the HA-300 is in the Deutsches Museum Flugwerft Schleissheim at Oberschleißheim near Munich.[SUP][1][/SUP] The second prototype is on display at the aviation museum at Al-maza Egyptian Air Force Base in Cairo away from public view.[SUP][citation needed][/SUP] The third, the first E-300 powered pre-production variant, is on display at the Helwan factory in Egypt.[SUP][citation needed][/SUP]
[h=2]Operators[edit][/h]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi..._Egypt.svg.png Egypt

[h=2]Specifications (HA-300)[edit][/h]General characteristics
  • Crew: 1 (pilot)
  • Length: 12.4 m (40 ft 8 in)
  • Wingspan: 5.84 m (19 ft 2 in)
  • Height: 3.15 m (10 ft 4 in)
  • Wing area: 16.7 m[SUP]2[/SUP] (180 sq ft)
  • Empty weight: 3,200 kg (7,055 lb)
  • Gross weight: 5,443 kg (12,000 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Bristol Orpheus 703 or Brandner E-300 turbojet, 21.6 kN (4,900 lbf) thrust (Orpheus)
Performance
  • Maximum speed: Mach 2.1 with Brandner E-300 engine, 1.7 Bristol Orpheus engine
  • Combat range: 1,400 km (870 mi; 756 nmi)
  • Service ceiling: 18,000 m (59,055 ft)
  • Rate of climb: 203 m/s (40,000 ft/min)
Armament

[TABLE="width: 175"]
[TR]
[TD="align: center"]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...acionavion.png[/TD]
[TD]Aviation portal[/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]

<img src="//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special:CentralAutoLogin/start?type=1x1" alt="" titl

zippome 02-19-2014 04:29 PM

Ok JohnnyS, You're UP!

JohnnyS 02-19-2014 07:45 PM

:)

New one:

1. Once a specially modified model of this aircraft held the world absolute speed record.
2. Developed into a bomber from a reconnaissance aircraft.
3. Single engine.


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