Register

If this is your first visit, please click the Sign Up now button to begin the process of creating your account so you can begin posting on our forums! The Sign Up process will only take up about a minute of two of your time.

Results 1 to 24 of 24

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Monterey, TN
    Posts
    1,080
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    Drilling wheel hubs out?

    Got a new set of 5 1/2" Dubro wheels that go on 1/4" axles. Drilled them to 1/4" but they're too tight. Whats the ideal next size drill up to get them right? I don't want any excess 'slop'. Thanks, Bill
    If I die, and I have the most toys, what do I win?

  2. #2
    bkdavy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    FrederickMD
    Posts
    2,113
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: Drilling wheel hubs out?

    Roll up a piece of sandpaper, put it through the hole, and rotate the wheel around the paper. You'll take off just enough to fit the axle.

    Brad

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    East Cobb County, GA
    Posts
    1,390
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: Drilling wheel hubs out?

    In order of increasing size,
    6.5mm, F, G, and 17/64".

    You _might_ have the last one.

    Otherwise, sand as advised above.
    Cheers,
    Fred McClellan

  4. #4
    TLH101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Corpus Christi, TX
    Posts
    6,500
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: Drilling wheel hubs out?

    Try using a prop ream in the correct size. I have found that when drilling wheels, the hole always seems to shrink just a touch after drilling. I think maybe heat build up causes it. Just drill it like you normally would, then run your prop ream through, and you will have a nice fit that does not bind or wobble.
    Terry
    "Old Fart" in training. (not to be an R/Cer, but to be an "Old Fart")
    P-39 Brotherhood # 6
    P-38 Brotherhood #69

  5. #5
    Moderator da Rock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Near Pfafftown NC
    Posts
    11,207
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: Drilling wheel hubs out?

    If you have a solid mount for your drill, move the wheel up and down the turning bit a couple of passes.
    Good flying wit ya today

  6. #6
    Moderator da Rock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Near Pfafftown NC
    Posts
    11,207
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: Drilling wheel hubs out?

    You know, I bet a bunch of you think this is overkill but.........

    Years ago I lived in a big town. There were a couple of industrial supply houses. They looked to me like big NAPA stores only they sold lathes, mills, etc, and all manner of bits and machine shop supplies etc. I was trying to make my own pistons at the time and needed accurate holes. Reamers are the answer, not drills. Those supply houses sold every size imaginable. I decided to buy a couple in sizes that would help those simple tasks, like getting accurate wheel/axle holes.

    Since I've never been real happy with running a drill bit into those plastic wheels, it's almost impossible to get an accurate hole, I've been happy as a fly on a pig's lips to sit and turn that "expensive" reamer by hand.

    I've not looked, but I bet there is at least one internet site for reamers, real "industrial strength" ones. Mine weren't much more expensive than the drill bits you see on the wall at Home Depot or Lowes Home Improvement.
    Good flying wit ya today

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Monterey, TN
    Posts
    1,080
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: Drilling wheel hubs out?

    Your right about the reamers. Anything, I believe, properly machined with a 'round' hole is reamed. I will check my prop reamer-hadn't thought about that! I did fiddle last nite on one with the sandpaper, and it is working-but man, is that tedious. Personally, I'm one who normally needs instant gratification! Guess I would need the 'F' reamer, I have a few letter drills in the box, wish I had a whole set.
    If I die, and I have the most toys, what do I win?

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Mt. Morris, MI
    Posts
    1,151
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: Drilling wheel hubs out?

    The reamers Darock is talking about are sold as oversize dimentional reamers. You'll find the 1/4" range marked as .248, .249, .2495, .250 .2505 .251, .252 etc. You can find them for fractional or metric sizes. Try www.enco.com for individual pieces or whole sets.
    Rule #1: Always know when to get out of Dodge.
    Rule #2: Always know HOW to get out of Dodge.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    East Cobb County, GA
    Posts
    1,390
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: Drilling wheel hubs out?


    ORIGINAL: TLH101
    Try using a prop ream in the correct size. I have found that when drilling wheels, the hole always seems to shrink just a touch after drilling.
    Most drills aren't really sharp enough to cut the plastic precisely, and even though material is indeed removed during drilling, the plastic also deforms a bit to accomodate the drill bit, resulting in a hole that is smaller than would have been made in metal.

    Try drilling and tapping UHMW (Ultra High Molecular Weight) plastic some time. No matter how many times you run a tap through the threads, the threads will be very tight when trying to run in a machine screw. BTDT. Next time I need tapped holes in UHMW I'll use threaded inserts.
    Cheers,
    Fred McClellan

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Monterey, TN
    Posts
    1,080
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: Drilling wheel hubs out?

    Well, thanks for the tips guys. Fred: you're right about drilling that plastic! I wound up using the prop reamer and rolled up sandpaper and got a nice smooth fit. The sandpaper method took a loooong time, and quite boring, but, it was do something, or watch 'Lifetime' movies with the wife. Those are some of the most boring movies ever made! They could be used for interrogating prisoners: "Talk or you watch 3 Lifetime movies in a row!"
    If I die, and I have the most toys, what do I win?

  11. #11

    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Ivyland, PA
    Posts
    2,085
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: Drilling wheel hubs out?

    I finally broke down and bought a set of lettered and numbered drills to add to my fractional inch drills. The extra sizes have been handy many times. They are not usually found in comsumer hardware stores - you need to get them mailorder or from an industrial supply place. Watch out for low-quality imports.
    Glow Head #6, UltraSport #70

  12. #12

    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Toledo, OH
    Posts
    71
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: Drilling wheel hubs out?

    I've drilled an oversized hole and used heat shrink tubing on the axle
    Worked well
    Pete

  13. #13

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Santo, TX
    Posts
    406
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: Drilling wheel hubs out?

    Or drill it oversize and shim it with a brass tube from K&S -Jim

  14. #14
    MinnFlyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Willmar, MN
    Posts
    28,519
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: Drilling wheel hubs out?

    What I will often do is to glue a piece of sandpaper to a dowel - in this case, if the hole is 1/4" you could use a 1/8" dowel (or maybe a 3/16" dowel with a shorter piece of sandpaper)

    Glue one edge of the sandpaper to the dowel, then wrap it around the dowel. Put the dowel in a drill, insert it into the hole and the centrifugal force will push the sandpaper against the hole.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Zx71185.jpg 
Views:	81 
Size:	47.4 KB 
ID:	376834  
    Mike B. AMA# 42400 www.gettingairborne.com
    Ultra Sport Brotherhood #2 - Waco Brother #188 - Cub Brother #2

    \"Those are my principles. If you don’t like them, I have others.\" - Groucho Marx

  15. #15
    CCRC1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Waldorf, MD
    Posts
    1,109
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: Drilling wheel hubs out?

    wsmalley,
    I have a suggestion you may want to look at. I am not fond of the plastic wheel running on a steel axle and bearing the load of the airplane. Every one that I have ever had like that ended up wearing prematurely. I would rather drill the wheel to accept a nylon or bronze bushing. I found some nice smaller size nylon flanged bushings from SIG, and for the larger sizes, hit your LHS in the RC car section. Most of the time bushings are replaced in RC cars with bearings so they are fairly easy to get. Finding some with an ID. of 1/4" shouldn't be to hard. You may even get lucky and find some flanged bearings with that ID.

  16. #16
    Moderator da Rock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Near Pfafftown NC
    Posts
    11,207
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: Drilling wheel hubs out?

    Brass bushings?

    The K&S tubing is sized so that each tube size fits rather well into the next size larger. It's quite easy to use for a fixed bearing on the axle, or fixed bearing in the wheel, or both. And since drill sizes match up as well, it's easy to create an appropriate sized hole in the wheels.

    The only very slight problem I ever ran into using that tubing as wheel bearings was on a CL rat racer that lived far longer than those suckers usually do. The high nitro fuel and the way it's slopped around a rat racer must have kept the wheel (only had one) wet every time we flew it. And brass is not a good metal to use around fuel. (Which is why I'm constantly amazed that most fuel tanks still are sold with brass clunks and tubing.) And one day I noticed the tire was showing grey-green stains. It still turned great, but it was obvious the brass was reacting to the fuel baths. (Have you ever opened up a really old fuel tank and looked at the brass inside?)
    Good flying wit ya today

  17. #17

    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Rib Lake, WI
    Posts
    449
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback
    I realize this thread is very old, but the advice was spot on. I used the prop reamer and got 1/4 inch.

    I had used a 6.5mm drill bit, that is .2559, but the hole was still so tight you could not push the axle in.

    Thanks to all.

  18. #18
    Leroy Gardner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Coeurd'Alene, ID
    Posts
    1,548
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback
    An F letter bit will do it, it's used to drill holes for 1/4" rivets so you can get the rivet in them and buck um. Works great on hubs as well.

    Leroy
    Leroy Tiger Club # 53, TF 1/5th P-51 mustang
    Eagle 2 11, bashed Tiger 60, Spacewalker 11 1/4 scale
    P-51 Mustang Brotherhood #28, Sig Brotherhood #12
    If it works for you there is still a wrong way

  19. #19

    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    SorrentoBritish Columbia, CANADA
    Posts
    1,720
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback
    It also helps to put your wheels in the freezer for a little while first .. then I go up a size in bits .. I have a set of number bits and I use them .. Its not a big deal if there is a little bit of play as long as its not too much .. It will allow room for a bit off grease or oil .
    Ken , Biker BC Cub Brother #6 Ultra Sport Brother # 100 Tiger Club # 7 Pulse Brother # 1 Sig Brother # 58 Top Flight Brother # 9

  20. #20

    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    pine bluffs, WY
    Posts
    472
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback
    + 1 bk & minnflyer

  21. #21
    You might try a 17/64 drill in a drill press turning as slowly as possible to prevent heat building up

  22. #22

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Spring Hill, FL
    Posts
    4,700
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback
    I drill for a brass tube that fits the axle. Then I can press the tube in place and the clearance is perfect.

    Generally when you need to drill holes that become bearing surfaces you're going to need number and letter drills. Fractional drills will never be the exact right size.
    Work is what I do for the love of it. A job is how I pay for it.
    Please visit AirfieldModels.com

  23. #23
    sensei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    SAN ANTONIO, TX
    Posts
    2,294
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback
    F drill = close fit for a 1/4 dia axle.
    H drill = free fit for a 1/4" dia. axle.

    Bob
    Fly It Like You Stole It!!!

  24. #24
    Villa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Wilson, NC,
    Posts
    2,048
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback
    Sometimes, if the hole just needs to be a little larger, I will use a slightly larger drill, and force it thru the hole, but in reverse direction. Sometimes this works OK.


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:08 AM.

SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.