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what type of solder to use

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Old 02-10-2009, 11:22 PM
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coydog
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Default what type of solder to use

hi ya fella's what type of solder would be used to join 256 wire to a 256 brass threded coupler? I tried rosin core flux and solder it join's the two but i don't trust the joint i have been told that silver bearing is best on this type of applacation i realy don't want to buy some if it's not going to work if it is the best way to go no problem i'll pick some up. [sm=confused.gif]
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Old 02-10-2009, 11:32 PM
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Default RE: what type of solder to use

Yes, silver solder is what you want. It usually comes with the correct type of flux. It's quite a bit stronger than regular solder.
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Old 02-11-2009, 09:42 AM
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Default RE: what type of solder to use

Definately silver "bearing" solder such as Stay Brite is what you need for your application. True silver solder is not needed with what you are doing and involves different materials and process.

http://www3.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin...&I=LXFS75&P=ML
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Old 02-11-2009, 11:20 AM
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Default RE: what type of solder to use

I second the Stay Brite. Clean the parts well, apply the flux and it fows great and is very strong.
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Old 02-11-2009, 12:18 PM
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Default RE: what type of solder to use

The Staybrite will work very well for your installation; however, the use of electrical solder (plane old 60/40) also is perfectly useable and will be more than adequate strength for that application if properly done. I use the electrical solder for both 2-56 and 4-40 joints and can not physically pull them apart.
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Old 02-11-2009, 01:24 PM
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Default RE: what type of solder to use

Electronics solder, rosin core, will work. However, it needs extra flux pre-added to the part.

The StayBrite silver solder is the bomb, though! It works perfect, holds together metals that otherwise you would not be able to solder, and you can use a soldering iron to work it and you do not need a flame torch.
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Old 02-11-2009, 01:33 PM
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Default RE: what type of solder to use

Unless you are experienced with resin core solder for mechanical joints, i strongly advise against even trying it, especially if what you are setting up is for a control surface. You will be asking for disaster. Use the Stay Brite and you will not be sorry,,, cheap insurance. Kmot is right a regular (good) soldering iron in the 120-140 watt range will be fine. A high heat flame torch type is required for true silver soldering, not the case here.
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Old 02-11-2009, 05:29 PM
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Default RE: what type of solder to use

You can't believe everything you read here.

I have been modeling for over 35 years, and have used 60/40 rosin core solder on large and small planes, and have never had a failure. The silver solder is kind of overkill for a 2-56 link.

Greg
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Old 02-12-2009, 12:25 AM
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Default RE: what type of solder to use

I agree with OldRookie

With: http://www.tooltopia.com/index.asp?P...OD&ProdID=8183

With this gun, you can solder up to large diameter landing gear wire. (Save the inside wheel collar and solder on a flat washer instead).

Remember to thoroughly degrease the parts being joined . Alcohol with a clean rag, and a new pipe cleaner dipped in alcohol for inside of parts. Then...scuff up the surfaces with clean, dry sandpaper. Wipe clean again. Be careful how you handle the parts after cleaning, for the oil from your skin/fingers will compromise joint integrity.

Next is heat. Plenty of it! Heat the parts so that they (the parts) themselves melt the solder. Quick(and careful) wipe of the completed connection with a clean rag followed by a close inspection with a magnifying eyepiece. Go Fly!
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Old 02-12-2009, 08:40 AM
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Default RE: what type of solder to use

Quote:
ORIGINAL: OldRookie

You can't believe everything you read here.

I have been modeling for over 35 years, and have used 60/40 rosin core solder on large and small planes, and have never had a failure. The silver solder is kind of overkill for a 2-56 link.

Greg
You got that right.....

You need to do what works best for you. All i am providing is my experience over 29 years of doing a lot of soldering; electrical and mechanical including brazing/true silver soldering. They each have their own place.
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Old 02-12-2009, 09:53 AM
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Default RE: what type of solder to use

Hello,

I am with the last three posts:

I use 60/40 solder.
First I solder both parts (previously cleened) with very little solder, just to keep them together. Then I wrap the join with thin copper wire and solder it definitely.

I use it for linkage, landing gears and cabane struts. I have never experienced any failure.

Marian
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Old 02-12-2009, 10:48 AM
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Default RE: what type of solder to use

Please review this article. You fella's in doubt, this may help. All i did was a Google search so you can do that too if this does not convince you there is risk using resin core solder for a mechanical joint. Why take the risk when risk can be eliminated or at least greatly reduced by a few simple measures and using the correct materials with the right process. It is almost funny,,,, but not quite, as i would hate to see someone that is not very experienced loose that nice model. http://www.gregorie.org/freeflight/s...soldering.html
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Old 02-12-2009, 10:56 AM
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Default RE: what type of solder to use

I agree with the guys using 60/40 solder. I've used it for some 40+ years on both 2-56 and 4-40 hardware with never a failure and lots of this has been on overpowered 1/4 scale planes. Just make sure you have the joints clean, clean, clean and use flux with adequate heat and you will have no problems or failures. Sure, the Staybrite works fine and if makes you feel better, use it. If you just want adequate strength and less cost, go with the 60/40 for that purpose.
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Old 02-12-2009, 10:57 AM
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Default RE: what type of solder to use

Hi!
Agree! Using ordinary sweet solder is just perfect for our modeling use. A 50W Weller soldering iron is what I have used for the last 35 years and is perfect for soldering just about anything from 6mm piano landing gear wire to delicate electronic devices as it has interchangeable soldering tips (iron plated).
Stay-Brite sweet silver solder is best/strongest of all sweet solders though, but remember the acid! It is making steel rust in no time and it's not for soldering electronic things!
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Old 02-12-2009, 11:22 AM
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Default RE: what type of solder to use

You can add some light weight oil to the joint AFTER soldering with Stay Brite to preclude the rust. The flux is what causes the rust, it is a very strong cleaner and eliminates all the oil on the surface.
Good luck to you guys using electrical solder on mechanical joints, it will bite you right in the bunners some day when you least expect it.....
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Old 02-12-2009, 12:25 PM
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Default RE: what type of solder to use

http://www.gregorie.org/freeflight/s...soldering.html :

The idea with wire to wire joints is that the (copper) binding wire provides the strength while the solder merely forms a matrix that locks everything together. The binding should be tight before you solder that join. If you can only see the solder and not the binding, theres too much solder on the joint; the ideal is that just enough solder to wet everything involved in the joint is used.

I personally do not thrust joint without wire in high vibration (all glow airplanes) conditions.
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Old 02-12-2009, 12:37 PM
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Default RE: what type of solder to use

If you had included a picture of your solder joint I could tell you if it was good or not.
All that you need to achieve is for the solder to 'wet' onto both pieces that you are soldering.
If the solder has 'wetted' onto the steel then the electrical solder is plenty strong. If the solder is just a blob sitting on the steel then the solder joint will fail because the solder did not actually bond to the steel.
If the rod is plated the electrical solder should easily 'wet' onto it, if it is a hardened unplated rod , you can solder it with 63/37 or 60/40 electrical solder but it is easier (especially for a novice) to use the Stay-Bright solder kit.
Its not so much the solder that makes the difference as the flux that comes in the 'kit'.
The flux that is included in the 'kit' is an acid and is much more aggressive than the electrical resin flux.
If the rod is not plated ... clean the end that will be soldered with sand paper until all of the quenching oil is removed, the steel should be shiny metal vs black.
Getting rid of that oil is key to getting the solder to wet to the steel.
Just use your regular soldering iron along with the flux that comes with the Stay-Bright and it should be as easy to solder as copper wire.
Someone mentioned rust earlier... you need to clean the soldered area with alcohol and then with water, the flux is acid and if not cleaned off will cause corrosion.
If you clean off the flux rust should not be an issue.
Do not use the Stay-Bright flux on copper wire, it will corrode it.
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Old 02-12-2009, 01:03 PM
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Default RE: what type of solder to use

Hello Charlie,

Pictures of my solder joints are in post Nr. 10.
What is your opinion?
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Old 02-12-2009, 08:26 PM
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Default RE: what type of solder to use

Thanks guys sprung for the sta-brite worked like a champ also sprung for a new iron all is good in planeville now. thanks
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Old 02-17-2009, 09:05 PM
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Default RE: what type of solder to use


Quote:
ORIGINAL: Marian

Hello Charlie,

Pictures of my solder joints are in post Nr. 10.
What is your opinion?
The solder looks real nice.
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Old 02-17-2009, 11:09 PM
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Default RE: what type of solder to use


Quote:
ORIGINAL: jaka

Hi!
Agree! Using ordinary sweet solder is just perfect for our modeling use. A 50W Weller soldering iron is what have used for the last 35 years and is just perfect for soldering jsut about anything from 6mmpiano landing gears to delicate electronic devices as it has interchangeable soldering tips (iron plated).
Stay-Brite sweet silver solder is best/strongest of all sweet solders though , but remember the acid! It is making steel rust in no time!

Man You had to think WAY out of the box to design that fuel tank. Nice.

Bill
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Old 02-19-2009, 11:33 AM
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Default RE: what type of solder to use

Hi!
The problem was the limited space behind the firewall on my Marutaka DC-3 as both the electric retracts (big 90mm wheels) and fuel tank had to fit.The only option I had was to custom make a steel tank (from 0,3mm K&S tin plate) that fitted tight against both the engine cowl and the firewall.
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Old 02-23-2009, 09:04 AM
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Default RE: what type of solder to use

First rule of soldering:clean,second:clean.Do not touch area to be soldered.I have a soldering flux that is for stainless steel.It will stick about anything.It is acid and VERY corrosive.When using any type of acid flux or acid core solder ALWAYS nutralize with baking soda and water.Dry ,then oil or WD.
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