RCU Review: Futaba T7CA 2.4Ghz 7-Channel Radio System


More On This Product

  • 1 Active For-Sale Ad!
  • Discussions on this Product
  • Show user ratings
  • Check for Retailers
  •  
     
    Contributed by: Ken Isaac | Published: December 2007 | Views: 257694 | email icon Email this Article | PDFpdf icon
    Futaba 7C 2.4 Ghz FASST - RCU Review


    Review by: Ken Isaac (RCKen) | Email me


    Futaba
    Distributed Exclusively in the U.S.A., Canada and Mexico by:
    Great Planes Model Distributors
    P.O. Box 9021
    Champaign, IL 61826-9021
    http://2.4gigahertz.com

    www.greatplanes.com

    • 2.4 Spread Spectrum eliminates the need for a frequency pin
    • Now controls dual elevator servos
    • Well laid out and designed transmitter
    • Price is easily affordable to a large segment of pilots
    • Easy to program and setup
    • Small receiver size is perfect for smaller aircraft such as Park Flyers
    • LCD screen seemed small and crowded
    • Manual jumps around
    • Transmitter battery a bit small
    Unless you've been living in a cave with no contact to the outside world it's a pretty good chance that you've heard about the new technology of 2.4 Ghz Spread Spectrum radios. With all of the capabilities of the Spread Spectrum radios it's pretty easy to understand what all the excitement is about with this new technology. Spread Spectrum radios have all but eliminated interference created by other radios in use at the same time. This means that a Spread Spectrum radio can be operated and will not be interfered with if someone else turns on a radio. No more keeping track of frequency pins, no more walking the flight line trying to find if anybody else is on your frequency, and no more worrying that somebody flying a park flyer 2 blocks from your field will knock your plane out of the air.

    With any new technology many will be worried that there are going to be "bugs" with it and will decide to wait before adopting the technology. Often, manufacturers will release a radio and work out the bugs as they come up. But when it comes to 2.4 Ghz technology Futaba is different. All of Futaba's 2.4 Ghz FASST (Futaba Advanced Spread Spectrum Technology) radios are fully tested, well-engineered, totally reliable products. Futaba has hands-on experience with 2.4 Ghz technology that stretches back 15 years, long before anyone considered its value in hobby application. That's when Futaba's industrial R/C division - designers of radio-control tools for construction, civil engineering, and similar uses - began employing and perfecting their own 2.4 Ghz equipment. Now Futaba is bringing that experience in 2.4 Ghz Spread Spectrum technology to the RC hobby market to provide us with a fully test and completely reliable product.

    To speed development in this technology many radio manufacturers are converting their current radio systems to the 2.4 Ghz Spread Spectrum technology. This speeds up the time it takes them to release radios as they are not reinventing the wheel by developing totally new radio systems. Futaba's latest release is just that; one of their most popular radios converted to Spread Spectrum. Futaba's latest release is the 2.4 Ghz Spread Spectrum T7CA, a 7-channel system capable of controlling both aircraft and helicopters. It's a system that offers much of Futaba's 9C set-up versatility matched to 4-channel ease of use. It's a great radio for those flyers who want the technology of 2.4 Ghz but don't want to spend extra money for a more expensive radio with more channels than they need. I think that the 7C will be a perfect fit radio for a large majority of flyers that need a 2.4 Spread Spectrum radio.

    So, let's dive in and take a look at what the T7CA has to offer....



    Futaba T7CA 2.4Ghz 7-Channel Radio System


     

    Price: $319.98* (Tower Hobbies Part # LXSEJ8)
     

    Features

    • Futaba's FASST (Futaba Advanced Spread Spectrum Technology) shifts every two milliseconds virtually eliminating signal conficts and interruptions unlike other 2.4GHz systems that only stay on one or two frequencies

    • Dual antenna diversity enables FASST system to automatically and seamlessly select the best reception between the two antennas built into the receiver ensuring that the aircraft stays under constant control of transmitter regardless of altitude

    • Newly designed Dial-N-Key jog dial allows cursor movement in four directions for very user friendly navigating through menus and programming

    Includes

    • Futaba 7C 2.4GHz Transmitter R617FS FAST 7-Ch Receiver

    • NR-4J 600mAh 4.8V NiCd Receiver Battery

    • FBC-19B(4) 120V Battery Charger

    • Four S3004 Standard Ball Bearing Servos

    • NT8S600B 600mAh 9.6V NiCd Transmitter Battery

    • Heavy Duty Switch Harness w/Charge Cord

    • Black Transmitter Neck Strap

    • Servo mounting hardware and instruction manual

    Specifications

    • Available with 4 S3152 digital high-torque servos

    • (FUTK7000/7001); 4 S3004 ball bearing servos (FUTK7002); or

    • 4 S3001 ball bearing servos (FUTK7003)

    • Dial 'n Key programming

    • Airplane/heli software

    • Assignable switches/functions

    • Up/down timer

    • Mode 1-4 selectable (modes 3 and 4 available via transmitter software)

    • Large 72 x 32 LCD screen with adjustable contrast

    • 10-model memory

    • 6-character model naming

    • Digital trims, trim memory, EPA, subtrims and servo reversing (all channels)

    • Dual/Triple rates - aileron/elevator/rudder. (Note: Available when used with 3-position switch)

    • Exponential (aileron/elevator/rudder)

    • Adjustable throttle cut

    • Fail-safe

    • NT8S600B 600mAh Tx NiCd w/dual-output charger

    • Trainer system (cord required)

    • Flap switch

    • Retract switch

    • Variable rate knob (channel 6)

    Airplane advanced menu

    • 3 programmable (P-Mix) mixes
    • Flaperon
    • Flap trim
    • Air brake
    • Elevator-to-flap mixing
    • Flap-to-elevator mixing
    • V-tail mixing
    • Elevon mixing
    • Aileron-to-rudder mixing
    • Snap roll
    • Dual elevator servo mixing

    Helicopter advanced menu

    • Governor select makes it possible to match

    • rpm/blade speed to maneuvers
    • Swash to throttle mixing helps heli pilots keep their rpm steady

    • 3 programmable mixes

    • Throttle curve (5-point normal, idle up 1 & 2)

    • Pitch curve (5-point normal, idle up 1 & 2)

    • Revo mixing

    • Gyro mixing

    • Hovering throttle

    • Hovering pitch

    • Throttle hold

    • Trim offset

    • 6 swash plate set-ups (5 CCPM options)

    * Note: This price is for the package listed above. Also available are two packages with the radio and receiver only, no servos are included

    Futaba 7C 7-Channel 2.4 Ghz (Air) with no servos, $279, FUTK7004
    Futaba 7C 7-Channel 2.4 Ghz (Heli) with no servos, $279, FUTK7005


    Futaba R617FS 2.4 Ghz FASST 7 Channel Reciever

    Note: For this review I did not receive the entire radio setup. I received the radio and receiver only, and did not receive the rest of what would normally be included when this system is purchased. Not shown here are all accessories such as the receiver battery, battery charger, servos, servo mounting hardware, power switch, and neck strap. In addition, I did not receive a production copy of the users manual, but rather a printed copy of the final draft of the manual.

    Anybody familiar with previous Futaba radios will immediately recognize the T7C since the exterior of the radio is identical to Futaba's older 7C radios. The radio gimbals and sticks are of high quality and are laid out so they are comfortable and easy to use. Each of the four axis has an associated digital trim tab for fine-tuning of the plane in flight. The biggest difference between the T7C and older radios is the antenna. The antenna is made of a hard rubber and is about 4" long. The antenna needs to be placed in a position perpendicular to the radio while in operation.

    Located on the upper left of the radio are 4 of the radio's switches. Directly above the left control stick are two 2-position switches. As with all of the switches on the T7C radio these switches are user programmable and can be set to almost any functions that the radio is capable of performing. The inner of the two switches is longer than the outer switch to make it easier to find while flying the plane. Located on the top left of the radio are two more switches. One switch is a two position switch and the other is spring loaded, which would normally be used for a trainer function or a throttle kill. Directly above the right stick are one 2-position switch and a variable rate knob that can be used for such functions as controlling the throw of flaps. On the top right side of the radio is one 3-position switch.

    Located on the back of the radio are the battery compartment, a trainer cord connection, and a radio status indicator. While it is kind of difficult to see in the pictures, the indicator is located in a recessed hole below the antenna. Contained here is a red and green LED, which indicates the proper operation of the radio signal when binding the receiver.

    Programming and setting up the T7C radio is facilitated by a LCD display, 4 navigation buttons, and Futaba's "Dial 'n Key". The buttons and the Dial 'n Key allow for moving through the radio's programming screens and for changing the information in each screen. I found it very easy to move through the screens with the controls provided and setting up the radio was accomplished with very few problems. One of my only problems with the radio was the LCD screen. I felt that it was a bit small and that the screens it displayed all seemed a bit "crowded". But this did not take away from the functionality of the programming setup.

    The radio comes with a 600 Mah Nickel-Cadmium battery to power the transmitter.


    The Manual

    I've included a few shots of the manual that I received with this radio but I really can't make any comments based on this as the manual that I received was a copy of the working draft from Futaba. From the draft I could tell that the manual was very informative and did a good job of explaining the operation of the Futaba T7C 2.4 Ghz radio. It covered all the functions of the radio and gave a short step-by-step explanation of how to program each step in the radio. It also did a good job of covering the installation of the FASST receiver as well as binding the receiver to the transmitter.


    The Receiver

    One of the first things that will strike most people when they see this system is the receiver. Immediately most will notice the size of the receiver. The receiver is approximately one and a half inches by 1 inch, and only about a third of an inch thick making this receiver small enough to fit into even the smaller park flyer systems that are becoming more popular every day. As you can see, when shown next to other Futaba receivers, the R617FS receiver is quite a bit smaller. But don't let the size fool you; this receiver is more than capable of handling the needs of large planes with huge servos. This receiver should be more than enough for just about every pilot out there.


    The next thing that most will notice is the antenna, or more accurately, antennas. Most people who are used to older
    radios will notice that the 3' long piece of wire used as an antenna is gone. In its place are two wires that are used as the antennas. To be more specific the antennas are only the last 1-1/4" of the wire (the clear wire portion) on each side. The other 4" of the antenna structures is simple coaxial wire that allows for placement of the antennas inside of the plane for best reception. Futaba has chosen to use the two antennas to achieve what they call Dual Antenna Diversity. The signal for the 2.4 Ghz is a much shorter wavelength than older radios, and because of this it's entirely possible that the antenna could become shielded by items inside of the fuselage which could include the engine, muffler, or carbon fiber parts. With the dual antennas used for reception one antenna should still be able to receive a signal if the other antenna becomes shielded.


    In order for the Dual Antenna Diversity to operate properly the antennas need to be properly installed in the airplane. The two antennas need to be installed so that they are mounted 90 degrees from each other. When I installed them in my plane it was a simple matter to position the antennas. Two small pieces of tubing glued in place in the fuselage keeps the antennas in place. As with other radios, care must be taken when positioning the antennas so that they are not near RF noise producing items such as engine ignition units and electronic speed controls (ESC).


    NOTE: This information is provided by Futaba's 2.4 Ghz website


    Other 2.4GHz systems hold firm to one or two frequencies, increasing the potential for interference. The frequency of Futaba 2.4GHz FASST shifts every 2 milliseconds, so there are no signal conflicts or interruptions - and no need for a frequency pin!

    Patent # 6,141,392
    2.4GHz FASST scans incoming data and applies sophisticated error correction techniques ? resulting in a system that gives you a solid, impenetrable connection with your model.



    Futaba 2.4GHz FASST systems seamlessly select the best reception between two receiver antennas, so there's no loss of signal.



    Futaba 2.4GHz FASST system transmitters leave the factory with a unique and permanent ID code. Once linked to the receiver, the code ensures that the receiver will recognize and respond ONLY to that transmitter. The linking process is simple...just push a button on the receiver.


    Setting up the T7C

    Note: The radio that I received for this review was the package that contains only the radio and receiver only. I didn't receive any servos for use with this radio during the review, and because of this I had to use my own servos. Some may notice that the wires for the servos in my review plane are "the other guy's" equipment. They are the servos that I already had installed in my plane and I used them simply because they were already in place. This is actually good because it does show that this radio will work with any brand servo the end user may have with no issues. My servos had the standard "Z" connectors on them and they were able to plug directly into the FASST receiver without needing any further modifications.

    To try out the Futaba T7C radio I decided to use my tried and trusted Kaos 60. This plane has been with me for quite a while now and has turned into quite a little test bed for items that I try out or review. Installing the radio in this plane was a very simple matter. I placed the receiver in foam and then positioned the dual antennas so they could be positioned on the top of the fuselage. To place the antennas I used a tip provided by RCU reviewer Minnflyer when he reviewed the Futaba 6EX radio. He glued small pieces of tubing in place and used those to keep the dual antennas properly positioned in the plane. This made a quick, easy, and neat installation of the receiver. With the antennas properly positioned it was an easy task to connect the servos to the receiver and finish packing foam around the receiver.

    As with most Spread Spectrum radios in order for the receiver to work properly with the transmitter it must be "bound" to that transmitter. Normally the user will not have to bind the receiver to the transmitter as this step should have already been done at the factory when the radio was packaged. The transmitter and receiver will be ready to go when the user opens the box. But if for some reason they two are not bound together it is a very simple procedure for the user to perform. To bind the receiver to the transmitter first turn on the transmitter and then turn on the receiver. Located between the two antenna wires is a small button recessed in the receiver case. Press and hold this button to bind it. While binding, the LED's in the transmitter will flash and finally change to a solid green when the receiver is bound. The button can then be released. Next up was getting my plane set up on the new transmitter.

    Programming the radio for the setup needed on my plane turned out to be a very easy task. It took me about 10 minutes to have my plane completely set up on the new radio. It was very simple process to set the throw direction and end points for all of the control surfaces, including the throttle.

    While not "technically" a set up step, I want to discuss range checking the radio here. With older radios range checking was done by walking 30-50 paces away from the radio and lowering the antenna while working the controls to see if the radio still works properly. Of course that's hard to do with a 2.4 Ghz radio because you can't lower the antenna. Futaba has taken care of this by providing a means of "powering down" the radio so that it transmits with less power than normal. This will allow the pilot to check the radio for proper operation before flying. To put the radio into "Power Down Mode" (P.DN) the user needs to turn on the radio while holding down the Dial-N-Key button. The radio will power up with the symbol "P.DN" in the lower portion of the LCD display, and will emit a beep every 3 seconds while in power down mode. The radio will stay in this mode for 90 seconds before returning to normal operation. The user can return the radio to normal mode by pressing and holding the Dial 'n Key button for about two seconds, or the user can simply turn the radio off and then back on again.


    Programming the T7C

    While I have heard some say that it's difficult to program the more advanced Futaba radios, I was pleasantly surprised to find that wasn't the case with the T7C. Once I was into the programming modes I found that it was very easy to move around to the different functions of the radio. I was able to figure out a good bit of the functions of the radio without referring to the manual, and the points that I didn't understand were easy to find in the manual and get figured out.

    While I don't want to try and replace or rewrite the Futaba manual here, I do want to spend a little bit of time and go through the programming and screenshots so that you can get an idea of what this radio is capable of.

    As we get started let's take a quick look at the controls used for programming the T7C radio. The LCD display is centered on the radio and measures 7/8" x 2-1/8". Located on the left side of the display are two push buttons labeled Mode/Page and End. On the right side of the display are two buttons that control the selection or the cursor, one button for up and left and the other button for down and right. To the far right of the display is the Dial 'N Key for further programming choices. This control is turned to navigate through choices on the screen and then pressed to select the item. One great example of using the Dial 'N Key is when naming the model in the radio. For each letter in the name the Dial 'N Key is turned to scroll through the alphabet and number, and then when the proper selection is found pressing the Dial 'N Key will make the selection.

    To get started with the programming the radio needs to be turned on and then hold down the Mode/Page button for one second to get into the programming mode on the radio.

    Once into the programming screens of the T7C pressing the Mode/Page button will switch back and forth between the Basic and Advanced menus. With the either the basic or advanced menu displayed you can navigate through the menu by using the Dial 'N Key.

    Basic Airplane Menu Screen

    Advanced Airplane Menu Screen


    Basic Airplane Menu Functions
    Model Sub-menu

    Model submenu: includes three functions that manage model memory: Model Select, Model Copy, and Model Name.

    • Model Select: This function selects which of the 10 model memories in the transmitter to set up or fly.

    • Model Copy: copies the current model data into another model memory in the transmitter.

    • Model Name: assigns a name to the current model memory.

    Dual rate / Exponential Sub-menu

    Dual/triple rates and exponential (D/R,EXP): assigns adjusted rates and exponential.

    • Dual/Triple Rates: reduce/increase the servo travel by flipping a switch, dual rates affect the control listed, such as aileron,

    • Exponential: changes the response curve of the servos relative to the stick position to make flying more pleasant.

    Endpoint Sub-menu

    End Point of servo travel adjustment: the most flexible version of travel adjustment available. It independently adjusts each end of each individual servo's travel, rather than one setting for the servo that affects both directions.

    Sub-Trim Sub-menu

    Sub-trim: makes small changes or corrections to the neutral position of each servo. Range is -120 to +120, with 0 setting, the default, being no Sub-trim.

    Servo Reversing Sub-menu

    Servo reversing: changes the direction an individual servo responds to a control stick motion.

    Trim Sub-menu

    Trim: resets and adjusts effectiveness of digital trims.

    Throttle Cut Sub-menu

    Throttle cut: provides an easy way to stop the engine by flipping a switch (with Throttle Stick at idle).

    Fail Safe Sub-menu

    Fail Safe (loss of clean signal and low receiver battery) submenu: sets responses in case of loss of signal or low receiver battery.

    Parameter Sub-menu

    Parameter submenu: sets those parameters you would likely set once, and then not disturb again.

    • Model Reset: completely resets all data in the individual model you have currently selected.

    • Model Type: sets the type of programming used for this model, either airplane (acro) or helicopter (heli)

    Timer Sub-menu

    Up/Down Timer functions: controls an electronic clock used to keep track of time remaining in a competition time allowed, flying time on a tank of fuel, amount of time on a battery, etc..

    Trainer Sub-menu

    Trainer: for training novice pilots with optional trainer cord connecting 2 transmitters. The instructor has several levels of controllability.


    Advanced Airplane Menu Functions

    P-Mixes Sub-menu

    The 7C contains three separate linear programmable mixes.
    There are a variety of reasons you might want to use these mixes. A few are listed here.

    • To correct bad tendencies of the aircraft (such as rolling in response to rudder input).

    • To automatically correct for a particular action (such as lowering elevator when flaps are lowered).

    • To operate a second channel in response to movement in a first channel (such as increasing the amount of smoke oil

    • in response to more throttle application, but only when the smoke switch is active).

    • To turn off response of a primary control in certain circumstances (such as simulating one engine flaming-out on a twin, or throttle-assisted rudder turns, also with a twin).

    Flaperon Sub-menu

    Flaperon mixing function uses one servo on each of the two ailerons, and uses them for both aileron and flap function. For flap effect, the ailerons raise/lower simultaneously. Of course, aileron function (moving in opposite directions) is also performed.

    Flap Trim Sub-menu

    Flap-trim allows the flap action to be set in a way that it can be adjusted with the VR dial.

    Airbrake Sub-menu

    Airbrake is one function that is really made up of a series of pre-programmed mixes all done for you within the radio. Airbrake simultaneously moves the flap and elevator, and is usually used to make steep descents or to limit increases in airspeed in dives.

    Elevator to Flap Mix Sub-menu

    Elevator to Flap Mix: This mix makes the flaps drop or rise whenever the Elevator stick is moved. It is most commonly used to make tighter pylon turns or squarer corners in maneuvers. In most cases, the flaps droop (are lowered) when up elevator is commanded.

    Flap to Elevator Mix Sub-menu

    Flap To Elevator Mix: This mix makes the elevator move whenever the flaps are moved. This mix is used to compensate for any pitching created by the flap.

    V-Tail Sub-menu

    V-Tail mixing is used with v-tail aircraft so that both elevator and rudder functions are combined for the two tail surfaces. The elevator and rudder travel can be adjusted independently.

    Elevon Sub-menu

    Elevon: used with delta wings, flying wings, and other tailless aircraft that combine aileron and elevator functions, using two servos, one on each elevon.

    Ailevator Sub-menu

    Ailevator: Many models use two elevator servos, plugged in to separate receiver channels. Benefits

    • Ability to adjust each servo's center and end points for perfectly matched travel.

    • Ease of assembly, not requiring torque rods for a single servo to drive 2 servos.

    • Elevators acting also as ailerons for extreme stunt flying or more realistic jet flying.

    • Redundancy, for example in case of a servo failure or mid-air collision.

    Aileron to Rudder Mix Sub-menu

    Aileron to Rudder mixing is a pre-programmed linear mix. This mix is used to mix rudder operation with aileron operation automatically, to make realistic coordinated turns. It is especially effective when turning and banking scale models or large models that resemble full-sized aircraft.

    Snap Sub-Menu

    This function allows you to execute snap rolls by flipping a switch, providing the same input every time. It also removes the need to change dual rates on the 3 channels prior to performing a snap, as Snap-Roll always takes the servos to the same position, regardless of dual rates, inputs held during the snap, etc.

    Basic Helicopter Menu Screen

    Advanced Helicopter Menu Screen

    Basic Helicopter Menu Functions
    Model Sub-menu

    Model submenu: includes three functions that manage model memory: Model Select, Model Copy, and Model Name.

    • Model Select: This function selects which of the 10 model memories in the transmitter to set up or fly.

    • Model Copy: copies the current model data into another model memory in the transmitter.

    • Model Name: assigns a name to the current model memory.

    Dual rate / Exponential Sub-menu

    Dual/triple rates and exponential (D/R,EXP): assigns adjusted rates and exponential.

    • Dual/Triple Rates: reduce/increase the servo travel by flipping a switch, dual rates affect the control listed, such as aileron,

    • Exponential: changes the response curve of the servos relative to the stick position to make flying more pleasant.

    Endpoint Sub-menu

    End Point of servo travel adjustment: the most flexible version of travel adjustment available. It independently adjusts each end of each individual servo's travel, rather than one setting for the servo that affects both directions.

    Sub-Trim Sub-menu

    Sub-trim: makes small changes or corrections to the neutral position of each servo. Range is -120 to +120, with 0 setting, the default, being no Sub-trim

    Servo Reversing Sub-menu

    Servo reversing: changes the direction an individual servo responds to a control stick motion.

    Trim Sub-menu

    Trim: resets and adjusts effectiveness of digital trims.

    Throttle Cut Sub-menu

    Throttle cut: provides an easy way to stop the engine by flipping a switch (with Throttle Stick at idle).

    Fail Safe Sub-menu

    Fail Safe (loss of clean signal and low receiver battery) submenu: sets responses in case of loss of signal or low receiver battery.

    Parameter Su-menu

    Parameter submenu: sets those parameters you would likely set once, and then not disturb again.

    • Model Reset: completely resets all data in the individual model you have currently selected.

    • Type: The 7C radios support 6 basic swashplate setups, including "single servo" (H- 1 - most helicopters use this type) and 5 types of CCPM (cyclic and collective pitch mixing). A "single servo" swashplate uses one servo for each axis: aileron, elevator (cyclic pitch), and collective pitch. CCPM helicopters utilize a combination of servos working together to achieve the 3 axes of motion.

    Throttle Curve (Normal)

    Throttle Curve (Normal}: Inputs the normal (NORM) throttle curve, which is usually not a linear response to the throttle stick motion. The Throttle Curve has 5 separate points of adjustment to allow for finer control of helicopter.

    .

    Pitch Curve (Normal)

    Pitch Curve (Normal): inputs the normal (NORM) collective pitch curve, the collective pitch curve for flight near hover. The Pitch Curve has 5 separate points of adjustment to allow for finer control of helicopter.

    Revo Sub-menu

    REVO.: mixes collective pitch commands to the rudder (a PITCH-RUDDER mix) to suppress the torque generated by changes in the main rotor's collective pitch angle, keeping the model from yawing when throttle is applied.

    Timer Sub-menu

    Up/Down Timer functions: controls an electronic clock used to keep track of time remaining in a competition time allowed, flying time on a tank of fuel, amount of time on a battery, etc.

    Trainer Sub-menu

    Trainer: for training novice pilots with optional trainer cord connecting 2 transmitters. The instructor has several levels of controllability.


    Advanced Helicopter Menu Functions

    Throttle Curve (Advanced) Sub-menu

    This 5-point curve is utilized to best match the blade collective pitch to the engine RPM for consistent load on the the engine. Curves are separately adjustable for normal, idle-up 1, and idle-up 2.

    Pitch Curve (Advanced) Sub-menu

    This 5-point curve is utilized to best match the blade collective pitch to the engine RPM for consistent load on the the engine. Curves are separately adjustable for normal, idle-up 1, and idle-up 2. In addition, a separate collective pitch curve is available for throttle hold.

    Revo Mix (Advanced) Sub-menu

    This linear curve mix adds opposite rudder input to counteract the changes in torque when the speed and collective pitch of the blades is changed.

    Gyro Sub-menu

    Gyro: simplifies adjusting/selecting the gyro sensitivity, and can provide more than 2 gyro gain settings. (The higher the gain, the more correction the gyro provides and the "softer" or less responsive the helicopter feels.) This function makes the best possible use of the inflight adjustable gain of most gyros.

    Hover Throttle Sub-menu

    Hovering Adjustments - Hover Throttle: Hovering throttle is a fine-tuning adjustments for the throttle, affecting performance only around the center point. They allow in-flight tweaking of the curves for ideal setup.

    Hover Pitch Sub-menu

    Hovering Adjustments - Hover Pitch: Hovering pitch is a fine-tuning adjustments for the collective pitch curves individually, affecting performance only around the center point. They allow in-flight tweaking of the curves for ideal setup.

    Throttle Hold Sub-menu

    Throttle Hold: This function holds the engine in the idling position and disengages it from the THROTTLE STICK when SWITCH E is moved. It is commonly used to practice auto-rotation.

    Offset Sub-menu

    Offset: Optional separate trims in addition to those for the normal condition. This function is used to automatically change the trim of a helicopter, for example, when transitioned from hover to flying at high speed.

    Governor Sub-menu

    Governor: The Governor mixing function is use to adjust the GV-1 (Governor) speed settings from the transmitter.

    Swashplate to Throttle Sub-Menu

    Swashplate to Throttle: The swashplate to throttle mixing corrects slow of the engine speed caused by swashplate operation at aileron or elevator operation. Engine speed can be increased independently at aileron or elevator operation in each flight condition.

    P-Mixes Sub-menu

    The 7C contains three separate linear programmable mixes.
    There are a variety of reasons you might want to use these mixes. A few are listed here.

    Flying the plane turned out to be an adventure. Looking at the forecast I found that we were staring down the barrel of a huge oncoming ice storm, so I tried to sneak out before it hit and fly the plane. It was a less than perfect day to fly because it was dark, overcast, misty rain, and a temperature hovering around 45 degrees. Normally I wouldn't fly in conditions like this, but I needed to get this review turned in. After a good range check I got the plane in the air as quickly as I could. I didn't get too fancy on my flying because of the conditions and I didn't want to get into trouble. I did fly the plane out as far as I could see to check the range and had no problems with it. The control and feel of the plane was very good and I was quite pleased with the way the radio felt as I was flying. After about 10 minutes I couldn't take the conditions any longer so I brought the plane in, loaded up, went home, and warmed up with a cup of hot chocolate!

    After the "real" flight of the plane I decided I needed to get some more stick time to get a better feel for the radio so I connected it up to RealFlight 3.5 and spent the evening flying different planes with it. This gave me the chance to get a good feel for all of the switches and controls of the radio. The more that I used the radio the more I liked the feel for it in my hands. Everything felt like it was exactly where it should have been. I was able to find all of the switches and controls without fumbling or looking down at the radio. I was quickly becoming a big fan of this radio.

    I only have a few items that I felt could have been done better. The first would be the LCD display. The display I thought the display could have been bigger. While the screen was clear and easy to understand I felt that it seemed a bit crowded and could have been a bit bigger. But by no means did it take away from the great functionality of the 7C's programming. The second item would be the transmitter battery. I felt that it was a bit small in today's age of computer radios that control multiple planes. The last item would be setting up dual elevator servos. When setting up dual elevator servos there is no way to individually trim each servo with the radio itself. A mechanical adjustment must be used to trim an individual servo in a dual elevator setup. This isn't a huge deal because each servo can still be adjusted manually.

    The transmitter battery is one other area that I felt was a bit weak. With the technology of today's radios I wish that batteries with larger capacities would be provided. As computer radios have ever-increasing capacity to control more planes it's becoming more common to see someone show up at the flying field with several planes to fly, all being controlled by one radio. Smaller capacity batteries may not have the capacity to provide a full flying day for multiple planes. I would like to have seen a bigger battery provided with the radio.

    Installing the radio into my plane was a very simple matter. I really liked the Dual antenna wires for the Spread Spectrum as I felt they were easier to install than other 2.4 Ghz radio systems that I have seen. Placing the 2 wires in the fuselage was very easy to do and posed no problems at all. Once installed and in the air I really liked the feel of the radio. The radio felt good in my hands and all the controls were easily accessible for my fingers. The resolution of the control sticks was good and I liked the response of the plane to my control inputs. I've had many radios in my Kaos, but I think that I have found the radio that is going to stay in it! The 7C has found a new home!

    Anybody that has programmed a Futaba radio will have no problems with the T7C. The programming is unchanged from earlier 7C radios. I found the manual easy to understand and it did a good job of explaining the different functions of the radio. Many of the most popular mixes are predefined in the programming of the radio, but there are enough user defined mixes to allow the user to customize his setup. As with most advanced Futaba radios all of the switches on the radio can be changed and defined by the end-user, so the radio can be customized by the pilot for what fits best.

    Futaba has another winner with their T7C 2.4 Ghz radio system. They have combined their popular 7C radio system with the proven benefits of 2.4 Ghz Spread Spectrum technology to produce a radio system that will appeal to a wide variety of pilots. Many pilots these days want the advanced mixing and programming capabilities but don't want to pay for a 9 or 12 channel radio and they will find that the T7C is the perfect fit for them. The added security that Spread Spectrum gives the pilot while flying makes this radio an all around winner.

    Futaba T7CA 2.4Ghz 7-Channel Radio System


    Futaba
    Distributed Exclusively in the U.S.A., Canada and Mexico by:
    Great Planes Model Distributors
    P.O. Box 9021
    Champaign, IL 61826-9021
    http://2.4gigahertz.com

    www.greatplanes.com

    Comments on RCU Review: Futaba T7CA 2.4Ghz 7-Channel Radio System

    Posted by: Red Baron Dave on 01/07/2008
    I wonder when the 9C will also be 2.4Ghz, as the 6 and now the 7 have made the conversion. I agree the standard screen is much tooo small!
    Posted by: hlhamner on 01/31/2008

    Posted by: AJsToyz on 02/12/2008
    I am really happy with my 72mhz 7C but my 2.4 version is in the mail. I have no complaints at all about this system!
    Posted by: uduman on 02/18/2008
    You said "When setting up dual elevator servos there is no way to individually trim each servo with the radio itself." Are you sure? I witnessed a club member use the AILEVATOR mix with AIL3 & AIL4 rates set to 0. The two elev servos worked opposite to each other and the trim worked on both servos.
    Posted by: RCKen on 02/18/2008
    Yes, you can trim BOTH of the elevator servos with the trim tab for the elevator channel. But what I was referring to is that there is no way to trim each individual servo once they are bound together in to the Ailevator mix. If adjustments need to be made to an individual servo then they must be done mechanically, as there is no way to do it within the radio. Ken
    Posted by: uduman on 02/19/2008
    Ahh, right, sorry. I read that as only one servo would respond to the trim adjustment. I see what you are saying.
    Posted by: rcmaster12 on 03/05/2008
    Have you tried to switch the throttle stick to the heli style? Does the manual explanin this well?
    Posted by: perfectplanes on 04/21/2008
    I understand you can set up the transmitter for different modes. I fly mode 4 and was wondering how difficult it is to set that up.
    Posted by: uduman on 04/30/2008
    I just received mine yesterday and need to setup dual elevator servos. I assume channel 2 is for the right elevator half but what channel does the left half go into in order to use the AILVATOR function? Thanks Uduman
    Posted by: harphunt on 05/02/2008
    It is my understanding that the other elevator goes into ch 5. PEACE
    Page: 1 2 >
    The comments, observations and conclusions made in this review are solely with respect to the particular item the editor reviewed and may not apply generally to similar products by the manufacturer. We cannot be responsible for any manufacturer defects in workmanship or other deficiencies in products like the one featured in the review.

    EMAIL THIS ARTICLE OR CHECK OUT THESE OTHER GREAT REVIEWS!
     
    PhotoManufacturerProductSummaryReviewed
    AresExera 130CXIt seems that everywhere I look, I see 'toy' helicopters. All the stores are carrying the latest models of the little coaxial...06/21/2014
    HelionDominus 10SCv2The Helion Dominus SCv2 is a short course 4x4 truck, and it's a crowded space filled with many choices and price ranges. This...06/08/2014
    Heli-Max1SiThe 1Si is not short of impressive functionalities and it is with excitement that I saw one delivered at my door for review. ...05/26/2014
    Great PlanesU-Can-Do SF 3D GP/EPThis plane appears to be the latest in a line of ARF’s that can be assembled with either a nitro-powered engine or an electri...05/26/2014
    Weak Signals60th Annual RC Expo - Toledo 2014The 60th Annual Weak Signals RC Expo was held on April 4-6 2014 at the Seagate Convention Center in the lovely city of Toledo...04/28/2014
    AresP-51D Mustang 350Ares, the airborne model division of the Firelands group, has recently extended its offering in parkflier airplanes with the ...04/28/2014
    Dave's R/C Electronics SafeStartSafeStart is an electronic safe guard that lets the modeler plug in his or her battery and have full control of the model, wi...04/27/2014
    SigXA41 Sbach 300 Flying the Sbach was pure fun. Once I had gotten comfortable with it, knife edge flight was great. A little down elevator was...04/21/2014
    AeroworksLaser ARFBefore the Extras, there was Leo Loudenslager's Laser 200 which dominated the US national aerobatic championship titles in th...04/21/2014
    AresTaylorcraft 130 (RTF) Meet the newest plane from Ares (pronounced Air-Ease). A state of the art, upgradeable Taylorcraft - it comes out of the box ...04/17/2014
    Maxford USAHansa-Brandenburg ARF with SkisHere's one of the later additions to Maxford USA's lineup. Maxford USA has been a great company to offer a wide array of airc...04/17/2014
    Best Pilotsrealistic looking pilot figuresI have been in the RC hobby for a long time and one thing that has always bothered me was that it has been next to impossible...03/23/2014
    SIGKadet Senior Sport EG ARFSIG's latest offering is the new Kadet Senior Sport EG. Like the Seniors of yesterday, this version offers stable and forgivi...03/23/2014
    Aeroworks20cc-30cc Trainer GT ARF-QBEvery year I attend the Weak Signals RC Show held in Toledo, Ohio, more commonly called "The Toledo Show". One booth I always...03/23/2014
    RedwingRCSBACH RedwingRC delivers their Sbach 342 in a 30cc size, developed specifically for 30cc power plants. The plane is available in 3 ...02/17/2014
     

      Return to Magazine Homepage






     
    RCUniverse is a service of Internet Brands, Inc. Copyright © 2001-2014.  Privacy Policy
     
    GET FREE RC CONTENT FOR YOUR WEBSITE

    Search | Marketplace | Event Central | Local Clubs | Magazine | Product Ratings | New Products | Discussion Forums

    Photo Gallery | Instructor Search | Field|Track|Marina Search | RCU Youtube Channel | | RCU Twitter!

    Member Locator | Advertisers | Hobby Vendor Resources | Rate Manufacturers | Sign In/Sign Up

    Products Videos WattFlyer.com RC Classifieds

    RCU4 | 50.17.27.205 | 0 | 1 | 08:35:04 PM EST | NC