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What's the best paint to use over Solartex??

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Old 07-28-2014, 09:27 AM
  #1
Marty79
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Default What's the best paint to use over Solartex??

Hey Guys, Building an Ace Bingo and I am planning on covering it with solartex. I would like to use a dark red or maroon paint to do the trim and the plastic parts. Any Ideas???

Thanks,

David
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Old 07-28-2014, 11:16 AM
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Any one you want. I prefer latex but you can pretty much use whatever you like. When in doubt test some scrap.
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Old 07-29-2014, 03:45 AM
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Depends on what you are powering it with, glow or gasoline or electric. If glow powered, make sure to use a paint that is fuel proof for alcohol and/or nitro methane, if gasoline you have a bit more choices as most paints will hold up under gasoline if left to dry/cure long enough. One of the better choices, although expensive, is KlassKote. That is an epoxy paint that is amazingly durable under all conditions and is easy to apply. You can either brush it on or spray it if you know the necessary info to spray.

Last edited by Rodney; 08-22-2014 at 10:57 AM. Reason: Correct spelling of Klasscote
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Old 07-29-2014, 03:59 AM
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I've used oil-based Rustoleum from rattle cans and it went on well and stayed down.
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Old 07-29-2014, 07:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rodney View Post
Depends on what you are powering it with, glow or gasoline or electric. If glow powered, make sure to use a paint that is fuel proof for alcohol and/or nitro methane, if gasoline you have a bit more choices as most paints will hold up under gasoline if left to dry/cure long enough. One of the better choices, although expensive, is GlassKote. That is an epoxy paint that is amazingly durable under all conditions and is easy to apply. You can either brush it on or spray it if you know the necessary info to spray.
I plan on using a gas engine. I have been thinking of Rustolium or maybe Krylon.
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Old 07-29-2014, 12:30 PM
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Just a small note the epoxy paint is called klasskote, and if you are using gas you can use any paint and use a clear coat of polyurethane on top. Latex will get messy if you spill gas directly on it.
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Old 07-30-2014, 04:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marty79 View Post
I plan on using a gas engine. I have been thinking of Rustolium or maybe Krylon.
Rustoleum aerosols spray much better than Krylon, and usually provide a better looking finish.

If you go with aerosol cans, buy one of those adapters that mount on the can, allowing you to spray like you are using a gun. They cost little, and save your "trigger finger" a lot of agony.
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Old 08-03-2014, 07:20 AM
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I use nothing but Latex, as the choice of colors is so much larger and you can get a color match if you need it. I use an air brush to spray it on and then after it dries for a week or so, I clear coat it to make it fuel proof. I buy my paint at The Home Depot. They have these little sample containers that they will mix any color for $3.99. Good Luck, Dave
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Old 08-03-2014, 01:52 PM
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Dave, what do you use for a clear coat?
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Old 08-21-2014, 12:14 PM
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I tested Krylon paint with gasoline. The results showed that gasoline and Krylon are not a good solution at all. You could completely wash the paint off of a surface with gasoline.
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Old 08-21-2014, 04:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OldScaleGuy View Post
I tested Krylon paint with gasoline. The results showed that gasoline and Krylon are not a good solution at all. You could completely wash the paint off of a surface with gasoline.
I had the same result. Krylon is good for electrics only, in my opinion.
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Old 08-22-2014, 06:38 AM
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How long did you let it cure? Krylon and Rustoleum take a while to reach full hardness and chemical resistance. If it still has a wet paint smell to it (which it will even after 4-5 days) it's not fully cured.
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Old 08-22-2014, 07:36 AM
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Good point. It has been a good long time ago but i think i tested it one day later. Will try it again and wait for full cure.
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Old 08-23-2014, 06:12 PM
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I think I got it from Nelson's Paint. It is good up to 15 per cent glow fuel. I have not had any issues with it. Good Luck, Dave
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Old 08-24-2014, 06:09 PM
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Nelson's is the Systems 3 water based poly.
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Old 08-25-2014, 02:44 AM
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Why not use the latex as a base coat and use an automotive two part clear coat for your top coat, if you want it to be glossy then use as packaged, if you want it to to be satin or flat, just add the compound they sell for that purpose and spray.

Bob
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Old 08-25-2014, 05:45 AM
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There are two reasons not to do that. First is cost, since automotive clear coats don't usually come in pint cans. Second is weight. A base/clear finish is usually going to weigh more than a single coat finish. Of course, if you want a wet look glossy finish you'll have to do it that way, but most guys who cover with fabric don't. And, of course, there can be worries about paint compatibility as some solvents in auto clear coats can dissolve the latex paint underneath.
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Old 08-26-2014, 03:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jester_s1 View Post
There are two reasons not to do that. First is cost, since automotive clear coats don't usually come in pint cans. Second is weight. A base/clear finish is usually going to weigh more than a single coat finish. Of course, if you want a wet look glossy finish you'll have to do it that way, but most guys who cover with fabric don't. And, of course, there can be worries about paint compatibility as some solvents in auto clear coats can dissolve the latex paint underneath.
Cost is not a reason because the clear properly stored will last for years and can be used on many airplanes making it affordable in the long run. The weight is no heavier than Systems 3, Nelson, or Klasskote, in all cases if you want it light then knowledge and application is everything, and personally I have never seen automotive sprayed on urethane attack dry latex.

I did not include Krylon because it is just not a player in standing up short or long term to gas or fuel. As I also already mentioned the automotive clear can have a glossy, satin, or a flat finish just by adding the compound to your spray cup as you go. It is funny that full scale guys do their best to get rid of the cloth look and modelers just the opposite.

Bob

Last edited by sensei; 08-26-2014 at 07:06 AM.
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Old 08-26-2014, 03:53 AM
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Well sure, if you build half a dozen planes a year buying a quart of automotive clear will make sense. But many of us don't even do a build every year, so that quart of clear becomes a one plane investment. The reason I said that it's heavier is that you're spraying 2 coats instead of one.
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Old 08-27-2014, 07:20 PM
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IMO paint is like jewelry, you get what you,pay for. In order to be fuel proof the paint has to be catalized. Even the auto clear over latex is not going to be 100% fuel proof. Sooner or later fuel is going to creep in between the paint and the clear around edges.

That being said it all depends on how much you value your airplane. As for Bob and many more of us we don't mind spending the extra cash knowing that our airplane that we plan to have for years will look great and stand the test of time. For those on a budget, check into the Spray Max line of products. The cans are about 20.00 each so not really much more expensive then Lusterkote. Available is base/clear, single stage and primer. All fuel proof except the base. The base is very fuel resistant after being cleared.
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