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  1. #101

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    RE: Tips to make you a Better Pilot:


    ORIGINAL: speedracerntrixie


    ORIGINAL: Top_Gunn

    Appliying rudder into the wind is simply to hold position and has little to do with attitude. Just before touch down the rudder is nuetralized as to not rip the gear off the airplane. Simple as that. Bob and I have done literally thousands of landings that way
    I'm puzzled. If the wings are level and the nose is pointed into the wind, you are just crabbing, which as Harry and I have been saying is the usual way to handle a crosswind. But if you are actually holding rudder into the wind, with the wings level, you would be constantly making a skidding turn toward the direction of the wind. Why would you want to do that?

    Bob says he counteracts the effect of holding rudder into the wind by holding the wing away from the wind down. So he's slipping, but with the low wing on the downwind side, so that the plane's sideways motion is away from the wind. Why do that?

    I don't see how having extra power and lower wing loading justifies making skidding turns the norm. It's true, as Major T says, that different planes handle differently. In some you lead the turn with rudder, in others with aileron. I've never heard of one where skidding is routine, though. The one difference between models and full scale that makes a difference here is that models don't have passengers who would likely become uncomfortable in skidding turns.

    The idea is to hold enough rudder and match power so that the models flight track is parallel to the runway. Then just before touch down you would ease off and maybe even go opposite rudder to adjust the models attitude as to not land in a skidding condition. I will agree that different airplanes handle this differently but what I see lots of times here on RCU is that someone like Bob or myself will give good solid advise based on 30+ years of R/C flying and then some of the full scale pilots come in and do their best to debunk our advise while having little to no first hand experience with the models we are talking about and justify it as being normal practice for full scale.

    Maybe we mean different things by "holding rudder." If you keep the wings level and hold rudder in one direction your plane will keep up a skidding turn into the wind. I assume you aren't doing that. If what you're doing is using rudder to yaw into the wind and then crabbing, using rudder to correct when the plane gets off course, you're flying a normal approach except that you're using rudder rather than coordinated turns for corrections. That will work, though it's not the way I or anyone I know flies, and it's not the way anyone flies normal full-scale planes either. But if that works for you fine. Your passengers won't complain. Just please don't tell people that those of us who make our turns into the wind coordinated are doing something wrong. You may recall that we got on to the rudder topic because some guy was advising people that "the rudder turns the plane." That's not the way most pilots, full-scale or RC, fly.
    Al Gunn
    Ultra Sport Brotherhood No. 9

  2. #102
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    RE: Tips to make you a Better Pilot:

    Al I'm not understanding how you are coming to the conclusion that if I'm wings level and holding rudder that I have to be turning. The rudder is simply used to hold position relitive to the runway. This is the same tecnique that is used to keep box depth when flying IMAC or pattern. Imagine flying a constant line 150 ft beyond the runway but you have 10 knots of wind in your face. How would you keep the airplane from drifting in towards you?
    Of course it's true, I read it on the Internet.

  3. #103
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    RE: Tips to make you a Better Pilot:

    ORIGINAL: speedracerntrixie

    Al I'm not understanding how you are coming to the conclusion that if I'm wings level and holding rudder that I have to be turning. The rudder is simply used to hold position relitive to the runway. This is the same tecnique that is used to keep box depth when flying IMAC or pattern. Imagine flying a constant line 150 ft beyond the runway but you have 10 knots of wind in your face. How would you keep the airplane from drifting in towards you?
    The only way I know of is to kick that rudder into the wind and carry that wing until it's time to straighten up and set it on the mains.

    Bob
    Fly It Like You Stole It!!!

  4. #104

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    RE: Tips to make you a Better Pilot:

    LOL, ain't that the truth.
    I don\'\'\'\'t always crash, but when I do!

  5. #105

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    RE: Tips to make you a Better Pilot:


    ORIGINAL: invertmast

    The guys who taught me to fly said to not even think about buying a 2nd airplane until i was able to outfly the trainer i learned on. I flew that airplane so much it was literally falling apart when you would start. But! I could do every manuever that airplane was possible of and every landing was as smooth as grass.

    IMO the way to become a better pilot has nothing to do with learning aerobatics (at first). You need to be able to:

    1. Fly a wings level straight line without changing altitude
    2. Point the airplane exactly where you want it in order to maintain the correct GROUND track parallel to the flight line.
    3. Be able to make a consistent climbing or descending turn through 90, 180 and 360 degrees.
    4. Be able to make a turn to final and be wings level to allow the airplanes ground track to go straight down the centerline of the runway with minor changes in heading and bank.
    5. Maintain a consistent speed and descent rate through a descending 90* turn to final, this sets you up for a perfect landing everytime.
    6. Flare the airplane for landing everytime so the wheels touch down as the wing stops flying.

    While many of those items above seem really simple, 95% of the pilots i see around cant do one of them, let alone combinations of them! Being a master of those basic skills will set you up for success on flying near every airplane you come across.

    Now when it comes to aerobatics, lots of stick time and some mentors really help.

    Yes I agree I can do 4 of the six well working on the others. They sound very simple and easy but are very hard to do smoothly, even harder to do in a scale manner
    Be safe
    Ken Smith

  6. #106

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    RE: Tips to make you a Better Pilot:

    ORIGINAL: sensei

    ORIGINAL: speedracerntrixie

    Al I'm not understanding how you are coming to the conclusion that if I'm wings level and holding rudder that I have to be turning. The rudder is simply used to hold position relitive to the runway. This is the same tecnique that is used to keep box depth when flying IMAC or pattern. Imagine flying a constant line 150 ft beyond the runway but you have 10 knots of wind in your face. How would you keep the airplane from drifting in towards you?
    The only way I know of is to kick that rudder into the wind and carry that wing until it's time to straighten up and set it on the mains.

    Bob

    Rudder into the wind or aileron into the wind? I never heard when correcting for wind drift you push the rudder into the wind and aileron away to hold heading. Its aileron into the wind and rudder to hold heading. You want the low wing on the side which the wind is coming from. Don`t believe me there is a good show called Flying Wild Alaska. There are lots of footage of cross wind landings in C-207s C-208s C206s and others at cross winds in excess of 40+ knots. Go down load it from one of the torrent sites ( Extra Torrent ) and then spend a day looking at some highly skilled pilots, then come back and tell me if you see any of them holding rudder into the wind. But you have to look at the show first before you start arguing this point.
    Also if the rudder is NOT used for steering then all of you that is saying that go take your tail dragger out to the field place it at the end of the runway and take off with the rudder disconnected and use the aileron to hold the nose on the center line. And then post the video to prove that the rudder was not connected.
    91-Zulu

  7. #107
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    RE: Tips to make you a Better Pilot:

    As I have stated before, we are talking about MODEL airplanes here right? If you read back I have not advised anyone how to fly their full scale airplane. Reason for that is I am not a full scale pilot and recognise the differences between the two and just feel that I am not qualified to do so based on those differences. So as far as models go and to be specific someone who flys IMAC and pattern we would NEVER want to fly around with one wing low to compensate for wind drift. This would be giving up 2 points per manuver for not beginning and ending each manuver with wings level. The resolve is to use rudder only to compensate for cross wind drift during the sequence. It only makes sense that we would carry over this practice for landings as well. I'm sure there are other ways or more approved ways of doing the same thing in full scale practice as you have passenger comfort and aircraft limitations to deal with. My biggest gripe with this whole thing is full scale pilots telling model pilots how to fly their airplanes applying full scale theory. IMO that would seriously handicap our models performance. What would happen if I approached you guys 25 years ago and claimed I could hover an airplane by it's prop like a helicopter? What if I showed up at the field with an airplane built a lightly as some of the 3D arfs are today? I'm thinking that neither would be readily accepted. Yet here we are.
    Of course it's true, I read it on the Internet.

  8. #108

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    RE: Tips to make you a Better Pilot:

    There's only one rule ...
    Don't crash.
    Sincerity ... Once you are able to fake that, there will be no stopping you.


  9. #109
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    RE: Tips to make you a Better Pilot:

    I'm very much agree with Top Gunn regarding crosswind landing because I've noticed them a lot on high energy performance aircraft such as scale aircraft and jets. But don't forget that Speedracerntrixie and sensei has their points also, speedracerntrixie has reliable source of infomation - his experience. Aside from that, I've seen guys here with good reputation even with some post seems like wrong but eventually brings light...

    This is what I see, scale aircraft specially jets are naturally stable but theirs are not. Other than that, they have lighter wing loading where they can land at lower speed. Jets are usually longer, has considerable amount of stabilizer area, shorter wings span, moslty are swept and use bigger amount of flaps on landing. Since it's high wing loading aircraft it requires speed in relation to the runway for safety and authority during landing...
    More than just sports, hobby and recreation, it’s technology…

  10. #110

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    RE: Tips to make you a Better Pilot:

    Al I'm not understanding how you are coming to the conclusion that if I'm wings level and holding rudder that I have to be turning. The rudder is simply used to hold position relitive to the runway. This is the same tecnique that is used to keep box depth when flying IMAC or pattern. Imagine flying a constant line 150 ft beyond the runway but you have 10 knots of wind in your face. How would you keep the airplane from drifting in towards you?
    If your wings are level and your rudder is not centered, then your plane is making a skidding turn in the direction in which you have the rudder deflected. This is not subject to argument. The plane will continue to yaw until the rudder is neutralized. You can fly a straight line in a crosswind by crabbing into the wind (though the nose of the plane will not be pointed in the direction it is flying). Or you can do it by slipping, but then the wings will not be level. You cannot do it by holding the rudder off center, because an off-center rudder induces yaw as long as it is off center. It doesn't somehow stop doing that just because the plane is where you want it to be. So unless you either return the rudder to neutral once you've achieved a good crab angle or counteract the yaw by dropping a wing, the yaw will continue: what would stop it? This isn't a matter of full-scale vs. models, it's basic stuff about what airplanes do.

    As I said before, I think we mean different things by "holding rudder." I think you mean using the rudder to change the plane's heading so it stays where you want it to be; that's crabbing. Which is fine, but I still haven't heard a reason why (considerations of making things look nice for pattern judges aside) it's preferable to changing your heading in the usual way.
    Al Gunn
    Ultra Sport Brotherhood No. 9

  11. #111
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    RE: Tips to make you a Better Pilot:

    ORIGINAL: 91zulu

    ORIGINAL: sensei

    ORIGINAL: speedracerntrixie

    Al I'm not understanding how you are coming to the conclusion that if I'm wings level and holding rudder that I have to be turning. The rudder is simply used to hold position relitive to the runway. This is the same tecnique that is used to keep box depth when flying IMAC or pattern. Imagine flying a constant line 150 ft beyond the runway but you have 10 knots of wind in your face. How would you keep the airplane from drifting in towards you?
    The only way I know of is to kick that rudder into the wind and carry that wing until it's time to straighten up and set it on the mains.

    Bob

    Rudder into the wind or aileron into the wind? I never heard when correcting for wind drift you push the rudder into the wind and aileron away to hold heading. Its aileron into the wind and rudder to hold heading. You want the low wing on the side which the wind is coming from. Don`t believe me there is a good show called Flying Wild Alaska. There are lots of footage of cross wind landings in C-207s C-208s C206s and others at cross winds in excess of 40+ knots. Go down load it from one of the torrent sites ( Extra Torrent ) and then spend a day looking at some highly skilled pilots, then come back and tell me if you see any of them holding rudder into the wind. But you have to look at the show first before you start arguing this point.
    Also if the rudder is NOT used for steering then all of you that is saying that go take your tail dragger out to the field place it at the end of the runway and take off with the rudder disconnected and use the aileron to hold the nose on the center line. And then post the video to prove that the rudder was not connected.
    I grew up in a family owning 4 full scale airplanes, 3 aerobatic homebuilt airplanes and 1 Wichita spam can, so I have spent my fair share of time flying and even barn storming in full scale airplanes, with that said I will tell you that comparing a full scales flight characteristics, especially heavy's to one of the R/C models in my videos is like comparing the generated inertia of a 50 ft' drop between a watermelon and peanut on impact. Did you not pay any attention to what I was doing on landings and flat circles in the videos?

    Bob
    Fly It Like You Stole It!!!

  12. #112

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    RE: Tips to make you a Better Pilot:


    ORIGINAL: speedracerntrixie

    As I have stated before, we are talking about MODEL airplanes here right? If you read back I have not advised anyone how to fly their full scale airplane. Reason for that is I am not a full scale pilot and recognise the differences between the two and just feel that I am not qualified to do so based on those differences. So as far as models go and to be specific someone who flys IMAC and pattern we would NEVER want to fly around with one wing low to compensate for wind drift. This would be giving up 2 points per manuver for not beginning and ending each manuver with wings level. The resolve is to use rudder only to compensate for cross wind drift during the sequence. It only makes sense that we would carry over this practice for landings as well. I'm sure there are other ways or more approved ways of doing the same thing in full scale practice as you have passenger comfort and aircraft limitations to deal with. My biggest gripe with this whole thing is full scale pilots telling model pilots how to fly their airplanes applying full scale theory. IMO that would seriously handicap our models performance. What would happen if I approached you guys 25 years ago and claimed I could hover an airplane by it's prop like a helicopter? What if I showed up at the field with an airplane built a lightly as some of the 3D arfs are today? I'm thinking that neither would be readily accepted. Yet here we are.
    The crab technique is also used for RC flying not just full scale. Basically the same technique used to control the full scale is used for our models. The trouble is LEARNING these maneuvers so that one can have many successful flights even when caught by a sudden gust of wind at take off or landing. The key is knowing what to do so that you don`t crash your plane. Maybe the 60% 3D plane could get away with aileron correction on take off from a sudden gust, do that with a 35 pound Hi wing loading T6 and see what happens. Folks have to first understand the 3D KITES is way over powered maybe 2 to 1 and light as cork. There fore the controls that they could get away with most cases will not wash with other planes like Jets , WW2 or WW1 warbirds and even some civilian planes like RVs and Bips. Do that 3D horsing the controls stuff and you are not going to have your bird for long. The 3D guys need to point this out to folks that are trying to learn, that is unless they don`t know better which I think may be the case from some of the stuff written here.
    I fly warbirds mostly 71" and up. In the 90s I had my experimenting with pattern , aerobatic, sport and civilian. I know for a fact they all fly different. So for those that went from trainer to 3D, please be careful with you advice. Like I said I have seen simple , just a bit heavily loaded planes beat guys that could hover a 60% Extra a foot off the ground.
    91-Zulu

  13. #113

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    RE: Tips to make you a Better Pilot:

    I also think we need to ask folks that ask these questions, better pilot to fly WHAT TYPE OF PLANE. Pick your type that you think you will most likely have many of, whether warbird, sport, civilian, jets or Bi-planes. They all fly different and some require more careful attention and a different technique than others. It is NOT the same for all of the types.
    91-Zulu

  14. #114
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    RE: Tips to make you a Better Pilot:


    ORIGINAL: 91zulu

    I also think we need to ask folks that ask these questions, better pilot to fly WHAT TYPE OF PLANE. Pick your type that you think you will most likely have many of, whether warbird, sport, civilian, jets or Bi-planes. They all fly different and some require more careful attention and a different technique than others. It is NOT the same for all of the types.
    I guess I will say it one more time, no matter what type of airplanes you fly, if you want to be a better pilot you must get in the stick time...

    Bob
    Fly It Like You Stole It!!!

  15. #115
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    RE: Tips to make you a Better Pilot:

    91 I do understand what you are saying however I have use the same technique on all the airplanes I fly which include 3D capable scale aerobatic, sport, warbird pylon and sailplane. Yes they react differently however I control them the same.
    Of course it's true, I read it on the Internet.

  16. #116

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    RE: Tips to make you a Better Pilot:


    ORIGINAL: sensei


    ORIGINAL: 91zulu

    I also think we need to ask folks that ask these questions, better pilot to fly WHAT TYPE OF PLANE. Pick your type that you think you will most likely have many of, whether warbird, sport, civilian, jets or Bi-planes. They all fly different and some require more careful attention and a different technique than others. It is NOT the same for all of the types.
    I guess I will say it one more time, no matter what type of airplanes you fly, if you want to be a better pilot you must get in the stick time...

    Bob

    Oh for sure you have to put in the stick time. That is why I keep emphasizing touch and goes should be used as a primary practice tool to become comfortable and competent. Then take it from there to your niche. But first you got to master the basics so you could become better at flying the plane rather than the plane flying you which is what I see quite often.
    Especially in aerobatics you see guys planes flying them all the time and they swear they are good. When you look at a McConville or a Somenzini all manoeuvrings looks deliberate not like the pilot is following along with the plane in other words the tail is wagging the dog.
    91-Zulu

  17. #117
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    RE: Tips to make you a Better Pilot:

    Practicing touch and goes(and all that goes with that)as the op says, is the way to go when learning.If you get real good at it you enjoy it a lot more and don't worry about losing it so often.Imac pilots i see have just as much trouble as the guy flying a 46ax trainer and i often wonder why.I liked the op's post simply because it's there to make you think.Most discussions i hear around the club are about new gadgets and techno wizardry for their latest plane,and they seem to go thru a lot of aeroplanes..rarely do you hear a good discussion about basic piloting techniques and you would think you would,after seeing that type of carnage,not to mention wasted time and money.I use a 46 size seagull decathlon with a saito 82 to fly 3 to 6 feet off the ground and practice turning every which way and all sorts of stuff that can take your fancy on the spur of the moment.It keeps you focused on the effects of control movements and teaches smooth flying and energy management..PLUS you sometimes clear the airspace in the immediate vicinity
    Watch out for the ground eh?

  18. #118
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    RE: Tips to make you a Better Pilot:

    When the plane is coming towards you...

    Push the aileron towards the LOW wing to level the wings...

    I heard this tip from my instructor on flight #3 and never wrong thumbed a plane since......

    31 years later... in a hobby shop - regarding helicopters...

    When Hovering Nose in (IE the helicopter pointing directly towards you)

    Push your stick towards the drift to STOP the drift....

    Best 2 pieces of advice I have had in this hobby...
    My biggest fear is when I die my wife will sell my planes for what I told her they cost.

  19. #119
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    RE: Tips to make you a Better Pilot:



    Additional words of wisdom I heard from my full size instructor...

    Aim for a thousand hours of experience...

    NOT one hour of experience a thousand times...

    My biggest fear is when I die my wife will sell my planes for what I told her they cost.

  20. #120

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    RE: Tips to make you a Better Pilot:

    This thread almost turned into a "who can land in the wind the best" session, or I can pee farther than you can.

    Some key things that helped me so much during my learning to be a better pilot was:

    1. Do as much research as you can and learn as much as possible.

    2. Choose what you really want to do as each person's advice is usually based on their "style" of flying and may not be acurate.

    3. Don't take one person's advice over the rest until you have proven it to be the best advice in your situation.

    4. Make sure you have a well balanced and mechanically trimmed out airplane, then get all radio trim correct, even the thrust for your style of flying makes a difference.

    5. Fly your aiplane enough to know every characteristic about it. I have seen pilots fly planes that folks would not think would do the things they can do with them because they have logged the stick time and know their airplane.

    6. Have some sort of plan even it is a plan to just burn up the sky having fun. It is like this, if you never use the rudder and don't have a plan to, you never will - get the point? Plan to do things it brings more fun into it.

    7. Don't let others discourage you about what you can do. After all they are not you and this is about you becoming a better pilot.

    8. Totally enjoy this hobby as it can give you loads and loads of fun and rewards.

    A side note for those interested - no you don't have to crash all the time, whoever said or teaches that is totally full of it and should think about what they are saying to fellow flyers. I just don't get why folks say you will crash, expect it to happen. Some say if you don't crash you are not flying and that is bull hocky too.

    I know guys that have flown thousands of times with minimal if any mis-haps. Yes, sometimes it happens by a freak accident - that is a given. I have flown over a thousand flights myself with hardly any mis-haps and at times I have been extremely agressive in my flying.

    One guy I know logs every flight and has over 1700 flights now and such a small amount of failures it is almost unreal. I have watched him fly often. His secrets? One thing is that he keeps his planes and equipment in tip top shape by replacing parts before they becomd potential failure points and doing good inspections. He is maticulous but it reduces his risk of crashing and is evident in his large amount of flights.

    I have learned much by observing his methods and I have reduced my failure rates by becoming more aware of problem areas. We can learn from others and we can also learn bad habits from others which usually lead to problems.

    Hope this is good info for someone out there[8D]

  21. #121
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    RE: Tips to make you a Better Pilot:


    ORIGINAL: Luchnia

    A side note for those interested - no you don't have to crash all the time, whoever said or teaches that is totally full of it and should think about what they are saying to fellow flyers. I just don't get why folks say you will crash, expect it to happen. Some say if you don't crash you are not flying and that is bull hocky too.

    I know guys that have flown thousands of times with minimal if any mis-haps. Yes, sometimes it happens by a freak accident - that is a given. I have flown over a thousand flights myself with hardly any mis-haps and at times I have been extremely agressive in my flying.

    One guy I know logs every flight and has over 1700 flights now and such a small amount of failures it is almost unreal. I have watched him fly often. His secrets? One thing is that he keeps his planes and equipment in tip top shape by replacing parts before they becomd potential failure points and doing good inspections. He is maticulous but it reduces his risk of crashing and is evident in his large amount of flights.
    I really like what you said above and agree completely..

    In 34 years of flying and well over 12,000 flights... my crashes are..

    1. Pilot error on first ever attempt to fly it alone... (joined a club the next week) 1978
    2. Radio interference 1979
    3. 1 Helicopter crash - pilot error while practising autorotations and getting cocky - 2010
    4. 1 Helicopter crash - selected the incorrect model memory and took off with roll control reversed - 2010
    5. 1 Helicopter crash - Servo Failure 2011.

    Not a single crash in a fixed wing RC plane in 33 since 1979 years and over 6000 flights.
    My biggest fear is when I die my wife will sell my planes for what I told her they cost.

  22. #122

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    RE: Tips to make you a Better Pilot:


    ORIGINAL: gene6029

    Agreed, what jester said! Find someone to mentor you( that knows what they are doing) or help you practice correctly. Practiceing your mistakes doesnt make you a better pilot.
    well said !

  23. #123
    Bob Pastorello's Avatar
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    RE: Tips to make you a Better Pilot:

    Great thread, and lots of interesting 1:1 v.s. RC discussions.  Rarely seen, I think, and good to get our heads thinking about all the variables.
    In my many years of both RC and FS, I have found my most successful coaching/teaching came when the pilot really "gets it"....The "IT" being - Maintain complete directional and positional control over the airplane to make it go where YOU want it to.
    Pick something - a circle, a traffic pattern, an approach, a departure, whatever - but "practice" maintaining total control during whatever it is.

    Oh.... and fly the RC plane as if YOU are in the cockpit.  Not outside on the ground.  But INSIDE, in the pilots' seat.  I guarantee significant improvement in your proper use of rudder during aerobatics, and mastery of the coming at you control issue....But you have to stick with it long enough to see it.

    Try it.  It's a mental conceptual picture, but it SURE makes a difference in being able to put that thing where you want it to be.
    "I learned long ago, never to wrestle with a pig. You get dirty, and besides, the pig likes it." - George Bernard Shaw

  24. #124
    sensei's Avatar
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    RE: Tips to make you a Better Pilot:

    *
    Fly It Like You Stole It!!!

  25. #125
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    RE: Tips to make you a Better Pilot:


    ORIGINAL: Luchnia

    This thread almost turned into a ''who can land in the wind the best'' session, or I can pee farther than you can.

    Some key things that helped me so much during my learning to be a better pilot was:

    1. Do as much research as you can and learn as much as possible.

    2. Choose what you really want to do as each person's advice is usually based on their ''style'' of flying and may not be acurate.

    3. Don't take one person's advice over the rest until you have proven it to be the best advice in your situation.

    4. Make sure you have a well balanced and mechanically trimmed out airplane, then get all radio trim correct, even the thrust for your style of flying makes a difference.

    5. Fly your aiplane enough to know every characteristic about it. I have seen pilots fly planes that folks would not think would do the things they can do with them because they have logged the stick time and know their airplane.

    6. Have some sort of plan even it is a plan to just burn up the sky having fun. It is like this, if you never use the rudder and don't have a plan to, you never will - get the point? Plan to do things it brings more fun into it.

    7. Don't let others discourage you about what you can do. After all they are not you and this is about you becoming a better pilot.

    8. Totally enjoy this hobby as it can give you loads and loads of fun and rewards.

    A side note for those interested - no you don't have to crash all the time, whoever said or teaches that is totally full of it and should think about what they are saying to fellow flyers. I just don't get why folks say you will crash, expect it to happen. Some say if you don't crash you are not flying and that is bull hocky too.

    I know guys that have flown thousands of times with minimal if any mis-haps. Yes, sometimes it happens by a freak accident - that is a given. I have flown over a thousand flights myself with hardly any mis-haps and at times I have been extremely agressive in my flying.

    One guy I know logs every flight and has over 1700 flights now and such a small amount of failures it is almost unreal. I have watched him fly often. His secrets? One thing is that he keeps his planes and equipment in tip top shape by replacing parts before they becomd potential failure points and doing good inspections. He is maticulous but it reduces his risk of crashing and is evident in his large amount of flights.

    I have learned much by observing his methods and I have reduced my failure rates by becoming more aware of problem areas. We can learn from others and we can also learn bad habits from others which usually lead to problems.

    Hope this is good info for someone out there[8D]
    Some key things that helped me so much during my learning to be a better pilot was:

    So after just 3 short years of flying R/C your completely accomplished and done learning? I think people wanting good advice in these forums should always go into the members profiles giving advice and see what they have been doing over the years. Far to many member's giving advice are more so keyboard experienced than anything else. You must always consider the source.

    Bob
    Fly It Like You Stole It!!!


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