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panel lines into a mold

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Old 10-07-2013, 09:13 AM
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jeffbechtel
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Default panel lines into a mold

I am in the process of making a screatch built 1:5 scale T-6 Texan II and want to put the panel lines on it. I am making a mold of the fuselage to then create a plug from to make my composite fuselage from. Or would it be better to just paint the panel lines. Any help with creating the panel lines are very welcome.
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Old 10-08-2013, 12:06 PM
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BMatthews
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PROPER panel lines would be depressions in the final shape. So what you could do is make your plug then groove the panel lines into the plug. This would create raised lines on the mold which would form the desired groove like panel lines on the final product The trick is to play around with options for forming nice clean grooves that can be replicated in the mold without packing up with mold release and the like. More than likely the lines would need to be bigger than scale to avoid becoming lost or badly broken up and distorted by the process.

You'd also need to take care to avoid filling in the lines, rivet marks and fake screw heads during the finishing process. You might be using the same weight primer and paint as the full scale stuff but when the scale is considered the paint thickness is sort of like using Rhino Hide or Linex truck bed liner goop on the full size aircraft.
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Old 10-08-2013, 05:52 PM
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jeffbechtel
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thanks for the help with this sounds like best to do some test lines on a test mold
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Old 10-11-2013, 03:49 PM
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If you plan on making a plug, I would add all your panel lines and details on the plug using one of the more popular techniques. Most common method is to make the details in primer. For butt joint panel lines, use 1/64" chart tape. Once covered with primer, you peel the tape up leaving a 1/64" wide line the thickness of the primer coat. For lap joints, you place painters tape on the part to be the lower panel, and build up primer on the high panel. When you remove the tape, you have the step simulating the lap joint. To add flush rivets, use a 1/32" brass tube attached to a soldering iron to melt the rivets into the primer. To add dome rivets, use a syringe with thinned wood glue. Once done, wax and polish and make your molds. When you make your parts, give a light coat of epoxy to the inside of the mold to capture all the details, then do the rest of your layup.

Scott
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Old 10-17-2013, 07:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saramos View Post
If you plan on making a plug, I would add all your panel lines and details on the plug using one of the more popular techniques. Most common method is to make the details in primer. For butt joint panel lines, use 1/64" chart tape. Once covered with primer, you peel the tape up leaving a 1/64" wide line the thickness of the primer coat. For lap joints, you place painters tape on the part to be the lower panel, and build up primer on the high panel. When you remove the tape, you have the step simulating the lap joint. To add flush rivets, use a 1/32" brass tube attached to a soldering iron to melt the rivets into the primer. To add dome rivets, use a syringe with thinned wood glue. Once done, wax and polish and make your molds. When you make your parts, give a light coat of epoxy to the inside of the mold to capture all the details, then do the rest of your layup.

Scott
I tried the scratching the lines into the plug method and it was a disaster. Lining an entire plug without at least one oops is imposible. I have heard of saramos's method before and it sounds a lot more reliable and will be what I try next time I try it.
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Old 10-20-2013, 01:09 PM
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You will need flexible rules for doing the layout. I use c-thru brand. I mark out the panel lines then lay the tape. Use a different color marker than the tape. One issue with 1/64" tape is that it likes to twist. When doing rivets, I prefer to evenly space the rivets for each panel rather than using a fixed distance between rivets. This will give better looking intersections.

This photo shows the layout of the panel lines
[ATTACH=CONFIG]1931217[/ATTACH]

Here, the tape has not yet been removed from the lower panel line but has been removed from the upper panel line
[ATTACH=CONFIG]1931218[/ATTACH]

This photo shows the layout for the rivets. Also note the raised panels of the wing fairing and fuel tank.
[ATTACH=CONFIG]1931219[/ATTACH]

Here you see how the brass tube makes flush rivets.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]1931220[/ATTACH]

Here is the final result after paint and weathering.
[ATTACH=CONFIG]1931221[/ATTACH]

Hope this helps

Scott

Last edited by saramos; 10-20-2013 at 01:13 PM.
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