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  1. #1
    stevegauth30's Avatar
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    enlarging plans?

    can anyone tell me how to go about enlarging a set of plans? The plans are for a Flyline Models Great Lakes Trainer biplane that i just completed. The plane now has about a 40 inch WS, and i would like to build it again, only with maybe a 60 inch WS. Im sure theres a precise way to do it, I just dont know. Any input will be appreciated. Steve.
    CUB BROTHERHOOD # 151, CORSAIR BROTHERHOOD # 80, CLUB SAITO # 804, WACO BROTHER #242, P-47 BROTHER #98, GLOW HEAD #1

  2. #2

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    RE: enlarging plans?

    Have the plans scanned to a pdf file, then a print service can enlarge them to whatever scale you want.

  3. #3

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    RE: enlarging plans?

    60 divided by 40 = 1.5 so have a local copyist enlarge 150%. Is that the kind of info you seek?

  4. #4
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    RE: enlarging plans?

    As others explain, there is a difference regarding the process of enlargement between paper drawings and electronic (AutoCAD) drawings.

    Paper drawings need to be scanned and converted into a less flexible electronic form (depending on the type of scanner), which is then scaled up (1.5 times in your case).

    Note that the width of lines will increase 1.5 times, and that any dimensional text will not apply.

    Any local Office Depot or Kinko's store can help you with your project.
    Lnewqban - "God will not look you over for medals, degrees or diplomas, but for scars. He has achieved success who has worked well, laughed often, and loved much." - Elbert Hubbard

  5. #5
    stevegauth30's Avatar
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    RE: enlarging plans?



    first of all, i appreciate all of you taking your time to help. Ok, so that all makes sense, but how about the dimensions of material? For instance, if the plans now call for a 3/16 x 1/4 spar, how do i figure out the new size?

    CUB BROTHERHOOD # 151, CORSAIR BROTHERHOOD # 80, CLUB SAITO # 804, WACO BROTHER #242, P-47 BROTHER #98, GLOW HEAD #1

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    RE: enlarging plans?

    You have to let your experience be the guide when picking out materials. Sometimes you can just let the sizes grow with the plans or they will be silly big. Case by case.

  7. #7

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    RE: enlarging plans?

    Hi Steve- I have this plan spread out and can comment how I'd build it that size. Your mileage may vary! You could build it per the plans and use the cockpits to access servos, etc. A one piece 60" airplane would be a transportation nightmare for me so the wings would have to be made removable. Here's how I'd proceed:

    I'd keep the spars the original dimension but use spruce. I'd frame the fuse using good 1/4" (light) balsa. Make the cockpit area be a hatch. The head rest stays with basic fuse. After building the fuse and sheeting the cockpit area with 1/16" balsa, separate this from fuse then cover the hatch with 1/64 ply. Have the ply overlap the joint a 'smidge' so that the gap won't show. You will need to incorporate the struts and upper wing into the hatch build. I don't like for wing bolts and stuff like that to show so I'd make the hatch release be thru the engine/ tank access. Just remove cowl top (as per plans). Then remove two pins that tie the fuse to the hatch/ cabane anchor blocks. You'll have to use 'imagination' there but the pins would be received by the spruce or maple cabane mounts. One pin each side which align with airplane's flight path- make sense? The rear of hatch would have a dowel to be received by fuse to keep hatch aligned. I'd have two nice 1/8" ply (not lite ply) fuse former that the LG blocks would be mounted. These would extend up so the hatch pins would pass thru them connecting the wing/ cabanes/ hatch to fuse. This would be the most difficult part of build but would give you full access to interior of airplane. The lower wing would be two parts and plug into fuse. Like I say, this is how I'd do it. Others may chime in and comment.

  8. #8

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    RE: enlarging plans?

    For spars and similar items you need to use whatever is normally used for that size and type of model. You will just need to use the models shape and design a new structure appropriate to the type of model. Its not a question of just enlarging the plans when its such a big increase as 50 percent. A 60 inch biplane is an awful lot bigger & chunkier than a 40 inch one!

    It's better to buy a plan already designed for the size you want.

  9. #9
    stevegauth30's Avatar
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    RE: enlarging plans?

    My whole reason for wanting to build this one bigger is that i really like the plane. Its not that i just want a 60 inch bipe because i already have five bipes 60 inches or better. Its the plane it self, and the build itself that i really enjoy. I would just like it on a bigger scale and wasnt sure if there was a sort of formula to it, or just " make the plans bigger " and wing it. Im sure i can take it to kinkos and tell them to enlarge it to 150 % and just take it from there. Thanks, Steve.
    CUB BROTHERHOOD # 151, CORSAIR BROTHERHOOD # 80, CLUB SAITO # 804, WACO BROTHER #242, P-47 BROTHER #98, GLOW HEAD #1

  10. #10

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    RE: enlarging plans?

    If you just enlarge it it won't fly the same as the smaller version! It's a skilled job to make the model just light enough to fly well but just strong enough to withstand any strain placed on it.
    There is a 47 inch Great Lakes by Gordon Whitehead in the RCM plan service https://www.rcmplans.com/index.php?m...ha_filter_id=0
    This is a scale version of the Harold Krier Great Lakes Special which was a modifed Great Lakes trainer with radial engine & rounded fuselage The model design was also published in RC ModelWorld Jan 1990 so the plan should also be available from Traplet in England


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