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  1. #1

    Wink My first scratch built rc plane using Ice cream sticks...:D

    This is my first ever attempt to build an Rc plane.

    I used ice-cream sticks or Popsicle sticks to build the main structure.

    hope you like it...

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  2. #2
    Moderator BMatthews's Avatar
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    Well that is certainly an interesting use of a medium....

    What's the point you're trying to prove here? That it CAN be done? Because even if I didn't know much about model building a cruise around the local home building store would still suggest better alternatives..... LONGER alternatives for starters....

    On the other hand if it was done to prove a bet or to just because you want to see if it can work then I'd say it looks great.
    Witty saying to be plagarized shortly.....

  3. #3
    SrTelemaster150's Avatar
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    Does it fly?
    Club Saito #785 - FA91S, FA150, FA180, FA180HC/BBC, FA200TI, FA300TTDP: All with CH Ignitions CDI/Glow fuel
    SIG BH #41
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  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by BMatthews View Post
    Well that is certainly an interesting use of a medium....

    What's the point you're trying to prove here? That it CAN be done? Because even if I didn't know much about model building a cruise around the local home building store would still suggest better alternatives..... LONGER alternatives for starters....

    On the other hand if it was done to prove a bet or to just because you want to see if it can work then I'd say it looks great.
    I just wanted to see if it works and wanted to make a plane in a weight class close to that of a similar size balsa plane would be....
    the weight was 824 grams against a predicted 900 grams so was happy to get the results....
    I know it is a little heavier than balsa but anyways the cost for the structure is next to nothing....

    I flew the planes thrice....
    First test flight was the best with low winds, I flew the plane for about 3 minutes (guess a good time for an inexperienced and a horrible pilot like me....)
    the plane ended up in a crash though, as I lost visual and it took a nose dive....
    got a horrible damage....
    but the advantage of the kind of structure was that I could replace individual struts and the model was ready to fly in no time... (although motor had to be opened to rearrange the shaft pushed inside due to crash and for cleaning...)

    second flight was done on probably the worst day with heavy winds fortunately, I had someone to record the video of the plane this time unlike last time....
    the flight was short, around 10 seconds with the model trying to fly against the winds....
    tried vertical climbs, but did not work out and it fell...
    here is the video:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UsRghBj-at8

    the short whistle you hear is actually the wind blowing past us...
    here is a slow version to just see what happened:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pk4s97b2QFw

    I was able to recover it the first time when my friend threw it at a very high angle of attack but then, second time I couldn't..
    I have also posted a few clicks after the first crash, the model after repair, the skeleton building pics, including airfoil, wing, fuselage and tail...

    take a look and let me know about your opinions....

    Plane after first crash:
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    Repaired for second flight:
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    pics taken during construction:
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    It takes dedication to make and
    spirit to fly...

  5. #5
    foodstick's Avatar
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    If you are wanting to avoid balsa..

    Do you have access to a saw that would allow you to cut long narrow pieces of wood off of a yard stick?, or maybe you could use a light card board tube for the rear of the plane. I am pretty set on using balsa, but hey have fun experimenting ! Its all about the fun.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by foodstick View Post
    If you are wanting to avoid balsa..

    Do you have access to a saw that would allow you to cut long narrow pieces of wood off of a yard stick?, or maybe you could use a light card board tube for the rear of the plane. I am pretty set on using balsa, but hey have fun experimenting ! Its all about the fun.
    got nothing more than a swiss knife....
    will definitely try out your suggestion and other stuff...
    thanks...
    It is fun making weird contraptions or regular planes with unconventional stuff and watch them fly... (that is if they fly....)
    It takes dedication to make and
    spirit to fly...

  7. #7

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    You asked for our opinions. My opinion is sensible people build their planes from the most suitable materials for the job, start with plans from an experienced designer, get help flying from an experienced pilot for their first flights and use lolly sticks only for mixing epoxy.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by kdc View Post
    You asked for our opinions. My opinion is sensible people build their planes from the most suitable materials for the job, start with plans from an experienced designer, get help flying from an experienced pilot for their first flights and use lolly sticks only for mixing epoxy.
    totally true...
    but then it is fun to experiment and see what you can achieve...

    and at times we do go thinking a lot more than what can be achieved but heck would never know unless we try...
    the experienced designers also would have started somewhere to become what they are today...

    thanks for your opinion really appreciate your thoughts..
    you probably have tons of more experience than and by no means do I wish to offend you and also apologize if I have.

    P.S. I did use lolly sticks for mixing epoxy too....
    It takes dedication to make and
    spirit to fly...

  9. #9

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    Good going Advickarcher, we need more of you experimenter types. I like to see that kind of experimentation in the hobby, bet you have an interesting and profitable career as your life continues. Keep it up.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Rodney View Post
    Good going Advickarcher, we need more of you experimenter types. I like to see that kind of experimentation in the hobby, bet you have an interesting and profitable career as your life continues. Keep it up.
    thanks a lot Rodney...
    will keep experimenting and building...
    It takes dedication to make and
    spirit to fly...

  11. #11

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    Avikarcher, if it works for you then go for it. When I was a kid I lived a block or so from a hobby shop and spent a lot of time in there just looking at the stuff they had in there but never buying much as I was a poor kid that made his money mowing yards for fifty cents to if I got lucky, a dollar. However, I would go over to the place of my dreams when I had some money and buy some balsa wood and glue and somehow. someway, would build these hand launched gliders that would glide a reasonable distance and for the most part survived. The fuses were a broom stick and the wings were built up. I had nothing to go on as far as weight and balance and I have no clue what I used for covering. I didn't know what an airfoil was, lol. But somehow they flew. The last one I built I traded for a Schwinn three speed bike. So what I am trying to say, if it works for you, go for it. You have my respect.

  12. #12
    sensei's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rodney View Post
    Good going Advickarcher, we need more of you experimenter types. I like to see that kind of experimentation in the hobby, bet you have an interesting and profitable career as your life continues. Keep it up.
    I agree, good going and continue to dream...

    Bob
    Fly It Like You Stole It!!!

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by balsa brain View Post
    Avikarcher, if it works for you then go for it. When I was a kid I lived a block or so from a hobby shop and spent a lot of time in there just looking at the stuff they had in there but never buying much as I was a poor kid that made his money mowing yards for fifty cents to if I got lucky, a dollar. However, I would go over to the place of my dreams when I had some money and buy some balsa wood and glue and somehow. someway, would build these hand launched gliders that would glide a reasonable distance and for the most part survived. The fuses were a broom stick and the wings were built up. I had nothing to go on as far as weight and balance and I have no clue what I used for covering. I didn't know what an airfoil was, lol. But somehow they flew. The last one I built I traded for a Schwinn three speed bike. So what I am trying to say, if it works for you, go for it. You have my respect.
    Thank you balsa brain...
    you have respect from my side as well for such dedication towards your dream and hard work....



    Quote Originally Posted by sensei View Post
    I agree, good going and continue to dream...

    Bob
    thanks a lot sensei...
    It takes dedication to make and
    spirit to fly...

  14. #14
    Moderator BMatthews's Avatar
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    Finally got back to this thread.

    Given that you're using the sticks to more or less prove it can be done I say you're doing FANTASTICALLY! ! ! ! As long as you don't get delusions of building something serious with popsicle sticks it's all great fun.

    As you say it's great fun and a great learning experience.

    As mentioned above if you ever get access to some time with a table or bandsaw you can make enough useable material from a couple of 4 foot pieces of pine 1x6 to make two or three models in the same style as the old balsa old timers. And I'm talking thin 5/32 square sticks for the stick built fuselage and 3/64 x 3/4 "sheet stock" for making ribs for the wing and tail surfaces. Keep it in mind in case you learn that someone in your family or some buddy has access to such a saw.
    Witty saying to be plagarized shortly.....

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by BMatthews View Post
    Finally got back to this thread.

    Given that you're using the sticks to more or less prove it can be done I say you're doing FANTASTICALLY! ! ! ! As long as you don't get delusions of building something serious with popsicle sticks it's all great fun.

    As you say it's great fun and a great learning experience.

    As mentioned above if you ever get access to some time with a table or bandsaw you can make enough useable material from a couple of 4 foot pieces of pine 1x6 to make two or three models in the same style as the old balsa old timers. And I'm talking thin 5/32 square sticks for the stick built fuselage and 3/64 x 3/4 "sheet stock" for making ribs for the wing and tail surfaces. Keep it in mind in case you learn that someone in your family or some buddy has access to such a saw.

    thanks...
    it was a brilliant experience.
    also good advice as using longer strips will be a lot better...
    will probably try that out as well...

    for now I am trying out a complete foam design...
    lets see how it works out...
    It takes dedication to make and
    spirit to fly...


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