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Ultra Stick Lite 120 twin

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Old 11-26-2005, 06:18 PM
  #1  
4 stroken ron
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Default Ultra Stick Lite 120 twin

I saw these pics right here on "good ole" RCU.
They are by somebody called "ExperimentalAviator"
This is really nice. I hope he comes on here and tells us about it.
Ron
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Old 11-30-2005, 06:09 PM
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Default RE: Ultra Stick Lite 120 twin

Ron,

What would you like to know about my H9 Twin Stick Conversion?

Mike
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Old 11-30-2005, 06:32 PM
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4 stroken ron
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Default RE: Ultra Stick Lite 120 twin

I am real impressed with the plane. Do you have more photos? How does it fly? What size are those motors? Do you use the CROW function? Just stuff like that. I have one of those I have been flying with a SAITO 180. I use the CROW and really like it.
I think it is a great airplane.
Thanks
Ron
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Old 11-30-2005, 07:01 PM
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Default RE: Ultra Stick Lite 120 twin

I'm not into 3-D flying and don't set up my models for that type of flying.

My Twin Stick flies like a heavy trainer, but it handles heavy winds better than any model that I'm currently flying. That might be due to its small side profile. The flaps make a big difference in the landing speed and short landing distance. I have my flaps set up for 25 and 45 degrees of throw, and use both settings depending on the wind conditions.

Engines are Saito 72's with stock mufflers. Dual elevator servos and the rudder servo are located in the tail area of the fuselage. This worked to my advantage since I needed all the tail weight that I could get.

My original post after the maiden flight is detailed. If I can find it I will post the link.

I have a lot of construction pictures, but don't know where to post these.

Thanks for the positive comments on my Twin Stick. It's been a real joy to fly, especially since it hasn't required any major adjustments since the maiden flight, and I haven't touched the Saito needle valves in over twenty flights.

Mike
__________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ ____________________

My original post is below.
__________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ ____________________

The kit bashed H9 Twin Ultra Stick Light was test flown today. Made four flights totaling 40 minutes of air time, and the two Saito 72's sound great while in sync. First flight required one click of right aileron trim and four clicks of up elevator trim. Tracking was straight as an arrow.

The Twin came out heavier than planned at 15.80 lb. empty; 17.80 lb. with full fuel. The APC 13 x 6 props at 10,300 RPM produce about 8.5 lb. of thrust, so the performance is very good; obviously not spectacular, but more than satisfactory. Aerobatic performance is very good, and the tumbling maneuvers are quite interesting to see and hear with the two engines. Inverted flight requires the slightest amount of down stick .

With flaps down at 45 degrees the twin will slow down to a crawl, but the flaps are not needed for normal landings. With the engines at idle the twin slows down rapidly, requiring some power for a "normal" final approach, or the approach must be high and steep if the engines are at idle.

Specs: Saito 72's, APC 13 x 6 props, 2.5" GP spinners, 16 oz. Dubro fuel tanks and Dubro tail wheel, Cline Fuel Controllers, donated wheel pants, Hitec and Airtronic servos, Airtronic Rx, MPI heavy duty switch with LED light s, 6V 1700 mAh Rx battery, Sullivan tail wheel unit, Dave Brown pushrods on the tail. Extra graphics by Bill Fulmer at www.customcutgrafix.com.

The wing center section has been reinforced with two layers of staggered 3.2 oz Satin Weave E-glass and epoxy laminating resin. The fiberglass nose cone was made off a male plug, and the cowlings were made from 3/32" balsa wood and fiberglassed inside and out with hardpoints at the screw locations. The horizontal tail and elevators were sheeted top and bottom with 1/16" balsa for extra stiffness. The rudder was lengthened to allow for the Sullivan tail wheel unit. Two elevator servos and one rudder servo were used, and relocated to the tail area of the fuselage. Of interesting note, the weight of the wing is 10.40 lb. and the fuselage is 5.40 lb.

With the batteries and Rx unit located at the rear of the fuselage/wing area, no extra weight was needed for balance. Empty C.G. is 31%, and with full fuel the C.G. is 27%.


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Old 12-01-2005, 08:48 AM
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Default RE: Ultra Stick Lite 120 twin

Mike,
Beautiful work & a great idea. I have a US .120 H (as in Heavy or pre Lite). I have been thinking
about selling it as I am considering building a full size & I will need the space & will need to lessen
my distractions. But, in event that I can't sell it readily, I might consider applying your mods to it.
Could you post or email a few pics of your engine nacelles. Their construction & mounting to the
wing detail would be most helpful.
Thanks in advance.

Johnny C!
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Old 12-03-2005, 09:31 PM
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Default RE: Ultra Stick Lite 120 twin

Hey Johnnie C,

Is that a Thorp T-18 on your info? Can't quite make it out. I'll post some pictures that might help.

Ron, hope these help you out too.

The nacells are made out of 1/8" quality plywood and the outside dimensions are 3.45". As I remember the firewalls were made from two layers of 3/16" plywood and they are dowel pinned to the sides of the nacells. All corners inside the nacells had 5/16" triangular stock to tie everything together and then a complete epoxy coat. Nacells were built to hold Dubro 16 oz. tanks with room for 1/4" foam padding all around.

I cut airfoiled pieces out of hard balsa to fill the area between the exposed ribs in the "D" section and the cut-out for the nacells. I installed a piece of 1/8" plywood between the top and bottom spars to help tie everything together and give the nacell more gluing area. Nacells are installed in the wing with plenty of epoxy.

Because of my design and the fact that I inverted the engines, I had to use Cline Fuel Controllers to keep the engines from flooding. But, from this experience, I now use Cline's on everything I fly. They keep all of my engines running consistent, and with them it is rare that I have to touch the needle valve settings. That was not the case beforehand.

Let me know if you need any more pictures or information.

Mike
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Old 12-05-2005, 09:03 AM
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Default RE: Ultra Stick Lite 120 twin

Mike,
Yes, that's a T-18 that was built & flown by a good friend here in my area.
Jim was in a serious accident test flying a light experimental. He lost a leg
below the knee, but he says he will fly the Thorpe again & believe him.
I took that pic on our way to breakfast one day a few years ago.
I like the simplicity of your motor mount boxes. I have been slowly working
on bashing a crashed Dazzler ARF into a twin for a while. It's been slow
because it's a back burner project. My concern the wing structure is a little
weak where I need to put my nacelles, but your box method sort of adresses
that. Great food for thought. Thanks for the pics!

Johnny C!
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Old 12-05-2005, 10:40 AM
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4 stroken ron
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Default RE: Ultra Stick Lite 120 twin

Mike: that is really nice work. The pictures help a lot in planning my project. I think I can see bass tubing over the wing mount dowels. I had to do that to mine as the dowels were always working loose. Thinking about wing dowels, on a twin such as this. Seems like that area is going to see a lot more stress. both in the dowel mounting and the bulkhead.
I have a pair of Saito 56s laying here, waiting, I had thought about getting a 40 sized Ultra Stick. but now I am considering a 60 size. Or, I might go back to orginal plan of building a SPAD type stick.
I had also considered a Cedar Hobbies Twin Stick, but they are completely out of twin sticks until spring.
Thanks again for all the good info and pics.
Ron
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Old 12-07-2005, 11:07 PM
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Default RE: Ultra Stick Lite 120 twin

Johnnie,

Ahhhhhhhh, brings back memories. Good ole days of the $100 flapjaks and hamburgers. Hope your friend does get to fly his T-18 again!

Ron,

Thanks for the compliments. I had some bad experiences in the past with wooden dowels so I have made it a practice to slip brass over the top with epoxy. The brass extends into the leading edge about a 1/4".

The Ultra Stick 60 would make a great home for your pair of Saito 56's. The vertical performance would be spectacular.

My Ultra Stick Light 120 is overpowered with the Satio 72's and would also fly well with the 56's, but airspeed managment would be a must on takeoff and you would probably spend most of your time flying near full throttle. I read in one of the magazines in recent months where someone was flying a 22+ lb. Ziroli B-25 with Saito 72's, so that gives you an idea of what you can get away with.

Mike
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Old 12-08-2005, 03:24 AM
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Default RE: Ultra Stick Lite 120 twin

Great Airplane!!!

If you have time could you please post a little info about making the Nose Cone and the front end of the Nacells... Photo's too if you have them...

I'm a novice builder but about to start a similar project on my Trainer...

Cheers

Matt

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Old 12-09-2005, 12:06 AM
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Default RE: Ultra Stick Lite 120 twin

Matt,

These pictures, plus what I have already posted, are all that I have. That is, all that would be of any use for construction. The detailed pictures of the nose cone construction are on some undeveloped 35mm film! I was in between digital cameras during portions of this project.

The nose cone was constructed as follows:

I made templates for the top and side views out of poster board. When satisfied with the shape I transfered this to 1/4" balsa sheet and cut to shape. The side view piece of balsa was tack glued to the firewall of the fuselage. The top view was split into two pieces, removing the middle 1/4", and then glued to the each side view piece of balsa, and tack glued to the firewall. When viewed from the front the balsa pieces looked somewhat like an inverted cross, because the point of the nose is lower than the centerline of the fuselage.

I cut four pieces of 4 lb. density pink insulation foam to shape and glued these into the empty sections of the balsa nose pieces. The rear face of each foam piece was also tack glued to the firewall. The foam was sanded to shape using the balsa cross sections as a guide. When satisfied with the shape I filled any low spots with sheet rock mud (you could also use lightweight spackle). When dried the mud was sanded to shape. I then applied a light coat of mud to the whole nose piece to fill the pores of the foam, and again, when dried I lightly sanded the mud again. At this point I had a male nose plug.

I covered the fuselage area just behind the firewall with plastic packaging tape to protect the covering on the fuselage while sanding the sheet rock mud. A second layer of tape was then applied before the fiberglass/epoxy layup.

I applied four coats of carnuba wax on the nose plug, with a light buff between coats. I used four layers of 3.7 oz. E-glass cloth and epoxy laminating resin to cover the male nose plug, staggering the overlaps on the bottom on the nose. The cloth will not cover the pointed nose during this process so just cut out the nose area on each layer. Keep this to a minimum. Cut four circlular pieces of cloth and apply on the nose to patch each layer. Make sure to cut the big pieces of cloth on the 45 degree bias. This will aid in the cloth laying down over curves and corners.

I use a polyester based peel-ply material to cover my final layer of fiberglass cloth. When cured the peel-ply is easily removed and it provides a matt finish to the surface and smooths the edges of the last layer of cloth. Check out Aircraft Spruce & Specialty Co. or any composite supply business for peel-ply and the 3.7 oz E-glass cloth. Use the lightest weight cloth possible; 1.8 oz maximum.

Sand the epoxy nose cone to smooth things out, then fill any low spots with a epoxy lightweight filler ((epoxy and micro-balloons (hollow spheres of glass)). Sand and re-apply the filler as needed to get the nose as smooth as you want.

When satisfied with your work remove the nose cone from the fuselage, with lots of wiggling. Back and forth, up and down. It will eventualy come off without damaging anything.

The foam is removed with gasoline or acetone. I prefer acetone because it is cleaner. The balsa comes out fairly easy. Measure, mark, and cut the rear portion of the nose cone to size and then mount to your fuselage as desired. I used several screws into the plywood edges of the firewall.

With the engines mounted to the nacells the engine cowlings were constructed as follows:

I wrapped the engine nacell with six layers of masking tape and one layer of plastic packaging tape. This was to later make up for the thickness of the fiberglass lay-ups on the inside of the cowling and the covering on the nacell. Tack glue some 1/8" balsa standoffs to the rear face of a spinner backplate. Cut 1/4" balsa spinner rings 3/32" smaller than the radius of your spinners, and tack glue this to the 1/8" balsa standoffs. Mount your spinner backplate to the engine. Cut and fit four major pieces of 3/32" sheet balsa from the spinner ring to the masking tape on the nacells. Glue in place, but keep the glue to a minimum on the taped area of the nacell. You might have to wet the balsa to get it to form around the spinner ring. Fill in the exposed area with balsa. Cut and fit, cut and fit and glue.

When finished remove the cowling from the nacell, but leave the spinner backpate glued to the cowling. Sand to shape, but make sure that you undersand the area behind the spinner backplate to approx. thirty thousands; the thickness of two layers of fiberglass cloth, primer, and paint.

When satisfied remove the spinner backplate and the 1/8" standoffs. I applied two layers of 3.7 oz cloth and epoxy resin to the inside of the cowing. When cured you need to make hardpoints for your screws by removing the balsa in those areas and filling with epoxy, or epoxy mixed with milled-fiber. Apply two layers of cloth to the outside of the cowling. Finish the exterior the same as the nose cone. Trim the cowling to fit around the engine, etc. and your ready for the final finish.

For the cowling construction I used an old aluminum spinner backplate so that I didn't have to worry about scratches and such.

Hope this helps. See the Composite Forum here on RCU for some good ideas.

Mike
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Old 12-09-2005, 01:29 AM
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Default RE: Ultra Stick Lite 120 twin

AWESOME!!!

Thanks so much...
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Old 12-09-2005, 05:40 PM
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Default RE: Ultra Stick Lite 120 twin

Unreal Mike, Beautiful Job [sm=thumbup.gif][sm=thumbup.gif]. I hope you don't mind me stealing your idea too. I would bet there will be a few more flying around the country also.

Really Great Job !!!!! Very clean install.


Come to think of it, I would bet guys would pay for the made up mods you produced to be able to just cut out the wing section and stick them on...........I know I would.
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Old 12-09-2005, 09:23 PM
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Default RE: Ultra Stick Lite 120 twin

Sharing the information is part of the fun of this hobby. Have at it!!

I thought about making molds for these parts, just in case I accidently needed one, but due to time constraints I did not. Next time I will make female molds to provide parts for those interested. Sorry, that doesn't help you out now.

Don't forget to remove the covering from the wing center section before gluing the panels together. Afterwards, apply two layers of fiberglass cloth with 1/2" staggered edges (first layer 6.5" wide, second layer 5.5" wide), and cover with peel-ply to smooth everything out. The peel-ply provides a better finish for recovering. I would suggest that you use 2.0 oz to 3.7 oz fiberglass cloth for this.

I have heard that the Ultra Stick Lite 120 wings are weak and several have failed. One of my wing panels had very lightweight balsa wood on the "D" section, and this panel was 3.0 oz lighter than the other.

I used Balsarite over the composite lay-up so that the Ultracoat would stick well and not pull up over time. Actually, I did a small test area without Balsarite and the covering did not stick well to the epoxy lay-up which was final sanded with 220 grit. The Balsarite did the trick, and has held up "better than new" since.

Mike
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Old 03-26-2017, 02:24 PM
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This thread has gathered a lot of dust!

I have kept my Ultra Stick Heavy around
from the time this thread started. I took
a break from RC for several years, while
I concentrated on getting my full size up
& running.

I have my Ultra Stick out on my work benches
to make some repairs & begin working to
convert to a twin, per this thread. As a test,
I coverted an Dazzle to a twin using 2 .25
Magnums, to lead me to my Ultra Stick
conversion.

I have 1 OS ,61 FX, so I have my feelers
out for another one. They have been
discontinued for some time, apparently.

I'll keep posting about the conversion
if anyone seems interested.

John
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Old 03-27-2017, 03:34 AM
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Bob Paris
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Hay Guys,
I love Ugly Sticks...just love them. Your work is great...nicely done and a clean conversion. Horizons Ultra Stick 1.20 was a great model...and the Lite 1.20 was my last one...folded a wing on my 1.20 light...a 23cc gas engine was a bit to much power...but did it go vertical quite nicely. Your conversion to a twin was superb and beautiful.

I am now building the new Ultra Stick 30cc gas ARF. I am installing a VVRC 40cc gas twin cylinder into mine. I am breaking in two of these for a large twin F7F and a perfect airframe to do it. After I break these engines in...I will install an EME 35. I have built two, three and four engine Ugly Sticks, the Canard Stick, flying wing stick and built my first Stick...from a Larry Lenard kit, the Little Stick (from Cox .010 powered up) and usually over powered the heck out of my Sticks. I must have built a good half dozen of his kits, powered by a S.T. G23 and then over to larger Jensen kits with a K & B .61...his had dihedral in the main wing.

Nice Build Buddy.....
Bobby of Maui

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Old 03-27-2017, 04:39 AM
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I had a 35cc Homelite conversion on my Ultra Stick,
but it wouldn't generate enough speed to get it up
on plane. Always nose high, flying on angle of attack.
It flew, but not well. That engine was better on flat
bottom airfoil wings.

John
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Old 10-01-2018, 10:09 AM
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I have dusted this project off & I have it on my
bench.. Most of the design work is done. I have
to epoxy the engine/fuel tank boxes together &
cover them. Making forward firewall parts today
to allow for some out thrust.

I took 5 years off to get my full size plane
finished & flying. My RC buddy & I have been
flying a lot of scale foam electrics, Eflite P-51's,
Corsairs, Spitfires, etc, but we are getting back to
glow & gas. This is one of a few projects that I had
put away, but it is the one closest to flying so I'm
getting it finished first. After that will be a Sig Wonder
that I will build as twin with 2 OS ,10 FP's. After those
engines are broken in, I'll move them to an F-82 that I
am going to build from 2 House of Balsa .20 P-51 kits.

Also, I am glad to see these older threads still here. There
is a lot of knowledge & experience documented here that I
am glad has not gotten lost.

Too much fun!


John
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Old 10-26-2018, 05:53 PM
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As a brief update, I have test ran one engine on the airframe.
I made some cowls for the engines, but I didn't like then so I'll
make another set. My calculations were pretty close to get the
.61's to give me a good CG, with a large battery in the nose
where the original fuel tank was.

I don't think I can fly this weekend, but hopefully I'll put it in
the air before the weather deteriorates for the winter.

John
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